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I'm a huge procrastinator, but in the past few years I had to finally sit down and focus so I could pass my entrance exams, and now that I'm in university, I really need to learn something. Anything. Problem: I still don't know how to do it haha.

Mostly I try to write down everything my teachers say, so I get an idea on how to tackle the subject. Actually listening to what they say doesn't help, nor does reading.

So do you guys have any (effective) studying habits?
 
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It depends on what you're studying. If you need to remember definitions, write them on post-it-notes and place them around your home so that you can see them everyday. Like, on your fridge or something. Then, when you go get food, you can study at the same time! xD (also just the act of reading it everyday will help you remember it easier.)

Another thing you can try is writing information in dot point form, so you can get a basic understanding of the information you're trying to learn. You can slowly elaborate on them once you get more knowledge of the topic.

Also, never type things, always hand write! It helps with memorising information.

Hope these help! :)
 

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An ISFP have to invent his own method of Studying .becouse we SP's are the most
unfortunate when it comes to traditional ways of attaining knowledge so we either have
to follow alternative ways that click with us or we have to invent our own which could varry from ISFP
to another
 

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All I can say from experience is that not taking good notes and waiting until the night before the exam to study for the first time, is not recommended. Often overcoming procrastination was more difficult than the actual material.
 

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It does depend on what you are studying, but my tip is physicalise it as much as possible. Writing it down a few times is one way - like, write it out, then summarise it in smaller paragraphs, then write it in dot points.
If you can, modelling is great. That's what I did in chemistry because I couldn't understand the interactions of the molecules, so I got one of those modelling kits and it really helped.
Go outside to study and go for a walk every now and then.
 

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I haven't tested this to the fullest extent for myself yet, but I have a feeling recording lectures and listening to them again as you review your notes later helps a lot.
 

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I don't know if my "advice" will be any good, but I think the first thing to do is find what time of day your brain is most active/alive/alert and capable of functioning at peak capacity. Now, _that_ is the time you do NOT want to be in class. Lectures are boring, dull, and brain-numbing. It doesn't matter how well your brain functions, lectures will put it to sleep. Use lectures to dumbly take down in handwritten notes what you are hearing. Typing won't be the same as writing each letter individually. I couldn't read my own handwriting, so I always printed individual letters, rather than "longhand" or "manuscript". Some classes make it easy to outline. Others require a bit of brain work, but that is not necessarily a bad thing. It's the one thing that keeps your brain thinking. ;-)

Now, what to do with that good brain time? That's the time to review your notes and work on projects--especially your creative ones--your writing or whatever you need. I'm a morning person. My brain does best before lunch time, so I always did my best to leave my mornings free of classes. I'd go to the library, and first thing I'd do was quickly write down things I needed to work on that day, and then I'd randomly work on something until I got bored. I might take a drink break, and then work on something else, and rotate through until time to read my notes for whatever classes I'd have that day, just to refresh my memory. If I had an exam or quiz, I'd also prepare for them in the morning. I seldom studied at night--but I would work on writing projects then. I couldn't do that now. My brain is useless after 3 or 4pm now, but back then, I could work until 9 or 10 at night--or even later if need must. But I tried to do most of my studying and work in the mornings. If you are a night person, it's probably easier, but if an afternoon person, then you'd want to schedule classes in the mornings.

Like I said, this worked for me. Between this and using a DayTimer to keep track of my class assignments and projects, in one semester I raised my grade average several points. I went from C-B average (somewhere in the high 2.somethings in US terms) to mid 3.3-3.4 by the time I graduated. And in the first semester I did this, I went to B-A average.

I can't say it will work for you, but IMO, finding the hours where you function at peak capacity and doing your studying then is probably the simplest thing you can do--especially if it's the mornings, as there are fewer distractions (like basketball or tennis or socializing--and the added benefit is your evenings are free for fun--unless you work, like I did) ;-)
 

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I think my brain best functions somewhere between 4 am -8 am .
 

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I listen to music while working, whether it's on projects or my personal work, it helps me to focus. Usually laid back music like tokimonsta, and Beach House.
 
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