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Im learning ASL because i met a person who is deaf. Im learning JavaScript because I want to build my own website. I learned german in high school because I needed foreign language credits. I might learn Spanish because they teach it at the Y free. I might learn Japanese to visit japan in my future.

What are the reasons you learn the languages you learn?
 

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I might learn russian because I can make a good russian accent..
 

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I am not sure, I think I learn mostly for fun/interest, and it is much more fun now that I do it my own way, and focus on understanding and don't much on speaking and writing, which is much more effort for me. Perhaps I will do that later, once being able to understand the languages ok. I like the sounds of different languages, kind of like with music. It is also really interesting to see how things vary, a new language is in many ways a new way of thinking, to some degree. I also like to be able to read things or hear bits and be able to understand, part or all of it. It is nice not to be limited to sources from only one or two languages.

Half a year ago I made a plan to lear 13 languages, including those I know already, which covers large parts of the world, so tepping up my game in amount, but down in that I focus mostly on undestanding. I hope it will take under five years. I have only just begun many of them. So now my languages that I have started are, in this order: swedish(mothertongue), english(2nd), french(3rd), esperanto(4th), spanish(5th), russian(6th), german(7th), portugese(8th), chinese(9th), indonesian(10th), arabic (11th), italian (12th) (I tried but gave up high valyrian, it didn't stick at all, I just kept repeating things, haha) (I plan to add hindi and swahili once I have finished a few of these, pehaps japanese too eventually)

I use duolingo the most, but found some wordpractise called tofu language or something like that, to practise the chinese characters and words mostly, but there are other languages too, did a little russian vocabulary there too. Some youtube videos. lernu for esperanto, and reading wikipedia articles in esperanto(soon I am done with the esperanto duoligo course, then I'll try to find more real world uses for it). French I should start to do more with, before I forget again, read some books, I read some news from time to time, perhaps youtube etc, but haven't yet.
 

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Learned English because it’s literally everywhere, met a Syrian Arabic teacher and took lessons from them for the hell of it (they were out of work and I wanted to help, Arabic’s super hard and not many people speak it though), learned German a bit because it seemed like a useful language but rage-quit because of articles and how it grates on my ears.

Ever since I played Grim Fandango I’ve been in love with Spanish, the way it sounds is so lovely. Definitely going to learn it for fun if I ever get some free time. I don’t want to start it yet though, need to get better at Arabic first.
 

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I delve into Japanese regularly since I hear and see the language quite a bit in day to day life, so it's like.... I might as well learn it. There's a lot Japanese media, books and websites that don't have English translations or a dub so it'd be good to know the language. I would like to visit one day as well.
It'd be a future goal of mine to pass the JLPT-tests. I find it a fascinating language and fun challenge.

I know a tiny bit of Spanish from my ex who was Hispanic. I wanted to impress her and probably failed. lol
I really like the sound of Korean, French and Russian too. Those would be cool to learn but I'd need more reasons than that to dedicate the time to learn them.


I'd like to pick up at least one programming language eventually, since I think that's a pretty important modern skill to have.
Probably Python or Javascript. I'm pretty familiar with HTML and CSS and how that works at this point.



I am occasionally working towards building my own personal conlang for artistic purposes. I don't really expect that to be spoken by anyone else, but I have a lot of creative ideas on what to do with it.
 

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Something tells me that you will glance at Russian and Japanese and won't even learn their most basic levels (JLPT 5 and A1). Those suckers take years to get passable at.
That's what i did with mandarin. Too many vowel sounds for me. Japanese i like and already learned some basic stuff. Russian i just know "da" lol. I hope it wont be like that but something tells me i wont like it either.
 

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That's what i did with mandarin. Too many vowel sounds for me. Japanese i like and already learned some basic stuff. Russian i just know "da" lol. I hope it wont be like that but something tells me i wont like it either.
Knowing just da in Russian is certainly not good enough. You should know at least 500 common words, basics of using correct tenses, genders, know how to write Cyrillic. And even then you would be just some random urod from west. At that level you should learn one golden phrase "Ya neznayoo pa ruskij" and hopefully somebody will be able to converse with you in broken English. Here's some entertainment for learning Russian:

Don't even attempt going to Russia and say "cyka blyat", you will get punched into your nose. It's better to learn more. But if you are a tourist, then I would say that it's not worth it and you can rely on your phone for maps, sometimes for translations too. Even then you definitely must learn Russian letters to be able to understand street signs.

Japanese grammar is rather easy, but you really have to learn how to use particles, you have to get used to SOV (subject object verb) sentence structure, forget about times or already known details. You absolutely have to learn hiragana and katana ASAP, then get used to learning JLPT N5 kanjis as well as quickly understanding them in any form of written text.

You want to learn Japanese easier then be highly disciplined and every two weeks learn one lesson from Human Japanese app. This is pretty good balance between outright not learning and not being overwhelming and losing all your motivation. Don't even think that Duolingo or Rossetta Stone are good. They lack guidance and are better suited as being flashcard apps, even then they are frankly not very challenging. Don't buy Genki either, I generally find it not worth it. I saw it in local library and it wasn't great.

If you go to Japan and don't want to be kuso or even worse baka gaijin, then you should at least learn hiragana and katakana. Also be quiet and respectful. Nobody wants to deal with dipshits like Logan Paul or Ricegum. Kinda surprising that LP didn't got sued and jailed after him showing what he shouldn't.

If you want some tune for 5 hour katakana practice, listen to this:

It's something really unique to Japan.

Some people think that Wagakki Band might make it into Olympics:

Ganbatte!
 

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I started learning Japanese because it'd let me play games and watch things from Japan that never got a proper translation, and it's still a big reason but I've fallen in love with the country and its people through learning it so it's also now out of interest and so that I can talk to Japanese people. I've been very on-off with my studies though.

Something tells me that you will glance at Russian and Japanese and won't even learn their most basic levels (JLPT 5 and A1). Those suckers take years to get passable at.
That's what makes them interesting! The more different the language is from English the more fascinating it is, and kanji is just really cool, if a pain in the dick to learn.
 

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The spirit of the spirits
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I started learning Japanese because it'd let me play games and watch things from Japan that never got a proper translation
I just did that without a reason. I just find myself often seeing it, so I figured out that I should learn a bit of it.

I've fallen in love with the country and its people through learning it so it's also now out of interest and so that I can talk to Japanese people. I've been very on-off with my studies though.
Well, falling in love with country is fine, but are you sure that it's truly like you imagine it to be? Even if it's 21st century, it feels like all information about Japan is so hard to reach. Seemingly any real information, which is honest and not hidden is very hard to find and I have to say, that Japan ain't no wonderland. It's a country with real people and with real problems. As long as you know it it's okay to discover it, but still you shouldn't think of countries to be superior or inferior. Just a warning here.

If you find yourself lacking in motivation, have you considered learning it formally? I knew that I wouldn't be able to do it alone, so I wanted a push from someone else. It worked brilliantly. Formal education helped me to utilize my potential better. Might be helpful for you too.


That's what makes them interesting! The more different the language is from English the more fascinating it is, and kanji is just really cool, if a pain in the dick to learn.
I dunno, Russian isn't all that different from my native language, which is Lithuanian. They aren't in same language groups, but naturally there are some loan words and many grammatical similarities. It's more like the same thing, just you are noob and have to relearn all the basics. Many things during early de-sovietisation era were also imported here. Even if it's supposed to be different, it doesn't feel like it. I remember watching this with my grandparents on TV:

It's a weird thing tbh. Grandparents watched it, then my parents watched it and I watched it. I'm pretty sure that nearly every Russian kid has seen at least episode of Nu pogodi. it almost feels like entire world has seen it too. It was pretty common for a whole family to watch animation together.

And sometimes it's cool to just go to foreign country sometimes and enjoy similar to English language, which turns out to be nearly unidentifiable. In my case it was Spanish (Catalonian) and I expected it to be similar to English. It was nothing like English at all and I had a blast to learn some bits of it from just being there.

The only nice thing about learning languages that are considered very different and foreign from your own is that less people are aware of it and more people might perceive it as hard or incomprehensible. Basically, they will judge you less just because they can't really understand it. It's nice, but also is an enabler of lazy habits. Japanese isn't that hard. Grammar is usually very easy, words are learnable, kanjis are tedious but possible, pronunciation is easy too. I still haven't seen language harder than Lithuanian. There absolutely aren't easy parts of it. Everything is really hard about. Most of my classmate, which studied in elite high school still made just a tiny bit less than 10 mistakes in 10 sentence test. Lower end classes could make as many as 30 mistakes. Most of those mistakes don't affect readability. I haven't seen a single person in my life, who haven't made a single mistake at any Lithuanian language test. Not even once, unless teacher prepared intentionally easier test than it should be. It's a language, that is impossible for natives to learn. Japanese is pretty easy in comparison. It's even easy in comparison with English. In my studying time I haven't done more than 4 mistakes at any test.
 

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Well, falling in love with country is fine, but are you sure that it's truly like you imagine it to be? Even if it's 21st century, it feels like all information about Japan is so hard to reach. Seemingly any real information, which is honest and not hidden is very hard to find and I have to say, that Japan ain't no wonderland. It's a country with real people and with real problems. As long as you know it it's okay to discover it, but still you shouldn't think of countries to be superior or inferior. Just a warning here.
Of course no country is perfect, but you can still love it for its good aspects despite its flaws. Japan has HUGE problems that I take a lot of issue with but I feel a weird kind of kinship with it, I see a lot of my excessively polite behaviour and etiquette reflected in how people are expected to behave over there, and I've had nothing but great experiences with all the Japanese people I've spoken to. I've seen Japan called the Britain of the East before and collectivism aside I think that's true in a lot of ways. I know it's not the romanticised country Japanophiles think it is, having learned about the country in my studies and elsewhere I think I know it quite well.

If you find yourself lacking in motivation, have you considered learning it formally? I knew that I wouldn't be able to do it alone, so I wanted a push from someone else. It worked brilliantly. Formal education helped me to utilize my potential better. Might be helpful for you too.
If you mean learning in a class room naahh, that would never ever work for me. Classrooms expect all their students to learn the same way and that doesn't work, different people learn best in different ways, and I need to do things at my own pace. Plus I have attention span problems that are exacerbated in that kind of setting. I have a great online tutor who's from Japan and that's as far as I'll go.

I dunno, Russian isn't all that different from my native language, which is Lithuanian. They aren't in same language groups, but naturally there are some loan words and many grammatical similarities. It's more like the same thing, just you are noob and have to relearn all the basics. Many things during early de-sovietisation era were also imported here. Even if it's supposed to be different, it doesn't feel like it. I remember watching this with my grandparents on TV:
Ah yeah true, I wasn't thinking about the fact that not everyone reading is from the anglosphere, my B. At the same time though I think that's interesting in its own way if you're into language and linguistics, because it gives you a window into how languages diversify. I'd assume Lithuanian and Russian developed from a common language, and by learning Russian it's almost like you're piecing that extinct language back together.

And sometimes it's cool to just go to foreign country sometimes and enjoy similar to English language, which turns out to be nearly unidentifiable. In my case it was Spanish (Catalonian) and I expected it to be similar to English. It was nothing like English at all and I had a blast to learn some bits of it from just being there.
Haha yeah Spanish is quite different from English, I'm surprised you thought they'd be similar! English has a lot of words that originated in early French, which developed from Latin like Spanish did, but since English is mostly Germanic that's about where the similarities end. IMO languages like Dutch and Yiddish are much closer to English, especially Yiddish. Some parts of sentences in it literally just sound like English to me. Frisian is the language(s) most closely related to English but it sounds quite different.

The only nice thing about learning languages that are considered very different and foreign from your own is that less people are aware of it and more people might perceive it as hard or incomprehensible. Basically, they will judge you less just because they can't really understand it. It's nice, but also is an enabler of lazy habits. Japanese isn't that hard. Grammar is usually very easy, words are learnable, kanjis are tedious but possible, pronunciation is easy too. I still haven't seen language harder than Lithuanian. There absolutely aren't easy parts of it. Everything is really hard about. Most of my classmate, which studied in elite high school still made just a tiny bit less than 10 mistakes in 10 sentence test. Lower end classes could make as many as 30 mistakes. Most of those mistakes don't affect readability. I haven't seen a single person in my life, who haven't made a single mistake at any Lithuanian language test. Not even once, unless teacher prepared intentionally easier test than it should be. It's a language, that is impossible for natives to learn. Japanese is pretty easy in comparison. It's even easy in comparison with English. In my studying time I haven't done more than 4 mistakes at any test.
I don't think that's true, it can also just be out of interest if you find languages interesting. I love language, so I find languages that are really different from English fascinating, especially if they developed completely separately from English too, because then it almost feels completely alien. Most European languages developed from Proto-Indo-European, and since they're the languages we're used to hearing I think we assume on some level that all languages follow the rules European languages do, but then languages like Japanese, Mandarin, Korean, African languages etc completely turn that expectation on their head, and show you how a completely alien group of people on the other side of the world developed through time in their own way. Writing systems are especially fascinating because we think of language in terms of our alphabets-letter-by-letter, using letters to make sounds, when outside of our bubble there are languages like Japanese that use syllabaries which limit the sounds they can make, or like Arabic that use abjads where vowels don't exist, or like Chinese languages which don't even have pronunciation-based characters at all and the writing system is a whole language in itself.

Woah, nerded out a bit too much there. But yeah, by that logic no language is difficult, because it's all just a matter of spending time with it. It's all about memorisation. Memorising 2200 kanji is very, very hard, especially if you have poor memory. Just like learning to spell with Tibetan or Thai is nigh impossible unless you have the memory of a god. I'm sure if I had the interest to I could learn Lithuanian without too much trouble, as long as I spend enough time with it to be able to memorise it.
 

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Of course no country is perfect, but you can still love it for its good aspects despite its flaws. Japan has HUGE problems that I take a lot of issue with but I feel a weird kind of kinship with it, I see a lot of my excessively polite behaviour and etiquette reflected in how people are expected to behave over there, and I've had nothing but great experiences with all the Japanese people I've spoken to. I've seen Japan called the Britain of the East before and collectivism aside I think that's true in a lot of ways. I know it's not the romanticised country Japanophiles think it is, having learned about the country in my studies and elsewhere I think I know it quite well.
Good. I have no idea why it's considered the UK of east tho. Never heard of it.

To some extent I'm aware of several problems with Japan:
Overworking
Fakeness
Perversion
Some corruption of higher ups
Broken jail system
Con artists
Tokyo
Suicides
Quite awful depression
No free time
Stupid consumerism
Excessive accesorizing
Education system
NEETs
Declining companies (like Sony, Honda, Toyota, Toshiba, Sega...)
General expenses
Strong gang mentality
Plastic pollution
You are forever nothing
Culture of drinking
Weird Japanese versions of western culture
Bureaucracy
NHK
Dying car culture
Crowds
Youtube (actually mostly UUUM)
Too many bright signs and sounds
Lack of insulation
Geographic location (earthquakes, tsunamis, typhoons and other bullshit)
No trash cans
Over the top slipper culture
General spinelessness
English translations
Lack of culture of making food at home
Unregulated smoking behaviour
Pachinko
Wastefulness
Expectations
Overly hi-tech stuff and overly low tech stuff
Land of midgets and dwarfs (only relevant for foreigners)


If you mean learning in a class room naahh, that would never ever work for me. Classrooms expect all their students to learn the same way and that doesn't work, different people learn best in different ways, and I need to do things at my own pace. Plus I have attention span problems that are exacerbated in that kind of setting. I have a great online tutor who's from Japan and that's as far as I'll go.
Well I had 45 min lessons 4 days per weak in my university and they gave me a needed push. However I'm aware, that most of my work was done at home (like 5 hours of homework). Still, I think it was a good introduction for further individual learning.


Ah yeah true, I wasn't thinking about the fact that not everyone reading is from the anglosphere, my B. At the same time though I think that's interesting in its own way if you're into language and linguistics, because it gives you a window into how languages diversify. I'd assume Lithuanian and Russian developed from a common language, and by learning Russian it's almost like you're piecing that extinct language back together.
No, just no. Russian and Lithuanian technically have very different roots and are in no way similar. It's just that after soviet occupation many Russian words were integrated into our language. Well not integrated, but just widely used. Those make up a lot of slang and maybe only slowly is fading away.

Lithuanian language and culture is actually in some ways similar to Japan's. It's one of the oldest cultures in Europe and for very long time existed in relative isolation. Early Balts lived in very dense forests and there weren't many open spaces. Due to that many other European nations either assumed that this land is uninhabitable or some wild tribes live there. However, that wasn't exactly true. Balts lived pretty well and very decently civilized. They had rich resources of natural food. Pretty much until 1400s were really isolated from other Europeans.

Balt language is very old and barely anything is known about its early development. What is known now is that it at some point started to develop from generic Indoeuropean language foundations. Later it just developed in isolation for many years. Generally it was only used as oral language. Written texts of it only appeared after other European nations already had it. Thus most letters were adopted from other Latin based languages. Grammar, words and pronunciation more or less survived until now with minimal changes. Language itself was pretty resistant to any effects of other languages, thus it has its own strong identity. It only had to endure strong Russification during soviet era and maybe some Polification during earlier times.

There are no known languages linguistically similar to Lithuanian, except Latvian. However, some experts say that it may have some similarities to Sanskrit. And the only reason why Latvian language is similar to Lithuanina is that Lithuania itself wasn't a thing until 1000s. Balts lived in many tribes and they were like their own countries. In current Latvian territory lived same Baltic tribes. There were maybe 15-20 of those tribes. Latvia became a thing after Livonian Order. Rest of the Balts remained quite individualistic and didn't give a fuck about being in a countries. But that became a problem in Europe and Balts were united into Grand Duchy of Lithuania. It remained heavily decentralized with many local authorities. However after many years and attempts to assassinate the knight, after around 100 years to be exact, it just sort of stayed. And thus Lithuania became a thing.

From what I know, slavic countries initially lived in east and after many years began to go to west. I don't remember much, but I think it could have been constant wars from east (Mongolians). So those had no influence of Lithuanian culture or language shaping.

Historically, it also helped that Lithuanian armies were pretty strong and could defend themselves well. Not only that, but also invade many foreign territories. Such quality lasted for a long time, but in late 1700s when other countries mastered the art of war it was the end of our country for many years. But to be honest, if you take away country from nation of introverts, then it doesn't really matter. It will live inside of them for many centuries. That's why it was recovered many times and remained highly unaffected by outside influence.

Also our language is somewhat foreign-phobic too. Many foreign words sounds awful if you use them with Lithuanian, so there are two ways to localize them. Use Lithuanian ends of words and keep the root of word original or invent our own words. Most people accepted the first method due to practicality. However, second method is loved by linguists and sometimes they make pretty good local words, but other times they create such abominations that no Lithuanian can understand them or they sound just ridiculously silly. Many of them became an embarrassing laughingstock on national level. Probably the most embarrassing one was when they had to localize computer terms and they localized word for monitor. It became "vaizduoklis" (a thing that shows images, while it makes sense in literal translation, it just sounds ridiculous and overly complicated in Lithuanian) and unsurprisingly was never used again. And after such massive fuck ups reputation of linguists sank very low.


Haha yeah Spanish is quite different from English, I'm surprised you thought they'd be similar!
You should thank internet for that. Also for saying that Spanish is one language.


English has a lot of words that originated in early French, which developed from Latin like Spanish did, but since English is mostly Germanic that's about where the similarities end.
I think I have read somewhere that English also has variants like Olde English and Middle English and that initial English was somewhat local product too. I think that my English teacher once told us in lesson something about English runes. But all I remember, is that English is an international mess and now is a very distinct language. And I think I had to learn that UK is also a mixture of Scotts, Welsh, English... That's why it's not called England, but UK. Still in my country everyone just calls it "Anglija" (England) and it sounds similar to Lithuanian word for coal (in singular) "anglis" :D.

IMO languages like Dutch and Yiddish are much closer to English, especially Yiddish. Some parts of sentences in it literally just sound like English to me. Frisian is the language(s) most closely related to English but it sounds quite different.
I remember a moment when I was in school and kids could choose to either learn Russian or German. I choose Russian and after many years I saw open textbook of German. There was vocabulary and like 40% of words looked like English knock-off. You could only imagine me having a massive FUUUU moment, when I realized that German was very similar to English and I suffered many years in Russian classes.

Last year I tried out German on Rosetta Stone app and I learned it a bit. All I remember is 'wasser und brot' and 'der medchen list', oh and "scheisse" from a bit more advanced materials. I just found it boring after two days and never touched it again.


I don't think that's true, it can also just be out of interest if you find languages interesting. I love language, so I find languages that are really different from English fascinating, especially if they developed completely separately from English too, because then it almost feels completely alien. Most European languages developed from Proto-Indo-European, and since they're the languages we're used to hearing I think we assume on some level that all languages follow the rules European languages do, but then languages like Japanese, Mandarin, Korean, African languages etc completely turn that expectation on their head, and show you how a completely alien group of people on the other side of the world developed through time in their own way. Writing systems are especially fascinating because we think of language in terms of our alphabets-letter-by-letter, using letters to make sounds, when outside of our bubble there are languages like Japanese that use syllabaries which limit the sounds they can make, or like Arabic that use abjads where vowels don't exist, or like Chinese languages which don't even have pronunciation-based characters at all and the writing system is a whole language in itself.
That's nice, I agree. But as learner, I must say that learning something really foreign just feels like actual learning, meanwhile learning something similar just feels like a waste of time. Also learning very foreign language forces one to be very careful about its basic again, something that you won't feel while learning German as English speaker, where you can just assume many things and be mostly right.

Woah, nerded out a bit too much there.
I love nerding outs. Do it more, sempai.


But yeah, by that logic no language is difficult, because it's all just a matter of spending time with it. It's all about memorisation. Memorising 2200 kanji is very, very hard, especially if you have poor memory. Just like learning to spell with Tibetan or Thai is nigh impossible unless you have the memory of a god. I'm sure if I had the interest to I could learn Lithuanian without too much trouble, as long as I spend enough time with it to be able to memorise it.
Well, you just have to weight pros and cons of each language. The only difficult thing about Japanese is being smooth in SOV and remembering kanjis. Everything else is pretty easy. In Russian vocabulary is moderately difficult, grammar can be hard, but generally it's learnable language. Lithuanian has moderately difficult vocabulary, grammar is hard, pronunciation system is probably hardest on Earth, punctuation is nearly impossible, letters are kind of easy to learn but not to use, morphology is easy, syntax is complicated but rich. So Lithuanian is easily the hardest, Russian is in the middle and Japanese is rather easy.

You think that remembering kanjis is hard, but I think that knowing genders, singular plural, times, cases is pretty difficult. Then on top of that add a dictionary of stresses, extensive list of sentence syntax, textbook of exceptions because apparently every rule has shit ton of them, another book of should you write two words separately or together because they sound the same, another book for writing ia or j, another book of using correct moods, another book for using correct extended letters and prolonged letters...

Nah, Japanese is pretty easy. Some people have said that Lithuanian language is like a song and the truth is that it has more rules than actual note script. And practically nothing can't be just known from context as every single detail must be said. That's why you can know gender, marital status, family just from last name alone. You can even get pretty good idea of person's age too. There's just so much data crammed into each word and that requires rules to exist. On the other hand in Japanese each word just generally introduces you to a general idea of what is being said, but nothing too specific is often mentioned. Even if you want to say that there are apples on table in Japan it's the same thing as one apple on table and even if it will be on it. In Lithuania, you must know a gender of apple(s), specific time when it is on table, number of apples, if apple is cute or not, size of apple, whether it's brute/big or small, whether apple is bossy or not, whether it is an apple or whether it's for standing apple you look like you are looking at it, and goddammit maybe there's a glitch in matrix and apple is in table and you know what apples are sensitive so if you are looking at it then your previous sentence (there's an apple) is all wrong.

There are all those forms here:
Ant stalo stovi obuolys
Ant stalo stovi obuolė (incorrect gender)

And stalo stovi obuoliai (plural)

Ant stalo stovėjo obuolys (past)
Ant stalo stovės obuolys (future)
Ant stalo stovėdavo obuolys (plural past)

Ant stalo stovi obuoliukas (cute)

Ant stalo stovi obuoliukas (it's also small)

Ant stalo stovi obuolys (may also mean brute or big)
Ant stalo yra išsidrėbęs obuolys (very brute form)

Ant stalo stovi gerbiamasis obuolys (honorific form)

Žėk, ant stalo yr obuolys (when you talk like teenage dirtbag)

Ant stalo stovėjusiam obuoliui (for who in the past)

Aš matau ant stalo stovintį obuolį (I see apple on table)

Obuolys ant stalo (shortened form of apple is standing on table reduced to apple on table)

Obuolys stale (apple in table, glitch in matrix)

O, obuolys ant stalo (oh, apple on table)
Aš matau obuolį ant stalo (I see apple on table)

Čia obuolys (if you give no fucks about details and like to point your finger at things)

And honestly this would be still the same sentence in Japanese. Something like ringo wo ue teeburu desu or as little as ringo desu.
 

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I learned english from TV and video games. By the time the internet became a popular enough engine for social interaction, i spoke it fluently enough without any kind of academic instruction. I'm still not sure how that happened. :distant:
 

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I learned english from TV and video games. By the time the internet became a popular enough engine for social interaction, i spoke it fluently enough without any kind of academic instruction. I'm still not sure how that happened. :distant:
Well, same way a baby learns their native language before they even reach school. Hours of exposure.
And I would assume you had fun while taking the language in, which is definitely the best means for acquisition...

When you listen to an unfamiliar language, the words all just seem to blend together in a mess of incomprehensible sounds, and the native speakers seem very fast too at first.
But once you get the basics down of how the language sounds, how basic sentences work grammatically and your vocabulary has widened enough to where you can detect where common words begin and end in a sentence then the brain will just slowly piece things together.
Especially if you have media that will give you context clues.
 

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Well, same way a baby learns their native language before they even reach school. Hours of exposure.
And I would assume you had fun while taking the language in, which is definitely the best means for acquisition...

When you listen to an unfamiliar language, the words all just seem to blend together in a mess of incomprehensible sounds, and the native speakers seem very fast too at first.
But once you get the basics down of how the language sounds, how basic sentences work grammatically and your vocabulary has widened enough to where you can detect where common words begin and end in a sentence then the brain will just slowly piece things together.
Especially if you have media that will give you context clues.
Maybe, but i'm guessing doing this at a young age is vital. Because for the past 10 years or so (20 to 30), i've watched subbed japanese anime from time to time without similar effects. I've picked up a japanese word or two, but that's about it.
 

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♂️ INFJ 5w4 // IEI-Ni
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Maybe, but i'm guessing doing this at a young age is vital. Because for the past 10 years or so (20 to 30), i've watched subbed japanese anime from time to time without similar effects. I've picked up a japanese word or two, but that's about it.

It can be beneficial to start out with a younger brain but I wouldn't say that's vital. It's more that kids have the advantage of having constant exposure and guidance from their parents or guardians than some foreign adult likely will. You have to be a bit more self-determined and consistent in your learning as an adult, that's all. There are some advantages an adult will have over a child.

You can't just rely on casually watching some anime in subs "from time to time" if you wanted to seriously learn the language. You need to be more dedicated than that.

Japanese in particular is very different from a Germanic or Latinate language. So if you started out with Dutch, German, Spanish or French then picking up English would definitely be much easier as an auxiliary since a lot of words are familiar. Japanese will take significantly longer.

Japanese I think is often estimated to take a native English speaker about over 2200+ study hours to get proficiently fluent. So depending on how committed you are, you could get reasonably proficient in about a year.
In comparison, it takes about 600 hours / 23-24 weeks on average for an English speaker to get reasonably proficient at languages like Dutch or French.

That's why on top of consistently consuming Japanese media daily to help with listening skills, you should also do regular study, like taking a structured course based around your current level.
 

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Motivation in learning languages...

So...well...
For the course of the holidays two years ago I kinda became obsessed with YouTube... But it all turned out great and all...I mean...I speak English better than anyone in my class, but I guess I could still put some work into it and consolidate it. Well... my mother language is Slovene, 2nd language English and 3rd German. I'm just learning German at a Grammar school in Austria and...it's hella hard. Like how can I cope with native speakers?? It's pretty damn hard and I'm not even that interested in learning it, but I guess I need to. I am on a long journey to find a source of motivation or something... I'm just terribly lacking it. I would learn languages like Japanese, since I love anime and the culture, but apart from that... Is that enough of a reason? I always think, that if I won't really need the language that frequently i my life, it's not worth learning it. Idk...What do you guys think? Is it enough of a reason?
 

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Maybe, but i'm guessing doing this at a young age is vital. Because for the past 10 years or so (20 to 30), i've watched subbed japanese anime from time to time without similar effects. I've picked up a japanese word or two, but that's about it.
I don't mean to argue with that, cause you're completely right, that doing this at a young age is vital, but you would probably improve way more, if you would be surrounded by actual people speaking only Japanese, that you would need to interact and communicate with. That's literally how babies feel. Lol
 
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