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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've taken the MBTI a ton of times and I usually get ISTJ as a result. However, every time I do, my S is always at an incredibly low percentage to a point where it's usually 1-3% out of 100%. Whenever I don't get ISTJ as a result, of course it'll be INTJ instead (But then my N is 1-3% out of 100%.) On top of this, I often feel like I have trouble relating to ISTJs since I'm far more comfortable breaking tradition and thinking of creative alternatives. Even then, I always feel that INTJs take it too far when trusting their gut, when sometimes basing decisions on experiences makes more sense. In a way I like to plan my deviance, if that makes any sense...

Is it possible that I'm both an ISTJ and an INTJ? Ugh, but calling myself an IXTJ makes me feel like I'm underdeveloped on my typing.

Do any other ISTJs and INTJs have this problem?
 

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I have the same problem—my intuition is quite developed, and so I often think differently from a stereotypical ISTJ; I don't like tradition for the sake of tradition, I am constantly getting lost deep in thought, thinking about theoretical topics, etc. So much so that now and then I think I might be INTJ. Every other aspect of my type is pretty clear to me.

I guess what it boils down to is whether you usually use S or N primarily. Do you usually think about the "why", or the "how"?
-If someone shows you a new tool or process, do you think more about the theory behind it, or do you just want to implement it?
-Are you constantly thinking about how things could be innovated/changed? That could be an intuitive trait.
-Also, intuitives (I think) are more likely to prefer Chemistry to Biology, and it's often the opposite for Sensors.
-Does everything you see in the world remind you of something else that is technically unrelated but has a similar process/appearance? Intuitives often do this.

I think S vs N is a hard one, because it has to do with how you think inwardly, and it doesn't always reflect outwardly in an obvious way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have the same problem—my intuition is quite developed, and so I often think differently from a stereotypical ISTJ; I don't like tradition for the sake of tradition, I am constantly getting lost deep in thought, thinking about theoretical topics, etc. So much so that now and then I think I might be INTJ. Every other aspect of my type is pretty clear to me.

I guess what it boils down to is whether you usually use S or N primarily. Do you usually think about the "why", or the "how"?
-If someone shows you a new tool or process, do you think more about the theory behind it, or do you just want to implement it?
-Are you constantly thinking about how things could be innovated/changed? That could be an intuitive trait.
-Also, intuitives (I think) are more likely to prefer Chemistry to Biology, and it's often the opposite for Sensors.
-Does everything you see in the world remind you of something else that is technically unrelated but has a similar process/appearance? Intuitives often do this.

I think S vs N is a hard one, because it has to do with how you think inwardly, and it doesn't always reflect outwardly in an obvious way.
I guess I go for the why more than the how.

I usually just implement the tool.

Well my major in college Sociology (one I'm happy with) which isn't a natural science, but still a science.

And yeah I feel like everything is related in some form or another, but I still prefer putting things into separate categories.

Like I guess I'm more of an S than an N, but hardly to such an extent that I feel like I tread the line.
 

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Trying to type yourself using the dichotomies (I/E, N/S, F/T, J/P) can be very difficult. I would suggest learning about cognitive functions. This site explains what functions are and how they work.

As a note: after a while on this forum, you might notice that some people have a tendency to say that Intuitives are inherently better than Sensors, or that certain types are "smarter" or "more rational" than other types. Don't buy into it, or any other kind of typism. Type doesn't determine how well you can think (or feel)- only your preference for how you go about it.

Some articles that I think you would find useful:

On the Bias against Sensation
How to tell if you are INTJ or ISTJ
 

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I've taken the MBTI a ton of times and I usually get ISTJ as a result. However, every time I do, my S is always at an incredibly low percentage to a point where it's usually 1-3% out of 100%. Whenever I don't get ISTJ as a result, of course it'll be INTJ instead (But then my N is 1-3% out of 100%.) On top of this, I often feel like I have trouble relating to ISTJs since I'm far more comfortable breaking tradition and thinking of creative alternatives. Even then, I always feel that INTJs take it too far when trusting their gut, when sometimes basing decisions on experiences makes more sense. In a way I like to plan my deviance, if that makes any sense...

Is it possible that I'm both an ISTJ and an INTJ? Ugh, but calling myself an IXTJ makes me feel like I'm underdeveloped on my typing.

Do any other ISTJs and INTJs have this problem?
The word traditional does not mean that we are locked into certain ideas/concepts/actions: I prefer to say that "i like the familiar" or "i like to be comfortable", that does not make me a slave to tradition.

I will adapt any method, at any time, if I see a reason to: this also means that I will use creative solutions to alter a system or method to improve the product/output/save time. Once I have does this however, I will resist further change to my perfected system.
 

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Do any other ISTJs and INTJs have this problem?
I test ISTJ perhaps 90% of the time. Other times I test INTJ but I also see ISTP or INTP (perhaps less so than INTJ). When I don't test ISTJ, it can often be on the tests where there'll be one or more questions where I either a) aren't quite sure what they're getting at, so aren't sure which answer is most "me" or b) don't relate to any of the options for the answers.

What also happens is I venture into other parts of this forum. When I'm in this sub-forum, I don't usually doubt my ISTJ-ness. When I go into the more general forums, I'll often see either biased or inaccurate comments which often make me seem more INTJ than ISTJ.

I've kind of deduced it's normal to question your type, but, for me, I always come back here in the end...

I guess what it boils down to is whether you usually use S or N primarily. Do you usually think about the "why", or the "how"?
-If someone shows you a new tool or process, do you think more about the theory behind it, or do you just want to implement it?
-Are you constantly thinking about how things could be innovated/changed? That could be an intuitive trait.
-Also, intuitives (I think) are more likely to prefer Chemistry to Biology, and it's often the opposite for Sensors.
-Does everything you see in the world remind you of something else that is technically unrelated but has a similar process/appearance? Intuitives often do this.
Interesting way of looking at it.
  • I'm definitely a "Why" person.
  • I tend to want to understand the tool or process, and then implement it (not so much the theory of it, but be clear on the process or the instructions of how it works).
  • I'm constantly looking at how to improve things - it's not really innovation, and it's certainly not change for changes sake.
  • Hated biology at school. Loved Chemistry. Still much the same 15 years after studying A level Chemistry (I didn't take biology). When studying Geology, I was most drawn to how rocks were composed or structured, but disliked palaeontology (although evolution is one of my favoured biology areas).
  • I'm not certain on this one. I'd say there's an element of that, but it ties in with my understanding of Si rather than a sign of being an intuitive? My brain is constantly comparing and contrasting everything I see with everything I've seen before or knowledge I've obtained - the links aren't always the most logical - if there's a remote link, it tends to be flagged in any event, and ranked below links which are closer to the new thing.

Thanks for the links. I've not spent a lot of time on the Celebrity Types website, primarily because I didn't think their test was among the best and because I'm not really interested in typing celebrities, but the articles were interesting. I particularly liked the reference to Gifts Differing which I concur, does suffer from the intuitive bias (although I found the feeler bias far stronger) which doesn't help matters on the MBTI front. Still, I guess we're all biased in some respects as it can be really difficult to fully visualise how others see things (for both intuitives and sensors).

The word traditional does not mean that we are locked into certain ideas/concepts/actions: I prefer to say that "i like the familiar" or "i like to be comfortable", that does not make me a slave to tradition.

I will adapt any method, at any time, if I see a reason to: this also means that I will use creative solutions to alter a system or method to improve the product/output/save time. Once I have does this however, I will resist further change to my perfected system.
This is a far better description of the so called "traditional" aspect and resistance to change. I think we can seem that way to our opposites, but it grates because it's not technically correct.

The only time I really recognise this trait in myself is when all hell lets loose. If I'm faced with chaos and no plan of action to get it right (so usually when it's something unexpected), I can have an internal panic, at which point I start clinging to what I know best. This gives me a sense of calm and allows me to come to a plan of action which then puts me back into my natural mindset, which is one which is constantly seeking progress and perfectionism. Which I see as being the opposite in that because nothing is ever perfect, you're constantly looking at the best way to change it and make it better.

Personally, I feel uncomfortable when things become stagnant, but I also like to have something familiar around me at all times. If I'm going somewhere new, I need a plan or an idea of what to expect to give me that familiarity. But as long as I have that, I love new experiences - it feeds the Si-database, which craves information and a constant flow of details.
 

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I've taken the MBTI a ton of times and I usually get ISTJ as a result. However, every time I do, my S is always at an incredibly low percentage to a point where it's usually 1-3% out of 100%. Whenever I don't get ISTJ as a result, of course it'll be INTJ instead (But then my N is 1-3% out of 100%.) On top of this, I often feel like I have trouble relating to ISTJs since I'm far more comfortable breaking tradition and thinking of creative alternatives. Even then, I always feel that INTJs take it too far when trusting their gut, when sometimes basing decisions on experiences makes more sense. In a way I like to plan my deviance, if that makes any sense...

Is it possible that I'm both an ISTJ and an INTJ? Ugh, but calling myself an IXTJ makes me feel like I'm underdeveloped on my typing.

Do any other ISTJs and INTJs have this problem?
I'm ENTP myself but I think I could help out.

The S/N distinction is rather an uncommon one unlike the I/E subtlety which happens a lot more often.An INTJ would have dominant function Ni while the ISTJ would have dominant function Si(the secondary and tertiary function are the same).So ask yourself this:do you remember bodily sensations about stuff that happened sometime ago and do you have nostalgic feelings when this happens or are you more prone to internal ideas such as sudden flashes of inspiration which order the things you experience in certain ways?

The first is ISTJ the second INTJ.
Also do you find it harder to accept funny new ideas(ISTJ) or do you find it harder to experience and be fully aware of things happening at the present moment?(INTJ)

You could also try the cognitive functions test which helps you sort this out better(just google "cognitive functions")
Hope this helps:happy:
 

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I have spent the past weeks with many Si preferrers (ENFP, ISTJ, ESTJ), so I will just point out my observations (I prefer Se):

The Si preferrers had difficulty living in the moment and just experiencing it for what it was.

Instead, they were quite obsessed with capturing the moments. Quite literally, as the ISTJ and ESTJ carried around two really expensive cameras and took pictures of literally every mundane thing you can think of. Everything they ate. What they wore. Lots of selfies. Cool things they saw. The bars we went to. Everything. They wanted to document it all in pictures instead of just experiencing it like I did. (I hate taking pictures of things like that. Would way rather just have the experiences and move on).

It actually very strongly seemed like the Si preferrers were living in the past. They took pictures to cope with the present moment because they didn't like dealing with it and just living in it. These are the kinds of people you would find making scrapbooks and itineraries of what to do because they so strongly hate living in the present moment and just experiencing life.

Me, I just wanted to go exploring and follow my intuitions. When we got lost a couple times, I wanted to find a new route (a shortcut) to get us to where we needed to go. They wanted to just retrace our steps and go back the way we came. We actually conflicted on this a few times. I "knew" a better way (because I looked at the map), but they didn't feel comfortable taking it because they had never experienced it before, whereas they knew that retracing their steps would work because they already experienced that. It was familiar to them.

In this way you can really see how the unknown made them a bit hesitant and uncomfortable, whereas with me: I ran toward the unknown head first. I "knew" how everything was going to work out, and I felt super comfortable trusting this knowledge and working with it. If something didn't work out the way I expected, I was still super lax about it because I knew everything was going to work out. It was just this super comfortableness with the unknown (because to me it was very much a known). Whereas with them, their comfortableness lay with things that were familiar to them. Things that were concrete for them because they had already experienced them before.

This was a recurring theme: familiarity. We were quite opposite in this regard because it always seemed like I had the desire to branch out and try new things (I shunned familiarity), whereas they desired to go back to restaurants we already ate at or order the same beers they already tried earlier (because those things were proven to work and be good for them, so they wanted to recreate them and rehash the same old experiences they already had).

The ENFP didn't manifest as strongly as the ISTJ and ESTJ in familiarity-seeking, however one thing I notice about her is that she tends to tell the same stories again and again. Not to the same person, mind you, but she'll tell me a story, I'll find it humorous, and then she'll use that as like a clue that it s a good story, and then she'll keep telling that same story to everyone new she meets. Very much like a standup comedian. This is a very Si thing to do, as her goal with this is to bring about pleasurable experiences for people in the form of laughter. And she does this by pulling from her storehouse of pleasurable-experience-making stories.

[hr][/hr]
I hope none of this came off as criticism or complaining. I actually love these people a helluva lot. Especially the ESTJ. We just have some quirky differences due to our cognition, and I wanted to highlight those. And since it was written from my perspective, of course it had my biases added to it.
 
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So ask yourself this:do you remember bodily sensations about stuff that happened sometime ago
Sorta the right idea, but...
  • would be better if "bodily" was left out. "Sensation" already implies physical senses... "bodily" makes it seem like something more... that it's not.
  • "remember" implies, at least to me, fully formed memories which typically include a contextual "narrative" of events. Si recollections are typically very specific, very detailed but also very isolated snapshots of what was seen/heard/smelled/touched/tasted. When necessary, I can... very vividly... "see" the rich details of an apple... "feel" the cold tile of the bathroom floor... etc, etc. However, these carry no context, no narrative, no feelings... they are just detailed recollections of the sensory data itself.
  • "sometime ago" implies a limitation to more distant recollections. It actually applies to anything we've experienced in our environment... even the most recent (i.e., seconds ago) experiences.

A better phrasing of this might be, "Do you regularly recollect detailed sensory impressions of objects you've previously encountered in your environment and use them as a comparative tool when evaluating your current environment?"

...and do you have nostalgic feelings when this happens?
I don't think this is a very good "test" for being an ISTJ. Si has no "feelings" whatsoever, and an ISTJ's Fi is stacked low enough that nostalgic feelings rarely give rise... they certainly do not for me. I could possibly see a lower stacked (and lesser controlled) Si generating sensory images that a higher-order feeling function might grab hold of and get nostalgic over, but this is not a typical thing for an ISTJ with dominant Si and tertiary Fi.

Also do you find it harder to accept funny new ideas(ISTJ)
Not the worst way to phrase this... just remember that an ISTJ's acceptance of new ideas hinges on their ability to fully vet the concept. We can accept lots of "funny ideas" if we're allowed to do our due diligence on them and prove to ourselves that the risk/reward ratio is acceptable. So... if "harder" refers to the effort we feel necessary to "sweat the details" sufficiently to prove a concept both worthwhile and safe, I agree. If "harder" refers to having an obstinate attitude about any and all new ideas, then I certainly would NOT agree. I prefer to use the terms "cautious and diligent evaluation" to describe our approach to new new ideas... and that would apply to our own ideas as well as those of others.
 

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I have spent the past weeks with many Si preferrers (ENFP, ISTJ, ESTJ), so I will just point out my observations (I prefer Se):

The Si preferrers had difficulty living in the moment and just experiencing it for what it was.

Instead, they were quite obsessed with capturing the moments. Quite literally, as the ISTJ and ESTJ carried around two really expensive cameras and took pictures of literally every mundane thing you can think of. Everything they ate. What they wore. Lots of selfies. Cool things they saw. The bars we went to. Everything. They wanted to document it all in pictures instead of just experiencing it like I did. (I hate taking pictures of things like that. Would way rather just have the experiences and move on).

It actually very strongly seemed like the Si preferrers were living in the past. They took pictures to cope with the present moment because they didn't like dealing with it and just living in it. These are the kinds of people you would find making scrapbooks and itineraries of what to do because they so strongly hate living in the present moment and just experiencing life.

Me, I just wanted to go exploring and follow my intuitions. When we got lost a couple times, I wanted to find a new route (a shortcut) to get us to where we needed to go. They wanted to just retrace our steps and go back the way we came. We actually conflicted on this a few times. I "knew" a better way (because I looked at the map), but they didn't feel comfortable taking it because they had never experienced it before, whereas they knew that retracing their steps would work because they already experienced that. It was familiar to them.

In this way you can really see how the unknown made them a bit hesitant and uncomfortable, whereas with me: I ran toward the unknown head first. I "knew" how everything was going to work out, and I felt super comfortable trusting this knowledge and working with it. If something didn't work out the way I expected, I was still super lax about it because I knew everything was going to work out. It was just this super comfortableness with the unknown (because to me it was very much a known). Whereas with them, their comfortableness lay with things that were familiar to them. Things that were concrete for them because they had already experienced them before.

This was a recurring theme: familiarity. We were quite opposite in this regard because it always seemed like I had the desire to branch out and try new things (I shunned familiarity), whereas they desired to go back to restaurants we already ate at or order the same beers they already tried earlier (because those things were proven to work and be good for them, so they wanted to recreate them and rehash the same old experiences they already had).

The ENFP didn't manifest as strongly as the ISTJ and ESTJ in familiarity-seeking, however one thing I notice about her is that she tends to tell the same stories again and again. Not to the same person, mind you, but she'll tell me a story, I'll find it humorous, and then she'll use that as like a clue that it s a good story, and then she'll keep telling that same story to everyone new she meets. Very much like a standup comedian. This is a very Si thing to do, as her goal with this is to bring about pleasurable experiences for people in the form of laughter. And she does this by pulling from her storehouse of pleasurable-experience-making stories.

[HR][/HR]
I hope none of this came off as criticism or complaining. I actually love these people a helluva lot. Especially the ESTJ. We just have some quirky differences due to our cognition, and I wanted to highlight those. And since it was written from my perspective, of course it had my biases added to it.

Good observations, but I think there is some room for alternate interpretations of what you observed.

I, for one, would have taken the alternate return route rather than retracing steps... IF I had a map handy to help me visualize that route (I score extremely high in visual/spatial intelligence and would find it quite easy to "see" and be comfortable with the alternate path from a map). If your Si friends did not have the opportunity to review a map or are not particularly adept at visualizing their environment from one, then I can see why they preferred retracing their route. You are correct that we prefer to avoid the unknown... but there are ways to make the unknown become known without having to resort to sticking to what we've already done.

I tend to take lots of pictures with expensive cameras... but I never have the intent of capturing the moment for myself. I am motivated to take pictures for one of two reasons... either because I see a good artistic composition that I would like to capture, or it's some interesting object that I see... in either case, the intent is to share it with others. In fact, I often have specific people in mind to share with when I'm taking a picture. I rarely, if ever, go through pictures I've taken for my own pleasure/satisfaction... been there, done that, vivid images are burned in already. I also take a large number of pictures, but that's more to do with "safety"... the best way to ensure you got a good picture to share with others is to take enough that you can scrap the bad ones. A good ISTJ would never take just one picture and "hope" that it turns out OK. Better to take multiple shots to be sure. Interestingly, I am hyper-critical of my own photos when they don't match exactly with what I saw... I see no point in sharing something that does not align with what I saw myself. What's the point?

I think your ENFP experience is a good example of what I was referring to in my previous post about lower-order Si triggering nostalgic episodes in higher order Fi.
 

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I, for one, would take the alternate return route rather than retracing steps... IF I had a map handy to help me visualize that route (I score extremely high in visual/spatial intelligence and would find it quite easy to "see" and be comfortable with the alternate path from a map). If your Si friends did not have the opportunity to review a map or are not particularly adept at visualizing their environment from one, then I can see why they preferred retracing their route. You are correct that we prefer to avoid the unknown... but there are ways to make the unknown become known without having to resort to sticking to what we've already done.
Yes, fair point.

I tend to take lots of pictures with expensive cameras... but I never have the intent of capturing the moment for myself. I am motivated to take pictures for one of two reasons... either because I see a good artistic composition that I would like to capture, or it's some interesting object that I see... in either case, the intent is to share it with others. In fact, I often have specific people in mind to share with when I'm taking a picture. I rarely, if ever, go through pictures I've taken for my own pleasure/satisfaction... been there, done that, vivid images are burned in already. I also take a large number of pictures, but that's more to do with "safety"... the best way to ensure you got a good picture to share with others is to take enough that you can scrap the bad ones. A good ISTJ would never take just one picture and "hope" that it turns out OK. Better to take multiple shots to be sure.
Im not sure what point you were trying to make by stating that you don't take pictures for yourself :laughing: your reasoning is still super Si--wanting to capture moments and share them with others instead of experience them first hand and live in the moment. You distract yourself with your camera so you can keep yourself constantly occupied instead of just letting loose and going with the flow, no? That's totally my impression, anyway. In my experience, strong Si preferrers get antsy when they aren't busy. And will invent tasks for themselves because they can't stand taking in life unfiltered. It's too objective. It's too Se. they will play the license plate game while on road trips. Or take something to knit. Or papers to grade. And other things like this. Wanting to be always on a mission. Can't follow whims. Can't sit back and be an observer for more than five seconds. Need to constantly be making themselves useful with busy work. Menial chores. Note taking. Recording moments instead of experiencing them. Making commentary about events going on instead of just watching them and interacting with them. Like sports commentators (your ESTJs).

I think your ENFP experience is a good example of what I was referring to in my previous post about lower-order Si triggering nostalgic episodes in higher order Fi.
I think it's very Si. It's exactly like what you do with photographs. She does it with funny stories.

I think Wordsworth poems are phenomenal examples of the INFP nostalgic Fi/Si.
 

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I'm guilty of the excessive photo taking, but I don't think I do it for quite the same reasons as @jcal. I enjoy the process of taking photos, I sometimes like playing with the settings to see different effects, but mostly, on a trip, it's about capturing the moment. I like dynamic shots which make you feel like you're there I suppose. But I also like photographs which illustrate the beauty and detail of objects I've seen.

I'm not a particularly artistic photographer - definitely more realist than abstract (no surprise there). But it's more for my own pleasure. I can enjoy sharing photos with people who I think are interested in the place I've been, or the things I've seen, but equally I enjoying looking through old photos which can effect me nostalgically. Could be my INFP sister's influence, though she's far worse at nostalgic-photo-reminiscing than I am.

You hear people moan about people who just walk around with cameras to their faces taking photos, saying that they miss everything looking through the lens. Ironically for me, I find I see more and remember more of the event (before looking through the photographs) when taking photos than if I'm not. It's as if it seems to focus me in the moment, rather than let my mind wander into planning my next event.


If this is an ISTJ thing, we definitely need a photography thread. I love looking at photos, whatever they are and whoever's taken them :)
 

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Yes, fair point.


Im not sure what point you were trying to make by stating that you don't take pictures for yourself :laughing: your reasoning is still super Si--wanting to capture moments and share them with others instead of experience them first hand and live in the moment. You distract yourself with your camera so you can keep yourself constantly occupied instead of just letting loose and going with the flow, no? That's totally my impression, anyway. In my experience, strong Si preferrers get antsy when they aren't busy. And will invent tasks for themselves because they can't stand taking in life unfiltered. It's too objective. It's too Se. they will play the license plate game while on road trips. Or take something to knit. Or papers to grade. And other things like this. Wanting to be always on a mission. Can't follow whims. Can't sit back and be an observer for more than five seconds. Need to constantly be making themselves useful with busy work. Menial chores. Note taking. Recording moments instead of experiencing them. Making commentary about events going on instead of just watching them and interacting with them. Like sports commentators (your ESTJs).
I was mainly responding to this:

It actually very strongly seemed like the Si preferrers were living in the past. They took pictures to cope with the present moment because they didn't like dealing with it and just living in it. These are the kinds of people you would find making scrapbooks and itineraries of what to do because they so strongly hate living in the present moment and just experiencing life.
That's just not right at all. I'm very much "living in the present moment"... what's there to "deal with"? I certainly don't hate it. I'm definitely not feeling any alignment with your interpretation of this. Why can't I live it and share it simultaneously? Can't you do that?

On your new points above, the last thing I would ever do is invent busy work. I don't get antsy when there is nothing to do. I cringe if somebody wants to play stupid travel games. I never take work or reading material or anything else with me just to have something to do. I'd much rather spend the time experiencing and absorbing the details of my environment. I only get antsy when there are uncompleted tasks which I am responsible for. I love nothing more than to close out a week with no uncompleted tasks hanging over my head and just being a vegetable for the weekend... doing what I feel like, when I feel like it. Doing nothing often works, or just getting in the car and see where it goes. I did this just this past weekend... wife and daughter went to a play and I jumped in the car and just drove 75 miles of unfamiliar back roads to nowhere, and then returned (different return route... didn't "retrace my steps!). How is that not "living in the moment?

Maybe the ESTJ might like making running commentary... I doubt most ISTJs would. I certainly don't. When somebody else does that it annoys the crap out of me... STFU and let me watch the game... geeez! I hate Super Bowl parties for much the same reason. I want to watch THE GAME... not socialize or listen to everybody (who haven't watched any other game all season) make ridiculous, uninformed comments.
 

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The word traditional does not mean that we are locked into certain ideas/concepts/actions: I prefer to say that "i like the familiar" or "i like to be comfortable", that does not make me a slave to tradition.
Exactly this. Instead of being like "Yay, a new way of making spaghetti!",
I'd be like "The way you normally make it tastes very good. Why would you change it?"

Don't fix what ain't broken. However, if something is not doing it's job, you bet your ass we are going to toss it out of the window.
 

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your reasoning is still super Si--wanting to capture moments and share them with others instead of experience them first hand and live in the moment. You distract yourself with your camera so you can keep yourself constantly occupied instead of just letting loose and going with the flow, no? That's totally my impression, anyway. In my experience, strong Si preferrers get antsy when they aren't busy. And will invent tasks for themselves because they can't stand taking in life unfiltered. It's too objective. It's too Se. they will play the license plate game while on road trips. Or take something to knit. Or papers to grade. And other things like this. Wanting to be always on a mission. Can't follow whims. Can't sit back and be an observer for more than five seconds.
Se isn't sit-back-and-enjoy-the-ride function. Se is an active engagement with the environment, it likes to act upon it. Se wants to climb the tree, wants to go hiking, swimming, wants to have kinetic experience and exercise the energy. Just sitting back and relaxing, having some unfiltered information inflow, is boring to Se. Si can be passive like that. It may wind down, relax, abstract some sensory data around them and enjoy it.
Si is not the driving force of ISTJs, Te is. It's Te that wants to be productive and pushes forward to get stuff done. Si is not. It's introverted and passive.
 

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Se isn't sit-back-and-enjoy-the-ride function. Se is an active engagement with the environment, it likes to act upon it. Se wants to climb the tree, wants to go hiking, swimming, wants to have kinetic experience and exercise the energy. Just sitting back and relaxing, having some unfiltered information inflow, is boring to Se. Si can be passive like that. It may wind down, relax, abstract some sensory data around them and enjoy it.
Si is not the driving force of ISTJs, Te is. It's Te that want to be productive and pushes forward to get stuff done. Si is not. It's introverted and passive.
Exactly. There's obviously a difference in how Se and Si extract information from their environment. Si prefers to passively observe, absorbing as much detail as it possibly can. It's happy to allow others to trigger whatever is occurring and absorbing the results. Se would rather experience that same environment by being the trigger. @emberfly astutely observed this difference during his interaction with his Si buds. What I took issue with is the conclusion that was drawn from those observations. Si is not off somewhere else trying to avoid the present moment. Si is very much absorbing every last detail of the present moment. However, Si does not require direct, active participation for this to happen... in fact, direct participation often gets in the way of being able to observe and absorb. Don't make me DO something or even comment on it... just let me me absorb whatever it is that is in front of me. Se apparently prefers to participate and observe what it can from the aftermath. Si observes the details first before an ISTJ decides whether participation is necessary or desirable. This is quite consistent with the Si/Te preference... need... to maintain safety and stability.

It's also important to note that the ISTJ is not typically attempting to relate the experience to the past, either... there's no need to when we're simply absorbing new information. This is how we build our "reference library"... every new experience is immediately incorporated and instantly becomes part of our "past". We only reference this storehouse when making decisions in the present... whether it be, "Is this food safe to eat?" or "Is it a good idea to adopt this new feature in our product?".
 
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