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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know the thread already exists, however, it's closed, so @TreeBob's advice was to make a new one, which I have done. c: But you guys pretty much know the drill. Last movie you watched, plus mini-review/rating if you want.

The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh
I'll give it a 2/5.
I was pretty bored watching the movie, spending half the time on skype talking about how lame the movie was, and the other half of the time getting scared by my friends trying to make the movie scarier than it was. They'd be like "ooga booga" when the door would creak open, or one of them sneezed right when a drawer opened. But really, it could've been a lot better than it was.
 
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Snowpiercer. This is a singularly unpleasant film. The cast (John Hurt, Jamie Bell, Tilda Swinton) is excellent, and it's visually impressive. However:

1) The violence. Borders on the pornographic (the camera lingers lovingly over slow motion footage of people being axed, stabbed, shot, or their frozen arms smashed with hammers). Frankly, it's sick.

2) The philosophy of the film. It's standard radical Marxism: class war, themes of power, oppression and injustice. Human beings are oppressive, decadent, and bestial. Those in power (the white males) oppress everyone else - so all of humanity, bar an Asian woman and a black boy, all die. (And those two will probably end up as lunch for a polar bear.) This is shoddy cynicism. Life simply isn't like that.

Now, serious art (which this film aims to be) should have two purposes: it should reflect life, and it should uplift and inspire. This film does neither.

Human beings are much better than how the film presents them. We may all be capable of killing, given the right circumstances, but that doesn't mean that we are bestial. We have reason and compassion; we can improve ourselves and understand others.

The radical left
 
I would consider myself a liberal humanist, with elements of democratic socialism or social democracy.
seems to have the idea that intolerance is one-sided: there are the oppressors (white males) and the oppressed (everyone else), and that oppression justifies violence. This is itself a form of intolerance: instead of complex individuals in their own right, capable of good and evil, there are black and white types, demonic personifications. Now, there are undoubtedly problems with society, but the answer to those problems lies not in violence or in class war, but in compassion and tolerance, in co-operation.

Great works of art affirm the nobility of humanity, and offer an idea of what humanity can be. They tell us that, although terrible things may happen (wars, massacres, murders), through intolerance and the misguided quest for power, we can rise above ourselves and recognise our common humanity - and, in the end, compassion will win out.

This film does not. It is like being ranted at by a sociopathic nihilist for two hours - a sociopath with considerable artistic talent, but since those talents tell a lie, it is bad art. Good art is on the side of life and humanity; bad art is on the side of death and despair, and against humanity. This film's philosophy is a lie, and it is untrue to life and untrue to art.

Anathema upon it.
 

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Species. I liked it. I think Forest Whitaker did a good job. I liked the bounty hunter and the cultural anthropologist, too.

I'll probably watch Species II or Against The Ropes next.
 

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Divergent. To be honest I didn't like it.
I thought the main heroin was a Mary-Sue, just perfect in every way and unrealistic.
We didn't get many explanations about....anything important really, like what was that "war" they kept talking about or why "human nature is the enemy" but I heard it's going to be a trilogy so I can't complain about that yet.
The villain didn't even properly explain why she was doing all these things. She was also incredibly boring.
There were a lot of plot holes.
To sum up this movie can be entertaining if you turn your brain off while watching it. At least it had some cool action scenes and there were some strong female characters.
 
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sin city 2 a dame to die for, Robert rodriguez does in once again I haven't seen a bad movie by him yet
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The Grudge 3
4/5
I definitely liked it better than 2, and I wasn't confused watching it! The thing that bothered me about 1 and 2 is that they would randomly cut to different scenes from the past, which I guess were meant to explain the origins of the curse? But all they did was confuse me because half the time I didn't know if the scenes going on were taking place in the past or the present. But 3 didn't have that problem, thank goodness. And it was scary in the right places, I actually liked the characters, and there weren't any dumb "don't go into the room where there's no fucking light" moments.
 
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'Her' with Joaquin Phoenix.
It was a pretty good film, though a little long in parts .
The soundtrack and cinematography were absolutely stunning though.
 
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Ghost Dog : The Way of the Samurai. I liked him in Species but this was probably my favorite Forest Whitaker role.
 

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IVAN GROZNY (Ivan the Terrible), by Eisenstein. Absolutely magnificent. A lot of criticism (e.g., Ebert) seems to be reluctant admiration, but not affection - they admire its visual qualities, but not the drama. It is visually extraordinary, with its Expressionist shadows and camera angles, the Russian costumes and sets, and some of the greatest images in film:



But it also succeeds as drama. It's a dark, intense film, comparable to Shakespeare and grand opera (certainly to Boris Godunov, although Eisenstein was influenced by Wagner): it's built as a series of scenes, and culminates in the banquet scene and the murder in the cathedral - a masterpiece of dramatic irony.

Unfortunately, Part III was destroyed by Stalin. At least we have two-thirds of something absolutely incredible.
 

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I watched Roman Polanski's "Repulsion". It was very interesting. I recommend it if you like psychological thrillers.
 

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The 1961 Parent Trap, haha. I love the movie and have watched it a billion times, so it was nothing new to me. It'll always be a classic.
 
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