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What is your gift-giving style? Also, what kinds of gifts do you like to receive, and how do you tend to react to a gift that you like versus one that you dislike?

I am doing this for all the types...eventually...

Anyway, I have a few thoughts on the ISFP based on functions, but I am interested in feedback from actual ISFPs. Please add your own thoughts along the way, as my description is certainly not meant to be definitive.

An ISFP's gift is likely to appeal to the senses in a subtle way, enhancing its own beauty as well as its surroundings. If their gift somehow does not meet the expected effect, the ISFP might try again next time to create the desired effect, possibly even buying or making the same sort of gift again, only this time in a different color, or different size...And the recipient, not wishing to appear unappreciative, may continue to display the old gift along with the new one, causing the ISFP great consternation as she expected the new gift to replace the old one.
 

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Hmm.. I don´t have any complicated reasons for gift giving, I just make something for someone in hope of establishing a closer relationship. I recently made jerky for my family and a co-worker, my teriyaki recipe is reaching perfection! I made a painting for another co-worker although he recently made it apparent that he cares more about his career than me and I don´t trust people who value jobs more than friends.

I prefer to make my gifts if I don´t know what a person really wants and I have time. I don´t expect anything in return other than a stronger relationship. I don´t like it when someone doesn´t show any appreciation for what I made or that I feel I´ve been used for my creative talents. I hope that answers what your looking for.
 

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My gift giving is quite often based on aesthetics like you've mentioned..but at the same time I wouldn't want to pick out a gift just because I thought it was appealing - I try to place the recipient's likes above my own to an extent. Function is less important to me as long as I find the gift is something the recipient can appreciate. The description you added is something I'd definitely do and feel (buying a replacement gift and being upset it wasn't used as such)..but if I know I've struck out in gift giving, I'm more apt to buy something less personal (maybe a gift card or something) the next time.

As for gifts I like to receive..really anything as long as it isn't hideous. I'm thinking of a gift that was sort of a statue/figurine type thing I recently received and it's quite unappealing to me. I wanted to display it to spare the giver's feelings, but I just couldn't. I still feel bad about it now that I'm thinking about it..only not bad enough to take it out from its hiding place. Like the cliché states, it is the thought that counts, so I can appreciate some gifts only on that level.
 

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I hate giving gifts unless I know it's something the person wants, which I'm usually terrible at figuring out unless they tell me straight out. This causes me to play it safe and either give something similar each time, or just something generic, like jewelry. When my best friend and I were younger we would give each other fairy figurines for birthdays and holidays. When we got older it was jewelry. For my mom, I get her a different Kitchen Fairie figurine each bday/holiday. The last thing I got her was a tea set she had said she wanted but couldn't afford.

When I was younger and went to birthday parties, I would always get embarrassed when it was gift-opening time. I didn't like that everyone would stand around and judge your gift; it was bad enough to have to watch the receiver's response.

As for receiving gifts, I think I would be most happy with something like homemade cookies, or of course something specific that I needed/wanted at the time. I'm very picky about jewelry, clothes, decorations, etc. so those don't really work as gifts unless I pick them out myself. I am always polite though when receiving any gift and will pretend I love it even if I don't.
 

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I'm going to refer back to a post I made on the Materialism thread:

I put thought into my presents. My gifts they are usually tied to a memory I had with the person or an inside joke (meaningful) or something I know they really want. It might not be something "pretty" that I would want for myself, but something I know will please or impress the person. The more joy they get out of it, the more successful the gift! I personally used to spoil my friends as a kid just for this reason.

I don't think we really think about money or expensive things for their own sake. :wink:
As for receiving gifts --many people like me to spell it out. GIFT CARDS! I can browse options and pick out exactly what I decide. Pretty jewelry, nice music, books, a new headset, etc.

I hate giving gifts unless I know it's something the person wants, which I'm usually terrible at figuring out unless they tell me straight out.
This is why I send more greeting cards and candy than presents. I give presents to a tiny handful of people I know well.
 
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An ISFP's gift is likely to appeal to the senses in a subtle way, enhancing its own beauty as well as its surroundings. If their gift somehow does not meet the expected effect, the ISFP might try again next time to create the desired effect, possibly even buying or making the same sort of gift again, only this time in a different color, or different size...And the recipient, not wishing to appear unappreciative, may continue to display the old gift along with the new one, causing the ISFP great consternation as she expected the new gift to replace the old one.
I have never done this, but maybe other ISFPs do?

I'm usually pretty good with getting a gift that someone will either use or enjoy, or both. I can remember making gifts as a child, but I haven't done this for a long time. It just seems kind of cheesy when I do it. I guess if you were a very skilled craftsperson, though, it wouldn't be so cheesy.

I always try to think about what the other person likes, not what I like. I think this is where people get into trouble with gift giving. My gifts are only aesthetically pleasing if that is what the other person would want. If I'm buying tools or a headlamp for my brother, for example, I'm not going to worry about aesthetics. If I'm buying a decorative garden pot for my mom, however, aesthetics are important. And I try to think about the colors and style that she likes, not what I like.
 
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