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Did you ever attend, apply, or drop out from an Ivy League?

Just curious. Personally, I was aware of my own shortcomings as a student but submitted an app to Stanford anyway. I'm still fortunate to have attended a very progressive, liberal research-oriented school (well known and recognized, but not considered as part of the Ivy). What are your own experiences like?
 

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I applied to Harvard and Dartmouth. Ended up going to a top LAC. I didn't get in anyway. (Well Stanford is not Ivy)
 

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I went to an Ivy. I have faced more reverse elitism than anything. People will just assume things like I am overprivileged and in no shortage of opportunities. So I don't tell anyone. In truth, I went through my merit only and they paid my way. So no nepotism for me.
 

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I interviewed with a couple Ivy schools but chose to go to a small, rural, private school instead.
It was partially a matter of personal preference toward smaller campuses, and partially a financial issue.
There are moments when I regret that decision, but the feeling usually passes quickly.
 

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I went to both a large state school public institution for undergrad, then a school similar to Stanford that plays in the Big 10,wears purple and that I paid too much for...I didn't consider the quality of education that much different, though the student body was very different. I generally do not mention it at all. I am not one to wear school stuff, have stuff like "alumni" on a car, or have a framed diploma, nor did I attend graduation ceremonies. Likewise, I find people who name drop schools incredibly pretentious. I probably should have applied to more schools out of high school but had relatively little guidance as neither of my parents went to college.
 

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Well, I know it's not "technically" an Ivy League school, but I was offered a fellowship to attend Johns Hopkins for graduate school for my Ph.D. Ultimately Ni beat out Te (shocker) and I went for research that truly appealed to me more... at a "Public Ivy League" university haha
 

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I'm applying to Princeton as we speak. I don't consider it academically superior to the other schools on my list; I'm mostly in it for the financial aid.
 

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*I would like to interject on behalf of "my" INTJ, if I may, because I feel it's relevant and potentially helpful information.

He got into Cal Tech, MIT, U Penn, and Dartmouth. Marvelous schools.
But far too expensive!

So he opted to go to school here (a secret, non-disclosed location) where he is practically making a salary's worth off of his numerous scholarships supplemented with work study and research opportunities.

Take note young INTJ's.... take note.
 

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Two science degrees from Johns Hopkins (not Ivy, but quality). Note to others: don't be dissuaded by sticker shock at tuition prices. The top 25 U.S. News schools (for whatever that's worth) have billions in endowment, and they will make the money work out if they really want you. I paid less at JHU than I would have at the University of Virginia as an in-state student. Both financially and academically, the top 25 schools are easier to navitage from within than from without.
 

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*I would like to interject on behalf of "my" INTJ, if I may, because I feel it's relevant and potentially helpful information.

He got into Cal Tech, MIT, U Penn, and Dartmouth. Marvelous schools.
But far too expensive!

So he opted to go to school here (a secret, non-disclosed location) where he is practically making a salary's worth off of his numerous scholarships supplemented with work study and research opportunities.

Take note young INTJ's.... take note.
This is good advice. While those schools may be great, it really depends on what your career interests are. If your interests are in a traditionally low paying career like say, journalism, public service, etc... I'm not sure going to the prestigious schools are worth it. Maybe for things like law and medicine with big long term pay offs.
 

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yes i go to an ivy.
never underestimate the power of name recognition. you may pay a ton for it but if you're pursuing a career n business it is 100% worth it. the networking opportunities are unparalleled and employers fawn over you.
 

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*I would like to interject on behalf of "my" INTJ, if I may, because I feel it's relevant and potentially helpful information.

He got into Cal Tech, MIT, U Penn, and Dartmouth. Marvelous schools.
But far too expensive!

So he opted to go to school here (a secret, non-disclosed location) where he is practically making a salary's worth off of his numerous scholarships supplemented with work study and research opportunities.

Take note young INTJ's.... take note.
Nam recognition maybe nothing for an INTJ but it's a big deal for 90% of people, 10 years forward, there is little chance you'll get the same career coming out of MIT than a state school. I'm saying it as someone who went to both and have had a look on career of alumnis.
 

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I was accepted at an Ivy League, but turned it down to go to a small liberal arts college that I thought was a better fit. No regrets.
 

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Fuck Ivy League universities--earning a "prestigious" degree in which the graduate can't even manage a conversation with the plumber fixing one's own sink. I respect my own elitist endeavors in education which includes honors and the discrepancies of "normalcy." The connections aren't worth it. I'd rather live in a world with intimate recognition of my greater and lesser. That I am a success and a failure. That I rule and serve. That I convince myself of knowing all and knowing nothing. This is life. And it is beautiful.
 

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Fuck Ivy League universities--earning a "prestigious" degree in which the graduate can't even manage a conversation with the plumber fixing one's own sink. I respect my own elitist endeavors in education which includes honors and the discrepancies of "normalcy." The connections aren't worth it. I'd rather live in a world with intimate recognition of my greater and lesser. That I am a success and a failure. That I rule and serve. That I convince myself of knowing all and knowing nothing. This is life. And it is beautiful.
It depend on the career you want to have, I see prestige as an asset for some careers. And as people we may change. A Ni dom INTJ may not care about going to MIT, but a 30s something INTJ with more ambitions and more developed Te may be happy to have the networking and prestige factor of an Ivy League University. You never know what life will be and what kind of person you will be in 10 years, and having the prestige factor means having more cards in hands.

My INTJ went to top Uni, worked in R&D, got frustrated and wanted to change career, he was able to do that thanks to alumni networking and then went to a top MBA. He is very happy with his job and the possibility to change and explore different careers.

Never underestimate the trust people place on rankings and how you can use it.
 

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It depend on the career you want to have, I see prestige as an asset for some careers. And as people we may change. A Ni dom INTJ may not care about going to MIT, but a 30s something INTJ with more ambitions and more developed Te may be happy to have the networking and prestige factor of an Ivy League University. You never know what life will be and what kind of person you will be in 10 years, and having the prestige factor means having more cards in hands.

My INTJ went to top Uni, worked in R&D, got frustrated and wanted to change career, he was able to do that thanks to alumni networking and then went to a top MBA. He is very happy with his job and the possibility to change and explore different careers.

Never underestimate the trust people place on rankings and how you can use it.
Perhaps I'd agree had I not found my ideal career through many transitions already. A lack of materialistic endeavor contributes heavily. I can live on less than $600 a month and be very happy. Prestige means nothing to me within the greater facet and relativity of the world. So you're a politician, lawyer, scientist, commander, professor--it means nothing to me. I carry no respect for a piece of paper, or the years you've spent earning it--and I speak as one who's earned many pieces of papers, but who cares not to graduate. Designations upon diplomas mean nothing. I value one upon what they present to me as their character. Teach me something that wasn't taught by some shithead with tenure and I shall respect you.

I will concede one point: If he is happy, good for him. He should be happy. Best wishes.
 
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I must say - from a Scandinavian perspective, it's a very odd world you Americans inhabit.
Yes, I'm not an INTJ and I'm hikjacking this thread, but I reeeeeally want to know why you think that!
I'm not saying I disagree. I'm just curious :)
 

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Yes, I'm not an INTJ and I'm hikjacking this thread, but I reeeeeally want to know why you think that!
I'm not saying I disagree. I'm just curious :)
The idea of picking a university based on what kind of fraternity networks you can build up and take advantage of feels so utterly alien - dare I say medieval... Not to mention the whole business of paying for your education. To me personally, even picking a degree/university with regards to career possibilities, success, status - basically anything but your personal tastes, desires and passion - feels bizarre.

I do realise that most of the world bears greater resemblance to the US than to Scandinavia.

Still. To paraphrase some ancient dude, blessed are they who need not think of material needs but can fully focus on what they feel passionate about. Maslow's hierarchy and all that.
 
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