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Hi! :)

I was wondering if there are any vegans in this group!
I would just like to know about your stories of how you came to be a vegan and your experiences in general!

Thanks! :kitteh:


(Not looking for debates between omnivores and vegans etc. here, so please don't comment if you aren't vegan/if what you want to say is against vegans.)
 
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Hey! I've been vegan for around 6 years.

I became vegan because my friend was considering it and she showed me all the information about it. It wasn't very hard at all, even with me having been eating animals beforehand. I had never liked meat so it wasn't a big change for me. The biggest challenge was just learning how to cook for myself because, being young, I was mostly reliant on other people or packaged food that usually contains some sort of animal product. But I learned a lot from it and definitely eat a lot healthier than I would have otherwise!
 

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Hello! I've been vegan for eight months now and it's the best damn decision I ever made. For some reason it was very easy for me, once I opened my eyes and saw what our meat-eating society does to the planet and the animals I never looked back. My mom is vegan too now!
 
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In England a vegan is someone who doesn't eat any meat or use any animal products including wearing leather or drinking milk, eating cheese etc. A vegetarian doesn't eat meat (that includes fish). A pescatarian doesn't eat meat except for fish and everyone else is an omnivore.

So, a vegan tuna recipe isn't possible strictly speaking. What is the other definition of vegan (ie widely accepted definition) because it doesn't seem clear?
 

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In England a vegan is someone who doesn't eat any meat or use any animal products including wearing leather or drinking milk, eating cheese etc. A vegetarian doesn't eat meat (that includes fish). A pescatarian doesn't eat meat except for fish and everyone else is an omnivore.

So, a vegan tuna recipe isn't possible strictly speaking. What is the other definition of vegan (ie widely accepted definition) because it doesn't seem clear?
If you are referring to WhateverLolaWants' post, I believe the recipe didn't actually have tuna in it, so it's vegan :)




I myself am a vegetarian who doesn't eat dairy products because of being allergic to them. I've been thinking of becoming a vegan though, since I rarely eat eggs anyway, so most of my meals are vegan already. I've been a vegetarian for about 3-4 years now, I started when I was 16 when my mom decided to stop eating meat. I just kind of went along with that because I always felt bad for eating it. I don't think I could ever go back, I just feel so good about my diet right now!
 

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If you are referring to WhateverLolaWants' post, I believe the recipe didn't actually have tuna in it, so it's vegan :)




I myself am a vegetarian who doesn't eat dairy products because of being allergic to them. I've been thinking of becoming a vegan though, since I rarely eat eggs anyway, so most of my meals are vegan already. I've been a vegetarian for about 3-4 years now, I started when I was 16 when my mom decided to stop eating meat. I just kind of went along with that because I always felt bad for eating it. I don't think I could ever go back, I just feel so good about my diet right now!
Ah, okay thanks for clearing that up
 

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My husband and I are both vegans.

It was a gradual process for me. When I was a child, my family raised animals for food, and my aversion to meat began there. I grew attached to them despite my parents telling me "they aren't pets," and "If you must name them, name them after foods." The pigs were especially precious because they liked music and were social beings with distinct personalities. At some point during my childhood, I started refusing to eat meals that I knew came from animals I had cared for, eating instead things I was able to fix for myself. I didn't know about the cruelty of the dairy and egg industries yet, so these were often centered around cheese or eggs.

Even this was problematic. My grandparents saw my refusal of meat as a rejection of God because their religious beliefs were anti-vegetarian. They also thought I was being picky and rude. I still ate very little meat, mostly compromising by tolerating fishes or chickens in order to avoid inconveniencing others. During this time, I became strongly addicted to fancy cheeses. When I went off to college, I started eating more meat in order to fit in. I met my very first vegan there, but still didn't understand why a person would give up dairy products. I had a false idea of how such foods were acquired, and imagined happy pet cows giving up their milk freely without any being harmed in the process. I didn't consider it polite to ask, so I gave up an opportunity to be educated about how the dairy industry breaks up families, treats males as disposable and exploits the reproductive processes of females. I still believed, on some level, that being desensitized was an acceptable goal, especially since I was still seen as picky whenever I rejected meat. I was determined to become less of a social burden. However, I later realized that shutting off my conscience wasn't a good goal.

Later, while in a very liberal city, I came across a book with art by Sue Coe. Her art resonated with me very powerfully because of my upbringing and some of the things I had witnessed as a child. When I saw it, my conscience was convicted and I instantly decided I was going to become a vegetarian. I was most of the way there anyhow, so that part was easy. While I was learning about ways to defend my vegetarianism to those who might criticize me for it, I started reading more about animal rights issues and soon realized why it was important to become a vegan for the sake of the animals. I tried several times to give up cheese, failing repeatedly because the addiction was so strong, and because I felt like a complete failure every time I gave in to temptation. When I saw myself as fundamentally corrupt, I felt less capable of changing, and the stress of self-hatred for not being able to do it perfectly and instantly only made it more difficult. It took me over a decade, but I kept trying despite how hard it was to overcome. I knew it was important and that I had no right to cause that kind of suffering with my choices.

I still have dreams about eating dairy products, especially cheese, which was my favorite food. It has been over three years since I first succeeded at becoming a vegan, and I have no intention of ever turning back.
 

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Eventually I would like to become vegan.Ordinarily I won't eat meat but I seem to end up with pepperoni in my cart every time I go shopping.
 

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I was born vegetarian (my parents insisted I eat meat, but I spat it in the trash). I was finally 'allowed' to be vegetarian at age 12, so 9 years ago. :) I was vegan for a few months, but have been slipping up lately (with cheese....). I very much want to be 100% vegan, because I do not want to cause harm to animals, who are precious to me. I will be very soon, I hope!
 
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