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MBTI Ethical Guildlines of Use​


Myers And Briggs Foundation - Ethical Use Of The MBTI Instrument - Ethical Guidelines for the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

Myers briggs and company knew people would get all judgy when using MBTI, so they created some ethical guildlines to clarify how MBTI should be used. The source for the following is listed above. Here are the guidelines:

Identify type theory as the work of C.G. Jung and the instrument as the work of Isabel Briggs Myers and Katharine C. Briggs.

Present psychological type as describing healthy personality differences, not psychological disorders or fixed traits.

Be adamant that all types are valuable: no type is better, healthier, or more desirable in any way.

Describe preference and types in nonjudgmental terms at all times; be aware of how your own type biases may influence your words.

Present type preferences as tendencies, preferences, or inclinations, rather than absolutes.

Stress that type does not imply excellence, competence, or natural ability, only what is preferred.

Never imply that all people of a certain type behave in the same way; type should not encourage stereotyping or be used to put people in rigid categories.

Explain how people sometimes act in ways contrary to their preferences because of pressure from family, relationships, job environment, or culture. Consistent forced use of non preferences can cause stress.

When describing preferences, distinguish between what has been shown by research and what are anecdotes to illustrate type.

Provide appropriate interpretation of the MBTI® results for each and every administration of the MBTI instrument.

It is unethical and in many cases illegal to require job applicants to take the Indicator if the results will be used to screen out applicants. The administrator should not counsel a person to, or away from, a particular career, personal relationship or activity based solely upon type information.
 

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Thanks! That's an always needed reminder...

Three things especially caught my attention.

Stress that type does not imply excellence, competence, or natural ability, only what is preferred.
I think the underlined part here is interesting, that people can have a preference for one type without naturally being talented in that cognitive process.

When describing preferences, distinguish between what has been shown by research and what are anecdotes to illustrate type.
Not much to say about it really, but how hard isn't it to actually make that distinction in practice...

Provide appropriate interpretation of the MBTI® results for each and every administration of the MBTI instrument.
This is what gets me the most upset, when people take a test, and then think that that is their type. Online, or even worse IRL, tests that are not being followed up with a consultation is not a good way of typing people. And yet it happens so often.... :sad:

Again thanks! :happy:
 

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Great guidelines for Personality Cafe and for life!
 

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I think the underlined part here is interesting, that people can have a preference for one type without naturally being talented in that cognitive process.
A cognative process is not a talent. It is a way of seeing the world. Cognative processes are correllated with talent in certain areas, often strongly, because if you see the world in a certain way you are more likely to come up with certain insights that are huge aids in accomplishing certain tasks. But it wasn't the mindset itself that did it; it just provided a fertile environment. Like how certain trees are more likely to flourish in certain types of soil. And sometimes different types can accomplish the same task in strikingly different ways.

Also it means to stress that, say, just because you are may be an ISFP you will not necessarily be a talented visual artist. The professionals do not want someone to pick a careerbased solely on MBTI type. Similarly, sometimes others are a better judge of your personality than you io certain ways because they are more likely to have on objective view of you, but it would be unethical to let anyone but you determine your type, because it could allow others to put you in a box. It's more to prevent abuse than to say something about the functions and their ramifications.
 

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A cognative process is not a talent. It is a way of seeing the world. Cognative processes are correllated with talent in certain areas, often strongly, because if you see the world in a certain way you are more likely to come up with certain insights that are huge aids in accomplishing certain tasks. But it wasn't the mindset itself that did it; it just provided a fertile environment. Like how certain trees are more likely to flourish in certain types of soil. And sometimes different types can accomplish the same task in strikingly different ways.

Also it means to stress that, say, just because you are may be an ISFP you will not necessarily be a talented visual artist. The professionals do not want someone to pick a careerbased solely on MBTI type. Similarly, sometimes others are a better judge of your personality than you io certain ways because they are more likely to have on objective view of you, but it would be unethical to let anyone but you determine your type, because it could allow others to put you in a box. It's more to prevent abuse than to say something about the functions and their ramifications.
Thanks for putting in words what I was too lazy to do...
 

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Wouldn't it be simpler to just say:
"The MBTI in no way acurately reflects your personality, but is intended only to give you an idea of the types of differences you may or may not encounter when trying to understand yourself and others."
 

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there is no such thing as ethics
 
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