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1) Open a web browser
2) Find the website of the software you want
3) Find the download page for that software
4) Download an installer
5) Run the installer
6) tell Windows that, yes, you want to run the program you told it to run
7) Click "next" or "continue" several times
8) Delete the installer
You forgot 'reboot the PC', although that isn't a requirement as much as it used to be


The reason I find things easier in Linux is that the software I need to perform a certain function is usually not installed on Windows. I have to go find one, hopefully a free one, that's not crippled shareware. And then I have to hope that it doesn't slip spyware on my machine.

Linux distributions include ALOT of software. Many of the programs I need are already installed. If not, it's usually a one-line command to install it like you pointed out. If you aren't comfortable with the command line, there are gui-tools to do the same.

Yes Linux has a learning curve, and that's what turns people off mostly
 

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tl;dr answer, linux but it's because I don't trust either Microsoft or Apple (or any giant company for that matter). I also like linux because if something isn't working you can fix it. If you try to fix it and you didn't, it was your own fault for not having the right knowledge (I still run into this often enough, actually).

Long answer cos I was bored and if nothing else is shown in my history it should be that if decide to be all fanboy about the tools you use you just end up limiting yourself. You have no idea what tools might be available in the future -- Commodore was the be all and end all in the early 80's and these days I'm sure most people wouldn't recognize a C64 if they tripped over it.

---

I cut my teeth on Apple ][e's when I was in grade 5. I learned how to use Commodore 64's and Atari's as well back in the day before I was 10. In my teens I had a Coleco Adam (my first computer, it used tapes!) until I could afford my own IBM Ambra 386sx25 that cost me about $1800 at the time. Came with a giant 160MB hard drive.

I learned DOS and Windows 3.1 at the time, and my friend showed me how god-damn awesome Amiga's were and I always regretted having a PC. I also learned Mac OS 7 (Mac SE/30 are amazing little machines) about this point as well as learned how to use the VAX/VMS system my high school had.

I ended up taking networking in a business college to round out my computer knowledge, and learned Netware 3.12 and Windows NT 3.51. I learned Windows NT 4 on the job after that, cursing and hating Windows 95 the whole time -- I pillaged a copy of NT4 workstation for my home machine rather than use the POS that Windows 95 was -- 98 was eventually better, but that's like saying getting punched in the face is better than getting kicked in the nuts. It IS better, but it's better to not get kicked in the first place!

I started to dabble with Macs seriously at this point and got myself one of the original Bondi Blue iMacs and did a lot of hacking and support on it .. rev a and b had an undocumented port that I got a voodoo2 (old school even then!) card that was a heck of a lot better than the Rage Pro (with 6MB of RAM!). I helped a lot of people get their own working after I figured my own out.

A G4 Mac was my next upgrade, but I also dabbled in Windows 2000 on the PC side. Windows 2000 was my OS of choice for probably 5 years, long after XP was released mostly because of the just terrible looking UI that XP had. I had a number of iBooks and MacBooks over the next couple of years, but would never use them as my main machine -- I've always enjoyed playing games too much to make the break fully from Windows. It was also losing my G4 that moved through OSX 10.0 through 10.3 that spurred me to start learning linux.

I've been bouncing back and forth between Windows and different linux distros until now a days the only thing my Windows partition has on it now is Windows 7 and a Steam folder that's about 200GB. Everything else is all on the linux side that is running Ubuntu 9.10 these days. But even Canonical has been starting to make decisions and basically tell the community to deal with thier decisions. Might be time for just plain ol' Debian.

As for Apple versus Microsoft, don't emotionally invest in either company because they sure don't care about you -- Microsoft shows thier disdain for thier customers with the 'Genuine Windows Advantage', requiring users to activate online and to justify themselves on the phone if Microsoft deems you must do so, among other issues.

Apple's own disdain is far stronger, but the people are vastly more accepting of it -- Apple doesn't want people using their OS, they want to lock them in to the Apple lifestyle with Mac computers that can only stream media to other Apple devices that are tied to accounts that they can control buying software from sites that only have what they want to sell (Microsoft also has this on the 360, but that's another story/rant).

It's a perfect corporate consumer environment. And I like to think that I'm not that much of a happy little consumer (aside from that 200GB of Steam games).
 

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I'm a PC user, because I like the compatibility, availability, and adaptability. I'm also a bit of a gamer. If I wanted to do graphics I'd go Mac. If I wanted to program I'd go Linux.

I have to say though, the Apple cult is a little scary. It's the reason I refuse to get an iPhone. Or an iPod. Or anything with the little "i" preceding it. I'M ON TO YOUR PLAN, APPLE!!!!

And now, for some humor.
 

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Like most everybody, I started with Windows. I do tech support on them, and supplement my income by fixing them... so I still like em. =] Got banana bread tonight for a fix I did the other day. And it's delicious.

Let's see...
I then moved to Ubuntu (Linux) and enjoyed tweaking it a lot! (On my Dell, and my Alienware). Everything I needed to be working on my system was already included in the distro. I've seen other installs that needed tweaking. Contrary to what most people perceive about Linux, It's not all code and command line anymore. It actually has a much better GUI than any Windows layout I have ever used. IMHO it's graphical layout and user friendliness is equal to, or better than Mac and Windows combined in some cases.

I'd guess that only about 10% of the Ubuntu installs have something to setup such as wireless drivers, keyboards, mouse pads or something like that. Everyone else should just expect to install and have no issues. Also Linux systems can be incredibly fast.

I still have a Dell that I use, but about 2 years ago or so I took Windows completely off of it, and moved to Linux all together. I'm currently typing this reply on a Dell Inspiron with the beta Ubuntu 10.4 Lucid Lynx that officially comes out at the end of the month. Again, everything worked on the install, so loving it.

Hackintosh anybody? I read up a few days ago on setting up a Hackintosh (PC with Mac OS) on the Dell here, and it looks pretty easy to do. So might wait till the end of the month when the actual release of Lucid Lynx comes out, and do a dual boot, Hackintosh and Linux.

And now on to Mac.

Being that I loved Linux, and was having problems running my DJ software on my Alienware, I saved up and bought one of the new Macbook Pro Unibody 17" beauties. Upgraded the ram to 8GB DDR3, and slapped in a Samsung 256GB SSD.

The other thing I love about my Mac, is that I type in the keyboard layout called Dvorak. On my Alien, couldn't physically move and rearrange the keys, so had to use stickers. On the Dell, I had to shave off part of a few keys to get them rearranged. On the Mac, they all got rearranged without any hassle.

It's the most amazing computer I've ever used, and highly recommend. Yes they are expensive, and bang for the buck you could build a Desktop system that would smoke it... but you definitely get what you pay for.

So there you go. My 3 cents. Anyone by chance heard of the Malibal Laptops? Can only use Windows on em, (or Linux I suppose) but they outperform Alienware PC's all day long.

- Pixel -
 

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I have to say though, the Apple cult is a little scary. It's the reason I refuse to get an iPhone. Or an iPod. Or anything with the little "i" preceding it.
I have a Mac, and I'm still with you on that one.

However, I DO have an iPhone. But I'm using T-mobile, not AT&T.

Jailbroke & Unlocked FTW!

- Pixel -
 

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After graduation I'll learn my way around linux. I've already used IRC to download things so I know the navigation commands at least.

For now it's PC largely because my parents bought my computers for the first half of my electronic travels but back then the games I wanted to play weren't compatible on Macs anyway. Now I just don't buy one because I would need to relearn all my shortcuts and find a new ocean of little freeware programs I use for various things, (and not the type I want running in emulation.)

Plus I was late enough onto the scene of even looking at Mac that they smell like a giant corporation to me instead of the rebel option I hear they got popular on. Not that Windows isn't but I don't expect to be happy switching between cold giants anymore.
 

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Hackintosh anybody? I read up a few days ago on setting up a Hackintosh (PC with Mac OS) on the Dell here, and it looks pretty easy to do. So might wait till the end of the month when the actual release of Lucid Lynx comes out, and do a dual boot, Hackintosh and Linux.
I'll try it if you try it. Send me a visitor message when you're installing it?

Besides being able to rearrange the keys, what do you like so much about your Mac?
 

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I'll try it if you try it. Send me a visitor message when you're installing it?

Besides being able to rearrange the keys, what do you like so much about your Mac?
DEAL!

The size is nice and thin. Also is pretty light for a 17". The brush aluminum design is very strong, and has almost no chassis flex. (I've seen integrated graphics cards pull their traces off the main PCB because of flex.)

I spent extra and bought the anti-glare screen, and never have to stare at my reflection while typing or browsing.

The Dual graphics cards are great, (a 256 shared, and 512 dedicated DDR3 setup) so if I'm running my Traktor Scratch Pro software, I have enough power to run the on board display, and still send the same image out to a 45" monitor without having to use a scan converter or a DA. That, and my video never lags.

The magnetic power cord has saved me from snagging it and damaging something on the computer more than once... and I'm like obsessively careful with my computer.

The track pad is HUGE! and the glass surface makes it feel like you're navigating on silk. Nothing about it feels cheap. Even typing feels silky some how. Also the gestures on the multi-touch pad are very natural to get used to, and help for faster and more efficient work.

Love the back-lit keyboard.

The processor in mine is the T-9600 which has impressive benchmarks. I seldomly see the spinning wheel. I also upgraded the RAM to 8GB of DDR3 @ 1066... which allowed me to over allocate RAM to Java for intensive apps and games.

Also added in a Samsung 256GB Solid State Drive. Benchmark is write 120mbps, read 210 mbps. Friend with same laptop, but the stock drive benchmarked 40 / 50. So it's very very very fast. Again, which is great for my DJing software which has intensive I/O processing thru an external audio card, (at 1ms latency, but run at 2.5 for added stability) as well as 2 usb MIDI controllers. Have never had this software crash on me.

Not that I'm planning on it, but resale value on Macs are also a perk. My Dell isn't worth what I paid to upgrade the processor and RAM anymore.

Love having terminal, and actually keep my updates on. Every 3 weeks or so it finds an update for me. The last one that popped up... Critical update? Security threat? Nope. They found a way to get my bluetooth keyboard's batteries to last longer. That was my update lol.

Basically, Mac doesn't produce a bottom end machine. They use quality and current high end technology, and let the user decide what upgrades they care to pay for. For me, it was $350 for apple care, $300 for a SSD that I eventually took out, and $50 for the anti-glare screen. From there I did Ebay, and put a $900 SSD in, and spent another $400 to upgrade my RAM.

But I digress. There is tons to love about Mac, simply as a computer, and not even comparing to anything else. They are simply well thought out, and good systems.

The only thing I haven't liked so far is no double click to max/min a window in Safari. But I wrote a few Java bookmarks that got me around that one.

- Pixel -
 

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I have 3 computers ATM. A GatesWay laptop w/ XP Pro, a Sony Vaio laptop w/ Vista Home Premium and a GatesWay PC running FreeBSD (UNIX).

The first computer I used was an Apple w/ a real floppy disk you had to pop out, turn over and re-insert into the computer during the boot process. Before it was over I had to teach everyone where I worked how to use it and I had never touched one before that.
 

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I used to be more of a PC person growing up.

But I got my first laptop (it was a loan) which was a Mac in high school and I became a Mac person ever since. I was beginning to lean towards it even before that, because I'm into video editing, and Macs are made specially for that. My sister's ex gave me his old Mac Sunflower, and there was a lot of fun stuff to tinker with.


A family friend who I call Uncle has always been more of a Mac person, and he complains that PCs are so complicated. While my mom thinks Macs are so compacted. xD

My SO is a lot more techy than I am,but he's more of a PC person. He's stil been able to help me out in a lot of areas, but things get lost in translation between the two systems.
 

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Both Apple and Microsoft need to be forced into a proper capitalist market and be torn to shreds by competition like the worthless, inertia driven TBTF parasites they are.
 

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I don't have a strong preference. Home laptop is a Mac, work laptop is Windows, and my work is deployed on CentOS or RedHat Linux.
My phone is an android and my tablet is an iPad.
 

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I prefer Windows Desktop, but a MacBook as a laptop.

I actually encountered some Windows devices with touchscreens in regular desktop mode and they are kind of dumb. I haven't really used one with tablet mode on, but I'd presume they probably need tablet mode on to be any good.
 

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I long ago fulfilled the Apple Trilogy..............




<<<<<<---------------------take it frum a koon!

ipad, iphone, Mac Book Pro.
 

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Pc is the best for your money and you can actually upgrade , repair , ect . without the apple bullshit.
There is some products from apple which i find pretty cool like the ibook g3 and iphone 6s but really .... Apple is the supreme example of mindless consumerism .Hell.. you can buy a pc gamming machine for $800 or less which is insane and install whatever os you want and even you can make a hackintosh.
 

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Pc is the best for your money and you can actually upgrade , repair , ect . without the apple bullshit.
There is some products from apple which i find pretty cool like the ibook g3 and iphone 6s but really .... Apple is the supreme example of mindless consumerism .Hell.. you can buy a pc gamming machine for $800 or less which is insane and install whatever os you want and even you can make a hackintosh.
One thing with Apple is without the original mind behind it anymore, it does lose some of it's ingenuity at this point with the newer products that come out. I don't mean that it's completely lost, but it's where some of the cashgrabbing comes in.


Apple has some great video software, but the PC does have some formidable counterparts to it. There is also the fewer virus component of Apple. In my experience, Mac is good with costumer service. Macs also generally have a light and sturdy design.

But money/wallet is a big concern especially in this day and age, and when an Apple product is on it's last legs, or when problems come up, it's definitely not the best in that department.

I think there is indeed a bigger developing community with PCs.
 
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