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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm confused.

I don't think I use Se. However I know "learning by doing" is an Se process. So could someone explain what functions are at work? Is it perhaps an amalgamation of both judgement and perception, which is making me confused?

I remember watching some TV show explaining people learn by observation- you watch someone preform a task, which leads you to pick up on the information and therefore emulate it. I thought that was the neatest thing, and assumed that's how I learned. Then a friend attempted to teach me cartwheels- "You put your hands here, then do this, then that". Totally vague. Emphasis on visual perception, and I realized that's not how I learned. Made me feel "off" in some way, as I began to realize that seemed to be most people's emphasis. I tried to explain I needed detailed explanation, or for her to tell me what to do and then have me follow- verbal rather than visual instruction. She kept using the same teaching method. I grew frustrated and she likely thought I was stupid.

This is still inherent and innately "me". When I worked as a housekeeper (lol) my boss showed me how to make a hospital corner, then had me recreate the task. Uh, what? When she realized I wasn't getting it (and saw my frustration at not picking up on what I deemed a "simple" task), she began to tell me "you find the dented fold in the side of the blanket, then grab the corner and line it up approximately to that very fold, then grab the bottom of the blanket and tuck it under the bed" it all made sense. So I did precisely that, and it all clicked.

Same with cooking. I can't watch a show then do it later. It's easier to watch the show while cooking, and copy the tasks while being told what to do. Essentially, I can't watch someone do something, especially if there's little to no explanation, then emulate the process. I have to hear an instruction broken down in clear, specific, linear steps and recreate the instruction at that moment, or just independently do the task regardless of instruction until I figure it out. I can't just watch, then learn. I have to do it physically, independently, myself. Don't demonstrate a dance move and expect me to copy it. Tell me exactly how it's done, then I'll do it myself until I've captured the task.

What functions are at play here? I'm curious.
 

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I would like to know the answer to that too. When I took homec I can recall not understanding the instructions for sewing patterns. We had this teachers aid(one of the mothers)she would have us read the directions to see what we needed to do. I hated that,if I understood the directions I wouldn't have to ask for help! I have to say I do better trying to just do it. So maybe there are different functions with both use. I need to be hands on. For some reason telling me something it's like it loses something by the time it gets to my brain. lol

I actually do great hospital corners but my parents ran a motel when I was growing up. I would watch and then pick it up.
 

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Not sure if learning styles are correlated to MBTI.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would like to know the answer to that too. When I took homec I can recall not understanding the instructions for sewing patterns. We had this teachers aid(one of the mothers)she would have us read the directions to see what we needed to do. I hated that,if I understood the directions I wouldn't have to ask for help! I have to say I do better trying to just do it. So maybe there are different functions with both use. I need to be hands on. For some reason telling me something it's like it loses something by the time it gets to my brain. lol

I actually do great hospital corners but my parents ran a motel when I was growing up. I would watch and then pick it up.
Lol you're describing the exact opposite of how I learn. I either need instructions, that are very clear cut, specific, precise and broken down, or I need to just do things myself independently until I figure it out. I don't observe or watch.

I'm great at hospital corners. I just didn't learn through the first method my boss utilized to teach me. And I learn better when being told the instructions while doing, but instructions are great nonetheless. Or just... independence. Figuring that shit out meticulously. It's a slow, arduous, methodical and meticulous process, but once I've nailed it, I'm a genius.
 

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I think you two @hoopla and @penny lane have different learning styles. penny lane's sounds more like learning by doing, i.e. kinesthetic. I would guess that and visual could be a lot Se or maybe S in general. Visual I would guess could sometimes be more connected to Si actually, with first seeing it, then internalising that picture and then knowing what to do. Myself I know I'm most kinesthetic with a lot of visual as well, so that would fit with my Fi preference.

In addition to those there's usually auditive (hearing) mentioned and reading/writing, maybe spatial in connection to visual and then a couple of others in at least the multiple intelligenses theory, like at least intrapersonal and interpersonal. I'm not sure which fits with hoopla's style, maybe a mix of auditive and kinesthetic and maybe reading/writing. in regards to functions I think that's a bit more difficult to pin down. I'd say more Si than Se if going by the sensing functions. But it could be using intuition in sort of transforming the instructions into action more immediately than Se might do, while Se could see it and feel it and do the same. Though yes, in many things I need the understanding too and ultimately people use a bit different learning styles in many different kinds of tasks even though they have some main one(s). But I think there might be a thinking function at work too in needing to understand at first when learning something new.

I'm not an expert either on learning styles or functions but find both interesting, so these are just some guesses and I'll be interested to follow the discussion here.

If I go more into my own learning styles still here at the end. With listening I can easily let that get into a sort of blur if I don't focus more completely and the same with reading theoretical texts. Of course that depends on the text and the speaker too. But most often I remember pictures and visuals much better from textbooks than the actual words. Then when doing some physical excercise, I'm always the one who has to turn my head or peak if I'm not seeing the instructor, because I get unsure of what I'm hearing or if I understand it correctly, but then I also get it when I feel it and I often easily get things when someone corrects my position physically (like just putting a hand somewhere and telling, this is where the change should be) or says how it's supposed to feel. I can't think of other kinesthetic examples, but I know I do it.
 
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kolb learning styles definitions and descriptions


Knowing a person's (and your own) learning style enables learning to be orientated according to the preferred method. That said, everyone responds to and needs the stimulus of all types of learning styles to one extent or another - it's a matter of using emphasis that fits best with the given situation and a person's learning style preferences.


Here are brief descriptions of the four Kolb learning styles:



  • Diverging (feeling and watching - CE/RO) - These people are able to look at things from different perspectives. They are sensitive. They prefer to watch rather than do, tending to gather information and use imagination to solve problems. They are best at viewing concrete situations several different viewpoints. Kolb called this style 'Diverging' because these people perform better in situations that require ideas-generation, for example, brainstorming. People with a Diverging learning style have broad cultural interests and like to gather information. They are interested in people, tend to be imaginative and emotional, and tend to be strong in the arts. People with the Diverging style prefer to work in groups, to listen with an open mind and to receive personal feedback.
  • Assimilating (watching and thinking - AC/RO) - The Assimilating learning preference is for a concise, logical approach. Ideas and concepts are more important than people. These people require good clear explanation rather than practical opportunity. They excel at understanding wide-ranging information and organising it a clear logical format. People with an Assimilating learning style are less focused on people and more interested in ideas and abstract concepts. People with this style are more attracted to logically sound theories than approaches based on practical value. These learning style people is important for effectiveness in information and science careers. In formal learning situations, people with this style prefer readings, lectures, exploring analytical models, and having time to think things through.
  • Converging (doing and thinking - AC/AE) - People with a Converging learning style can solve problems and will use their learning to find solutions to practical issues. They prefer technical tasks, and are less concerned with people and interpersonal aspects. People with a Converging learning style are best at finding practical uses for ideas and theories. They can solve problems and make decisions by finding solutions to questions and problems. People with a Converging learning style are more attracted to technical tasks and problems than social or interpersonal issues. A Converging learning style enables specialist and technology abilities. People with a Converging style like to experiment with new ideas, to simulate, and to work with practical applications.
  • Accommodating (doing and feeling - CE/AE) - The Accommodating learning style is 'hands-on', and relies on intuition rather than logic. These people use other people's analysis, and prefer to take a practical, experiential approach. They are attracted to new challenges and experiences, and to carrying out plans. They commonly act on 'gut' instinct rather than logical analysis. People with an Accommodating learning style will tend to rely on others for information than carry out their own analysis. This learning style is prevalent and useful in roles requiring action and initiative. People with an Accommodating learning style prefer to work in teams to complete tasks. They set targets and actively work in the field trying different ways to achieve an objective.

kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory and diagram
 

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Lol you're describing the exact opposite of how I learn. I either need instructions, that are very clear cut, specific, precise and broken down, or I need to just do things myself independently until I figure it out. I don't observe or watch.

I'm great at hospital corners. I just didn't learn through the first method my boss utilized to teach me. And I learn better when being told the instructions while doing, but instructions are great nonetheless. Or just... independence. Figuring that shit out meticulously. It's a slow, arduous, methodical and meticulous process, but once I've nailed it, I'm a genius.
Yes sometimes figuring it out on my own works but depending on what it is it might take very little time or it might take a while but once it clicks I can't believe I didn't get it right away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
kolb learning styles definitions and descriptions


Knowing a person's (and your own) learning style enables learning to be orientated according to the preferred method. That said, everyone responds to and needs the stimulus of all types of learning styles to one extent or another - it's a matter of using emphasis that fits best with the given situation and a person's learning style preferences.


Here are brief descriptions of the four Kolb learning styles:



  • Diverging (feeling and watching - CE/RO) - These people are able to look at things from different perspectives. They are sensitive. They prefer to watch rather than do, tending to gather information and use imagination to solve problems. They are best at viewing concrete situations several different viewpoints. Kolb called this style 'Diverging' because these people perform better in situations that require ideas-generation, for example, brainstorming. People with a Diverging learning style have broad cultural interests and like to gather information. They are interested in people, tend to be imaginative and emotional, and tend to be strong in the arts. People with the Diverging style prefer to work in groups, to listen with an open mind and to receive personal feedback.
  • Assimilating (watching and thinking - AC/RO) - The Assimilating learning preference is for a concise, logical approach. Ideas and concepts are more important than people. These people require good clear explanation rather than practical opportunity. They excel at understanding wide-ranging information and organising it a clear logical format. People with an Assimilating learning style are less focused on people and more interested in ideas and abstract concepts. People with this style are more attracted to logically sound theories than approaches based on practical value. These learning style people is important for effectiveness in information and science careers. In formal learning situations, people with this style prefer readings, lectures, exploring analytical models, and having time to think things through.
  • Converging (doing and thinking - AC/AE) - People with a Converging learning style can solve problems and will use their learning to find solutions to practical issues. They prefer technical tasks, and are less concerned with people and interpersonal aspects. People with a Converging learning style are best at finding practical uses for ideas and theories. They can solve problems and make decisions by finding solutions to questions and problems. People with a Converging learning style are more attracted to technical tasks and problems than social or interpersonal issues. A Converging learning style enables specialist and technology abilities. People with a Converging style like to experiment with new ideas, to simulate, and to work with practical applications.
  • Accommodating (doing and feeling - CE/AE) - The Accommodating learning style is 'hands-on', and relies on intuition rather than logic. These people use other people's analysis, and prefer to take a practical, experiential approach. They are attracted to new challenges and experiences, and to carrying out plans. They commonly act on 'gut' instinct rather than logical analysis. People with an Accommodating learning style will tend to rely on others for information than carry out their own analysis. This learning style is prevalent and useful in roles requiring action and initiative. People with an Accommodating learning style prefer to work in teams to complete tasks. They set targets and actively work in the field trying different ways to achieve an objective.

kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory and diagram
Thank you for this! The only learning style system I'm aware of is the multiple intelligence theory. I'm primarily a verbal-linguistic learner, though I can relate to other styles. I'm clearly not a spacial learner, lol.

I'll look more into kolb's theory.
 
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I think you two @hoopla and @penny lane have different learning styles. penny lane's sounds more like learning by doing, i.e. kinesthetic. I would guess that and visual could be a lot Se or maybe S in general. Visual I would guess could sometimes be more connected to Si actually, with first seeing it, then internalising that picture and then knowing what to do. Myself I know I'm most kinesthetic with a lot of visual as well, so that would fit with my Fi preference.

In addition to those there's usually auditive (hearing) mentioned and reading/writing, maybe spatial in connection to visual and then a couple of others in at least the multiple intelligenses theory, like at least intrapersonal and interpersonal. I'm not sure which fits with hoopla's style, maybe a mix of auditive and kinesthetic and maybe reading/writing. in regards to functions I think that's a bit more difficult to pin down. I'd say more Si than Se if going by the sensing functions. But it could be using intuition in sort of transforming the instructions into action more immediately than Se might do, while Se could see it and feel it and do the same. Though yes, in many things I need the understanding too and ultimately people use a bit different learning styles in many different kinds of tasks even though they have some main one(s). But I think there might be a thinking function at work too in needing to understand at first when learning something new.

I'm not an expert either on learning styles or functions but find both interesting, so these are just some guesses and I'll be interested to follow the discussion here.

If I go more into my own learning styles still here at the end. With listening I can easily let that get into a sort of blur if I don't focus more completely and the same with reading theoretical texts. Of course that depends on the text and the speaker too. But most often I remember pictures and visuals much better from textbooks than the actual words. Then when doing some physical excercise, I'm always the one who has to turn my head or peak if I'm not seeing the instructor, because I get unsure of what I'm hearing or if I understand it correctly, but then I also get it when I feel it and I often easily get things when someone corrects my position physically (like just putting a hand somewhere and telling, this is where the change should be) or says how it's supposed to feel. I can't think of other kinesthetic examples, but I know I do it.
One thing with me is that when someone says something to me it may take a while for me to process it.I have to think about it an analyze it.Not all the time of course but there times it falls into place but not at the very instant I hear it. I love reading but I do get impatient with instructions sometimes I skip over parts and sometimes find a shortcut if that's possible.

Thanks for the information the different ways people learn are fascinating.
 

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How one learns is correlated to perception.
Eh, that seems like a sketch connection.

How a person learns (learning style) isn't necessarily related to how they process the information they learn (MBTI).

Te might prefer facts as part of the learning process, but how those facts are delivered (auditory, visual, kinesthetic) seems less directly connected to the functions.
 

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I definitely prefer hands-on approach when it comes to learning. Until I try it singlehandedly I don't feel like I fully grasped it.

I can be quite robotic at times and just follow instructions step-by-step (especially if I don't care much about the task at hand), but it doesn't feel natural and doesn't make much sense. When people explain how something should be done and don't make me approach it and try it out, their words just go in one ear and out at the other, as when I finally get the chance to proceed with the task, my mind goes blank. I try to recreate what I've been shown or told and things just fall apart.

So, I usually prefer to go hands-on and in case I receive directions I'd like them to be given during the very process of mastering the task. This way I easily pick up on things, fill the blanks and missing parts of the instructions, things that were unsaid but implied. I need to get an inner understanding of how something is done and can't reach this state until I try to do it on my own or until I wouldn't come to it through the first-hand effort.
 

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kolb learning styles definitions and descriptions


Knowing a person's (and your own) learning style enables learning to be orientated according to the preferred method. That said, everyone responds to and needs the stimulus of all types of learning styles to one extent or another - it's a matter of using emphasis that fits best with the given situation and a person's learning style preferences.


Here are brief descriptions of the four Kolb learning styles:



  • Diverging (feeling and watching - CE/RO) - These people are able to look at things from different perspectives. They are sensitive. They prefer to watch rather than do, tending to gather information and use imagination to solve problems. They are best at viewing concrete situations several different viewpoints. Kolb called this style 'Diverging' because these people perform better in situations that require ideas-generation, for example, brainstorming. People with a Diverging learning style have broad cultural interests and like to gather information. They are interested in people, tend to be imaginative and emotional, and tend to be strong in the arts. People with the Diverging style prefer to work in groups, to listen with an open mind and to receive personal feedback.
  • Assimilating (watching and thinking - AC/RO) - The Assimilating learning preference is for a concise, logical approach. Ideas and concepts are more important than people. These people require good clear explanation rather than practical opportunity. They excel at understanding wide-ranging information and organising it a clear logical format. People with an Assimilating learning style are less focused on people and more interested in ideas and abstract concepts. People with this style are more attracted to logically sound theories than approaches based on practical value. These learning style people is important for effectiveness in information and science careers. In formal learning situations, people with this style prefer readings, lectures, exploring analytical models, and having time to think things through.
  • Converging (doing and thinking - AC/AE) - People with a Converging learning style can solve problems and will use their learning to find solutions to practical issues. They prefer technical tasks, and are less concerned with people and interpersonal aspects. People with a Converging learning style are best at finding practical uses for ideas and theories. They can solve problems and make decisions by finding solutions to questions and problems. People with a Converging learning style are more attracted to technical tasks and problems than social or interpersonal issues. A Converging learning style enables specialist and technology abilities. People with a Converging style like to experiment with new ideas, to simulate, and to work with practical applications.
  • Accommodating (doing and feeling - CE/AE) - The Accommodating learning style is 'hands-on', and relies on intuition rather than logic. These people use other people's analysis, and prefer to take a practical, experiential approach. They are attracted to new challenges and experiences, and to carrying out plans. They commonly act on 'gut' instinct rather than logical analysis. People with an Accommodating learning style will tend to rely on others for information than carry out their own analysis. This learning style is prevalent and useful in roles requiring action and initiative. People with an Accommodating learning style prefer to work in teams to complete tasks. They set targets and actively work in the field trying different ways to achieve an objective.

kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory and diagram
I would consider myself a mix of Assimilating and Converging. I learn a lot by just observation (but I have to be paying attention/actually care, not just mindlessly watching something), but ultimately, to refine/perfect it I also have to try to do it myself. When I actually learn something what ends up happening is that doing it reinforces my observations, and fills in details.

I think this is a very INTJ approach (especially considering there are actually studies now about how watching parallels doing as far as brain activity, but with less intensity than actually doing it - very Ni to inadvertently match brain study findings perfectly, lol) but I'm curious if others here are similar.
 
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I would consider myself a mix of Assimilating and Converging. I learn a lot by just observation (but I have to be paying attention/actually care, not just mindlessly watching something), but ultimately, to refine/perfect it I also have to try to do it myself. When I actually learn something what ends up happening is that doing it reinforces my observations, and fills in details.

I think this is a very INTJ approach (especially considering there are actually studies now about how watching parallels doing as far as brain activity, but with less intensity than actually doing it - very Ni to inadvertently match brain study findings perfectly, lol) but I'm curious if others here are similar.
When I did the inventory, I scored almost evenly between Accommodating and Converging.

Another interesting learning styles model is Anthony Gregorc's:

Mind Styles - Anthony Gregorc

I am usually between Concrete Random and Abstract Random.
 

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Not sure which sites you used for these but for mind styles on this site I got highest on Abstract Sequential followed by concrete sequential Check Your Personal Thinking Style
That's the one I used for mind styles too. Otherwise, I did the Kolb learning styles inventory through a supervisory leadership program at work.
 

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IDK you guys, the way she is describing it sounds insanely Si to me. Step by step, slow and steady, does not like to have any piece of information missing i.e. does not want to use intuition to jump to the next step, would rather just be given the solution in the most clear and efficient way, does not feel like the method is understood until it has been assimilated into the vast catalog of of introverted senses, and once it has been learned it's in there like it's in an iron safe.
 

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kolb learning styles definitions and descriptions


Knowing a person's (and your own) learning style enables learning to be orientated according to the preferred method. That said, everyone responds to and needs the stimulus of all types of learning styles to one extent or another - it's a matter of using emphasis that fits best with the given situation and a person's learning style preferences.


Here are brief descriptions of the four Kolb learning styles:



  • Diverging (feeling and watching - CE/RO) - These people are able to look at things from different perspectives. They are sensitive. They prefer to watch rather than do, tending to gather information and use imagination to solve problems. They are best at viewing concrete situations several different viewpoints. Kolb called this style 'Diverging' because these people perform better in situations that require ideas-generation, for example, brainstorming. People with a Diverging learning style have broad cultural interests and like to gather information. They are interested in people, tend to be imaginative and emotional, and tend to be strong in the arts. People with the Diverging style prefer to work in groups, to listen with an open mind and to receive personal feedback.
  • Assimilating (watching and thinking - AC/RO) - The Assimilating learning preference is for a concise, logical approach. Ideas and concepts are more important than people. These people require good clear explanation rather than practical opportunity. They excel at understanding wide-ranging information and organising it a clear logical format. People with an Assimilating learning style are less focused on people and more interested in ideas and abstract concepts. People with this style are more attracted to logically sound theories than approaches based on practical value. These learning style people is important for effectiveness in information and science careers. In formal learning situations, people with this style prefer readings, lectures, exploring analytical models, and having time to think things through.
  • Converging (doing and thinking - AC/AE) - People with a Converging learning style can solve problems and will use their learning to find solutions to practical issues. They prefer technical tasks, and are less concerned with people and interpersonal aspects. People with a Converging learning style are best at finding practical uses for ideas and theories. They can solve problems and make decisions by finding solutions to questions and problems. People with a Converging learning style are more attracted to technical tasks and problems than social or interpersonal issues. A Converging learning style enables specialist and technology abilities. People with a Converging style like to experiment with new ideas, to simulate, and to work with practical applications.
  • Accommodating (doing and feeling - CE/AE) - The Accommodating learning style is 'hands-on', and relies on intuition rather than logic. These people use other people's analysis, and prefer to take a practical, experiential approach. They are attracted to new challenges and experiences, and to carrying out plans. They commonly act on 'gut' instinct rather than logical analysis. People with an Accommodating learning style will tend to rely on others for information than carry out their own analysis. This learning style is prevalent and useful in roles requiring action and initiative. People with an Accommodating learning style prefer to work in teams to complete tasks. They set targets and actively work in the field trying different ways to achieve an objective.

kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory and diagram
I actually took this in grad school. I scored as a converger but reading the descriptions I think assimilator is the closest with secondary converger.

I don't need to feel things to learn them but I do need to think them through.
 
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