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I'm wondering if anyone else has this issue.

My friend (ISTJ) is very prone to plagiarism, because his learning style involves memorizing phrases and regurgitating them when they apply in the present. Most of what he says is word-for-word something that's been said to him or that he's read. So when doing homework, for instance, the only way that he knows how to phrase a thought is the way he originally heard it, so you can see what that leads to... compiling a bunch of sentences taken from different contexts in the past and duplicating them to write an assignment.

Does anyone else here who is Si-dom relate? I can only assume this is an Si trait but I've never heard it mentioned here.
 

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Oh, yes. I do that too. When writing down sources for a paper, I always put in the original word order in quotations so I know I"ll have to reword later. It's always difficult to reword, it sounds so much better in the original author's language. :(
 

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Oh, yes. I do that too. When writing down sources for a paper, I always put in the original word order in quotations so I know I"ll have to reword later. It's always difficult to reword, it sounds so much better in the original author's language. :(
I do this too.

My grammar is terrible too. I write well because I read a lot and have memorized models of proper form, but as far as understanding the actual rules and knowing what things are I'm pretty clueless. I can barely diagram basic sentences.
 

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I do this too.

My grammar is terrible too. I write well because I read a lot and have memorized models of proper form, but as far as understanding the actual rules and knowing what things are I'm pretty clueless. I can barely diagram basic sentences.
heh, try taking another language. That gets all sorts of confusing.....I dont know what accusative and preterites are in English let alone German or something! lol
 

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heh, try taking another language. That gets all sorts of confusing.....I dont know what accusative and preterites are in English let alone German or something! lol
I did try. :sad: I failed French and barely passed German. I only passed the German because I memorized forms and phrases and my Dad tutored me.
 

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I don't get the problem with foreign languages. It seems that if the teachers told you what the grammar structure meant in English, you should be able to tell what it means in the foreign languages. The hard part would be remembering all the different words and forms of the words, as well as the fact that the same word can mean many different things depending on what the words around it are. When I took Latin, we would always be given what the grammar meant in English.

Granted, I have been told that a lot of times the teachers don't take much time to explain some of the grammar rules. Additionally, I could be taking for granted how much English grammar is taught during the early years of education. I seem to have learned a lot of grammar throughout elementary school, but maybe others didn't. Knowing the grammar in English would help for learning a foreign language.
 

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I don't get the problem with foreign languages. It seems that if the teachers told you what the grammar structure meant in English, you should be able to tell what it means in the foreign languages. The hard part would be remembering all the different words and forms of the words, as well as the fact that the same word can mean many different things depending on what the words around it are. When I took Latin, we would always be given what the grammar meant in English.

Granted, I have been told that a lot of times the teachers don't take much time to explain some of the grammar rules. Additionally, I could be taking for granted how much English grammar is taught during the early years of education. I seem to have learned a lot of grammar throughout elementary school, but maybe others didn't. Knowing the grammar in English would help for learning a foreign language.
Most of the grammar instruction I got was playing MADLIBS and having to remember what adjectives, nouns and verbs were.

I do remember having to construct certain kinds of sentences and labeling them (or something) but there was maybe only two or three days of that....
 

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I've never had a problem with plagarism. But then again, I enjoy rephrasing and paraphrasing what I read. It's like a silent challenge to my imagination.
 

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Maybe it could be a cultural difference? I have heard the criticism made that some of the Chinese/Asian students in my Master of Accounting program and the MBA program at my university don't understand what plagiarism is. (By Chinese/Asian, I mean that they received their compulsory education (like high school, middle school, elementary school) in China/Asia, NOT that they are educated in America but come from Chinese/Asian families). From what I have been told, it seems (at least to some American students from both of these programs) that the culture in these countries does not have rules that are as strict at the rules in America are about what is copying other people's work and what is merely sharing ideas. Or maybe the culture doesn't frown upon plagiarism as much.

I wouldn't know for sure. The above sure does not sound politically incorrect, and I don't mean to offend anyone. But if anyone (especially people from Asia/China) has an opinion about my thoughts above, his or her opinion would be appreciated.
 

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@Poptart, I'm guessing your friend hasn't used or isn't required to use "Turn It In" or "Smart Assignment" which checks your paper for word for word phrasing. Some schools love it, others do not. Personally I never had a problem paraphrasing but know other people who do.

On a different and grammar based note: while going through the teacher program I was told there are two main ways to teach grammar. The Organic Approach (kids learn grammar through writing, no formal grammar lessons are taught) and The Structured Approach (formal grammar lessons, emphasis on rules, diagramming, and learning the function of each word and punctuation mark). When I was in elementary the "thing to do" was the Organic Approach, honestly a lot of grammar rules I didn't know until high school and college.
 

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@Poptart , I'm guessing your friend hasn't used or isn't required to use "Turn It In" or "Smart Assignment" which checks your paper for word for word phrasing. Some schools love it, others do not. Personally I never had a problem paraphrasing but know other people who do.
My school used something like that. Thankfully it allowed you to let it check your paper without submitting a "final" version. I spent hours rephrasing and resubmitting until I got it plagiarism free.

As far as grammar, it was mostly the organic approach for me too. I learned the basics (nouns, adjectives, etc) but after that it was all example.

I want to learn it structurally so I can attempt to improve my foreign language skills again, but I haven't had the time.
 

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Maybe it could be a cultural difference? I have heard the criticism made that some of the Chinese/Asian students in my Master of Accounting program and the MBA program at my university don't understand what plagiarism is. (By Chinese/Asian, I mean that they received their compulsory education (like high school, middle school, elementary school) in China/Asia, NOT that they are educated in America but come from Chinese/Asian families). From what I have been told, it seems (at least to some American students from both of these programs) that the culture in these countries does not have rules that are as strict at the rules in America are about what is copying other people's work and what is merely sharing ideas. Or maybe the culture doesn't frown upon plagiarism as much.
A short article from the Internet TESL Journal (note my citation, ha! :laughing:) says:

"[Q]uoting from a well-known authority is showing a sign of respect and deep reverence for the authority. Knowledge according to some societies including Asian is considered to belong to the society as a whole and it is a duty to share it with others. This asserts the idea of a collective society...which opposes the view on the value of individual rights and ownership."

IMO - sounds legit. At the time of its introduction, the western idea of individual intellectual property or copyright ownership was a relatively new and foreign concept to most Asian societies. 'Hogging' an idea as your own would've been something unthinkable back then.

Another paper states that "[rote] memorisation continues to play an important role [in modern Asian classrooms], and students are often given lecture notes and handouts to memorise. This method of teaching and learning may have resulted in "learned plagiarism" as students are encouraged to memorise and copy the work of others during the learning process."

But to be fair, the degree of leniency towards plagiarism really depends on that society's amount of exposure to the practices of the Western academia. East Asian countries have been open to the West for more than a century now - the younger generation certainly understands the idea of textual ownership and that academic plagiarism is a Really Bad Thing. South Korean universities have related honour codes, and a number of them even run their own software programs to detect student plagiarism.

In other words, the kids who have been charged with misconduct in your school didn't plagiarize because of any underlying cultural values. They were just too goddamn lazy to come up with original ideas.
 
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