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Cafe Legend and MOTM Jan 2011
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As some people here likely know, I have an aversion to the dreaded O-word and everything associated with it. Organization, and the expectation that I be organized, has always been something I have felt a strong urge to defend myself against. I feel that being organized stifles my creativity, closes me off from myself emotionally, and decreases my happiness. However, today I came across something that has the potential to change that. It would have to be slightly modified, of course, but ...

The life-changing magic of tidying up: Testing Marie Kondo's method - TODAY.com

It seems to be a method of deciding what to keep based on personal feelings about objects. I have seen similar methods based on how often one uses items, and have rejected those because I sometimes go years without using something only to become obsessed with it for a while, but as far as I can tell from this article, this is not one of those systems and would not have that limitation. It would not require parting with items that make me feel sentimental or that might bring me joy someday.

Rather than going all the way with it, by folding things in specific ways, rolling the socks, hanging things up, etc, I think it could work if I threw into floor piles things that make me happy in floor piles, and put on shelves things that make me happy on shelves. It wouldn't have to look tidy in order to be organized. If I could keep it cluttered-looking and eliminate inefficient uses of space by getting rid of items that do not increase my joy, I could have the best of both worlds and end up with enough room to work on meaningful projects without having to sacrifice anything I am unwilling to give up.

What do you think? Is this method of organizing INFP-friendly for a change, or is it just more of the same? Is this method something special, or am I finally starting to get over my lifelong fear organizing?
 

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I like creative spaces messy and work spaces tidy. I must work in a tidy kitchen. It has to be tidy. But my workshops have always been messy. I like make things like cabinets and carve scenery into them or carve animals (all out of wood). But it's hard for me to think creatively in tidy places. I don't think you have to give up creativity to live a somewhat organized life. Just separate creative spaces where you do your best thinking from work spaces.

I think this system might help. But ultimately, I wouldn't tidy up creative spaces too much.
 

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I'm so tempted to try it. If anyone does, let us know how it goes!
 

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I know ^

I want to try this because it seems like it makes organization more creative, and also sounds like good practice listening to your feelings and emotions...especially for the positive ones.

I am pretty excited about it myself. I want to try it too. I could certainly go through my clothes, as most of them are hand-me-downs or very old. But I have more than I need for a week's worth of wearing, which is a good bare minimum for work.

lol Unless I hate all my pants or something, and don't end up having any pants left.

Though I could tie shirts I like together for a skirt or sew a new pair of pants out of them... : p

I think that even if I did end up disliking all of my clothing might offer some insight to improve happiness. Getting up and putting on things you don't even want to wear doesn't sound that healthy.
 

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I have almost no organizational skill so my solution is just to not have a lot of stuff. I also set important things up so that they are "visual". If something is out of sight it is out of my mind.

Ex. an agenda book would never work for me, I have to have huge calenders on my wall - four months up at a time.

Another example. I lay out all of my dresses on a large chair and fold my other clothes (t-shirts, pants, sweaters) in an open suit case beside the chair. Drawers and cupboards are abysses as far as I'm concerned. If something goes into one, I forget the item even exists.
 

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I tried part of this today--I didn't follow all the rules. Like I didn't do all the clothing and I didn't put it in a pile first.

But I ended up getting rid of about 70% of the clothes I went through...which is a little unnerving, but I do think it says something about how much attention or pleasure I've been getting from my clothes.

One interesting thing happened, and that is when I was looking at some of the embroidery on a couple of shirts my co-worker gave me (halloween stuff like ghosts and pumpkins), it made me really want to embroider my other clothes. The owls were so cute though the rest of it was really not something I liked. So that was interesting, because it was sort of inspirational.

And then I also remembered how I wanted to paint the dresser. I pay such little attention to the physical environment most times, that I forget about stuff like that. But I do have a goal of improving my environment and so I think this will be a really useful technique for that. Thanks again for sharing.

(I may want to do the clothes over again with a big pile...I like to think that the differences will stand out if they are all together.
 

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As a neat-freak INFP, I will confess that I have been basically using this system for years. I could have written a book and made millions of dollars off it!

But really the main way to stay organized, is only have things you need, things you like, and things you actually use.
 
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