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ok here are some more generals that ive typed:

John Monash- Considered the greatest general of ww1 - INFP

John Lavarack - Defeated Erwin Rommel at Tobruk, i believe his is an ENTP

Thomas William Glasgow- At the Second Battle of Villers-Bretonneux, Glasgow's 13th Brigade, and Harold Elliott's 15th Brigade, recaptured the town of Villers-Bretonneux on 25 April 1918 after the Germans had overrun the 8th Brittish Division (This was the turning point of the war). I believe he was a ESFJ

Leslie Morsehead - Rivals John Monash as "Australia's Greatest General", was the Commander of forces in the battle of Tobruk and also fought with great distinction in WW1 - ENTP

Thomas Blamey - Great general from WW1, turned crap in WW2 especially during the Kokoda campaign - ISTP

Cyril Albert Clowes - Dealt the first land victory against the Japanese at Milne Bay -ENFJ
 
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I'd be interested in seeing what Claude Von Clausewitz is, I'd assume XNTJ from the way that he writes about strategy and the new methods of strategy that he employed, he was deffinately Te, he thought through each step in each strategy to make sure that it was as close to perfect as he could.
 

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I look at MacArthur as a successful INFJ
MacArthur was an arrogant and idiotic general who got his reputation by sending thousands of propaganda dispatches about himself so he could become a war hero so he wouldn't get fired

He is far from an INFJ in his dress, his methodology or his tactics, and whatever he was he wasn't healthy
 

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Cool thread. I've always like to read about military history and MBTI of course is of interest too, so this is right in my wheelhouse.

If you're looking for INTP's in this arena, look on the staffs of the leading generals rather than for the "famous" generals. I'm sure there were a lot of them there.

I would suspect, however, that Gen. George Marshall was an INTP and, notably, he was working in Washington DC. I also have my suspicions about Gen. Omar Bradley in that regard.

MacArthur was an arrogant and idiotic general who got his reputation by sending thousands of propaganda dispatches about himself so he could become a war hero so he wouldn't get fired

He is far from an INFJ in his dress, his methodology or his tactics, and whatever he was he wasn't healthy

Cool thread. I've always like to read about military history and MBTI of course is of interest too, so this is right in my wheelhouse.

MacArthur was a VERY flawed individual, especially given his narcissism and enormous ego. To say that he was "idiotic" is taking things way too far however.

His tactical and strategic talents were legendary. His most famous moment was of course the landings at Inchon, which was a brilliant and hugely successful plan. His handling of the New Guinea Campaign in WWII was similarly outstanding. I'm less familiar with his work in WWI, but I do know he came out of that with a sterling reputation.

It was not his intelligence but his ego and thirst for power and resentment of superiors "interfering" with him that got him in trouble.
 

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Cool thread. I've always like to read about military history and MBTI of course is of interest too, so this is right in my wheelhouse.

If you're looking for INTP's in this arena, look on the staffs of the leading generals rather than for the "famous" generals. I'm sure there were a lot of them there.

I would suspect, however, that Gen. George Marshall was an INTP and, notably, he was working in Washington DC. I also have my suspicions about Gen. Omar Bradley in that regard.




Cool thread. I've always like to read about military history and MBTI of course is of interest too, so this is right in my wheelhouse.

MacArthur was a VERY flawed individual, especially given his narcissism and enormous ego. To say that he was "idiotic" is taking things way too far however.

His tactical and strategic talents were legendary. His most famous moment was of course the landings at Inchon, which was a brilliant and hugely successful plan. His handling of the New Guinea Campaign in WWII was similarly outstanding. I'm less familiar with his work in WWI, but I do know he came out of that with a sterling reputation.

It was not his intelligence but his ego and thirst for power and resentment of superiors "interfering" with him that got him in trouble.
If he had "Handled" the situation at all previously there would've been no need for the New Guinea campaign. His deliberate ignorance early on is a big factor in why the pacif war went for so long.

His command of the New Guinea campaign would be his and Thomas Blameys' WORST failure as leaders. Thier complete and repeated ignorance of the situation, lack of respect for the leaders and soldiers and underestimation of the Japanese numbers made the New Guinea campaign one of the worst. It was fought by the lesser generals such as General Allen and Harding and when they failed to defeat such an "Inferior" enemy they were sacked.

The New Guinea campaign was a true and serious soldiers war, and shows the difference between say the 57th and the 39th on Kokoda, the leaders could be as great as ever but New Guinea was a hell within a hell.

As to his work in WW1 from what I've seen is that medals were either given out for the most average reasons (Nothing special about what he did), or America needed someone to be a media whore (Ironically he was was the worlds first press officer >_>). Perhaps he was riding on the coattails of his father to get recognised.

Not to mention the fact that he never took others' ideas into account, such as those at the landings at Ichon. While the landing was successful, his role as a general to account for those sorts of problems means that he failed his role.

He did have alot of good battles, but to ever put him in the best of the best would be beyond silliness, it would be a rude slap in the face for far better generals. Just because he was popular and a media whore, dosen't make his a good officer.
 

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If you're looking for INTP's in this arena, look on the staffs of the leading generals rather than for the "famous" generals. I'm sure there were a lot of them there.

I would suspect, however, that Gen. George Marshall was an INTP and, notably, he was working in Washington DC. I also have my suspicions about Gen. Omar Bradley in that regard.
I was JUST about to ask about that.

I suspect that not a lot of XNTPs make it to very high up in the military because we're not willing to kiss enough ass.

Also, just a general question (GEDDIT? GENERAL?) what about Pershing?
 

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I had always thought it was generally accepted that Rommel was an ISTP and Patton an ESTP - Keirsey & son type them this way, as well as others who have plenty more experience in typing than me.

Admittedly xSTPs are incredibly similar with a lot of crossover.
 

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MacArthur was an arrogant and idiotic general who got his reputation by sending thousands of propaganda dispatches about himself so he could become a war hero so he wouldn't get fired

He is far from an INFJ in his dress, his methodology or his tactics, and whatever he was he wasn't healthy
MacArthur Was ENTJ
 

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Erwin Rommel “The Desert Fox” ESTP

Rommel is often typed as an ENTJ. But I think he is an ESTP. To put some background information, Rommel was a tank commander in France in 1940. When Italy invaded British Egypt, they were thrown back in one of the most decisive defeats in the history of the war. Mussolini requested Hitler's aid: he sent the Afrika Korps and assigned Rommel to their command.

Rommel pushed the British back and fought a hard two year war in the desert. As the British began to dominate the Mediterranean, supplies and reinforcements became more scarce. As a commander, Rommel often led from the front with his troops. He was adored by them and although he was competent as a staff officer, his best days were at the front; that was where he won his medals and his reputation before he was sent to the Afrika Korps.

He chased the British across the desert without care for logistics; his biggest criticism was that he outran his supply lines. An ENTJ with his dominant extraverted Thinking would not allow his logistics to go unmanaged. This is why I type him as an ESTP. His disregard for future consequences led to his downfall; but when he brought the British to battle he was ferocious and almost undefeatable.

Rommel, however, did not follow convention. He put his best efforts into defying Hitler at D-Day; Rommel wanted his tanks to be mobile, but their command would instead come straight from Hitler, allowing the reaction time to be incredibly slow, possibly a fatal action. It was not only militarily where he was unconventional, too; he told his favourite commander, Von Luck, that Churchill was the only man who could save Europe from Communism; obviously not a view favourable amongst the German Army. He was incriminated in a plot to assassinate Hitler and he hated the Nazi system. The way in which he fought for his country but rejected its Government smacks of introverted Thinking. He paid for his ego functions: Hitler ordered him to commit suicide to save his family. In a last act of extraverted Feeling, Rommel swallowed a cyanide pill rather than bring his wife and son to national shame.

Thus I believe him to be an ESTP.

Heinz Guderian “Blitzkrieg” ENTP

Heinz Guderian has often been credited as the inventor of Blitzkrieg. This is not strictly true – in fact, the term 'Blitzkrieg' is a pretty meaningless statement – but it is a useful notion for us to start with. From the beginning, Guderian was a tanker. He played an important part in the Battle of France 1940 where German tanks cut through the French lines and forced a surrender within weeks, avoiding the vaunted Maginot Line.

I class Guderian as an ENTP because as a divisional and corps commander, he was master of exploitation. He collected all his tanks in one area and drove them through the enemy relentlessly. When he had accomplished a breakthrough, this was when he began to shine. A large formation of tanks behind the enemy line requires skilled leadership to put to good use. That is exactly what Guderian did.

With this mobile force behind the enemy's line, he exploited the position to the max. Imagine how a plant starts with one seed, grows into a stalk, and then flowers out in all directions. This is what Guderian did with his tanks; he looked for possibilities; weaknesses in enemy strength, areas of possible encirclement, strategic and tactical locations that could be taken – and exploited them. The sheer speed of this exploitation totally overwhelmed the French Army with its focus on static warfare. Classic extraverted Intuition.

Most Generals of the 30s looked at warfare through a set framework; mass infantry, firepower, and static warfare. Guderian just stepped over that framework and created his own; it turned out to be absolutely victorious. Unlike other Generals, though, he never kowtowed to Hitler. In Russia he was removed from command because he moved his tanks to exploit a Red Army counterattack, against orders of Hitler himself, when they were intended to drive on Moscow.

This once proud General was removed from active service in 1941, but returned in 1943 at the express desire of several in the German General Staff who knew his potential. He showed his ideas to Hitler; and Hitler even admitted that if he had listened to the advice Guderian gave as early as 1937, when he foresaw what would happen in a war with Russia in the book Achtung Panzer, he would never have invaded. Like Rommel, Guderian served his country, not Nazism: he later served as an advisor to the West German Army. Thus I type him as an ENTP.

Rommel and Guderian – a comparison

We have seen how Guderian looked always for possibilities to exploit a situation; while of course this is natural for everyone, especially Generals, this was Guderian's forte; he designed his entire strategy around creating these possibilities. Rommel was different; he only looked to the immediate and lacked foresight, although he was a student of Guderian's and served under him in France. Guderian was very careful to properly support his exploitations with regular infantry which filled the gaps; Rommel ignored his supply lines and paid for it. However, Guderian was always better placed in the General Staff. Rommel's place was at the frontline, directing the dispositions of troops and observing first hand how the the battle was progressing. They were two different men who were made for two different roles.

Hugh Dowding “Battle of Britain” INTJ

Hugh Dowding is one of the lesser known figures of WWII, yet his importance is far-reaching. Stabbed in the back by rivals in the Royal Air Force, his legacy is largely forgotten today, yet he can be accounted for practically winning one of Britain's greatest ever military victories: the Battle of Britain.

From 1936-1940 Dowding was the Commanding Officer of Fighter Command, in charge of the aerial defence of the British isles and of almost all the British fighter aircraft, including the famous Spitfire and Hurricanes. From the years 1936-40 Dowding spent a great deal of effort creating the world's first Integrated Air Defence System.

He authorised the creation of the world's first serious air defence network, comprised of radars, ground observers, and a complex but incredibly efficient mechanism of ground-air control. It was the first of its kind. He worked behind the scenes incessantly for four years to get the funding and authorisation for this program, against all the political odds – for the thought during the time was that the bomber would always get through, no matter the defence, and so Royal Air Force money should be invested in bombers.

It paid off. In June 1940, France surrendered to Germany, and Britain stood alone. The odds were not favourable. The luftwaffe heavily outnumbered the RAF and had extremely experienced pilots with incredibly high morale. Opposed to them were a few hundred Royal Air Force pilots, most of whom who had never seen combat. Even in the opening stages of the battle of Britain, pilots would often go into their first dogfight having never fired their guns before, even in training.

Immense pressure had been put on Dowding to commit fighters to defend France during the fighting there, but he was too stubborn. Dowding argued that they would be needed in the future; He held his ground and most of the RAF held behind in Britain.

The immense planning that Dowding had put in and his visionary ideas began to pay off. He wasn't a bold, lead from the front type of leader like Douglas Bader. He was old and was in no condition to fly. His position was behind the lines, putting into action totally radical and new ideas with articulate planning. I type him as an INTJ.

Isoroku Yamamoto “Pacific Tiger” ESTP

Admiral Yamamoto was the most infamous of all the Japanese Admirals. He was credited with inventing carrier warfare; a whole new branch of naval warfare, which is why many people would type him as some form of intuitor, but this is not true. Carrier warfare was in large part pioneered by Britain, where the concept came from. While the Japanese did build the worlds first purpose-built aircraft carrier, Yamamoto had no part in it. He saw the effectiveness of the British attack on Taranto and realised that this was the future.

He was not blinded by prejudice of other Admirals who thought that the battleship still reigned supreme. He also was not prejudiced to Japanese victory; famously stating that he would run wild for the first six months of the war, and then that Japan would lose; an unpopular view in a country full of fanatics, in a military that invented kamikaze and committed ritual suicide rather than surrender. It was not a matter of possibilities (Ne), but in fact an observation of what was already true, rather than denying the evidence. Yamamoto knew that Japan could never beat America, but when called to the challenge, he tried his very best to fight an unwinnable war. He was open to the facts around him; the ultimate extraverted Sensor.

While he did not pioneer the concept of carrier warfare, Yamamoto was one of the first Naval Staff Officers in the world to wake up to the realities of naval air power. He planned meticulously the Pearl Harbour attack, rewriting everything that had previously been known, looking at every little detail. Ultimately, this was his downfall. Yamamoto sought to engage the US Navy in a single decisive battle that would destroy their ability to fight: Midway. He meticulously looked, again, at every single detail, coming up with a complex battle plan: but ultimately, his subordinates were incompetent, and his plan did not leave enough room for the possibility of a different American battle plan. Like Rommel, this ESTP thought too much about the present and could not intuit alternative scenarios; these scenarios eventually caused his downfall. Yamamoto was killed in 1943.

Lewis (Chesty) Puller “Island Hopper” ESFP

Chesty Puller is the most decorated US Marine in history; he's also the only Feeler in my list. Chesty led from the front. Even as a Major General in Korea he was at the head of his division. He invented no new methods of warfare. While he had views that often clashed with command – on machineguns and airpower; he was no innovator. He did not invent these methods of warfare. His tactics were to drive into the face of the enemy and smash them with well drilled infantry attacks. Once, when surrounded in Korea, he uttered the famous words: "We’re surrounded. That simplifies our problem of getting to these people and killing them.”
He was a tough old nut that simply could not be cracked who loved the heat of battle and everything that came with it.

Chesty had a constant devotion to his troops; even enduring a smear campaign in the US for sending them crates of beer. The way in which he doted on his men and campaigned tirelessly for them is, I believe, introverted. He worked his way up from the bottom rank to the top; always considering himself one of the troops as a result. It was not a social relation of general to soldier as in other generals, but because he felt himself a part of something; 'The Marine Corps' – and had to align his behaviour in tune with something that gave him meaning in his life. For this I type him as an ESFP.

Notes

I have excluded Patton because he is very often cited as an ESTP. For the same reason I have not included Montgomery as he is often typified as an ESTJ; I want to use some less well known characters and also to get a perhaps wider variety of types. I also had to be able to use characters I was familiar with.

Sources: various internet
PANZER LEADER– The classic account of Blitzkrieg - The memoirs of Heinz Guderian
MARINE! The life of Chesty Puller by Burke Davis
FIGHTER by Len Deighton
PANZER COMMANDER – The memoirs of Hans von Luck
Rommel actually initially deeply admired Hitler and that only changed slowly over time with Adolf Hitler insisting in not authorizing retreats in North Africa when it became obvious the British plus Empire forces were becoming far too numerous to be dealt with.

Now, what really happened in relation to D-Day is that there were two schools of thought on how to deal with an Allied Invasion in France: Erwin Rommel thought once the allies had an established foothold in France all was over. So Rommel favoured the idea of preventing the allies from landing or attacking a beach-head immediately and as furiously as possible as to prevent it from taking hold -- which was also Hitler's point of view. Now, von Rundstedt, a well respected old school Generalfeldmarschall was of the old decisive battle doctrine: only a small defense of the beaches, in-dept defense keeping most armored divisions deep in-land ready for a counter-attack after the Allies established themselves to keep space for maneuverability and hopefully create enough casualties to make a possible negotiated peace.

While von Rundstedt plan had its logic, the constant bombing by the Allies, plus the sabotage of the French resistance, treason and severe lack of fuel made it impossible any quick reaction to an ally invasion after they set foot in France.

Hitler established a middle ground by dividing in half the number of tanks, giving half to Rommel where he would keep them along the coastline and the other part to von Rundstedt despite the fact that von Rundstedt was nominally the commander of the German Forces in France.
 

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Diphenhydramine said:
I class Guderian as an ENTP because as a divisional and corps commander, he was master of exploitation. He collected all his tanks in one area and drove them through the enemy relentlessly. When he had accomplished a breakthrough, this was when he began to shine. A large formation of tanks behind the enemy line requires skilled leadership to put to good use. That is exactly what Guderian did.

Like Rommel, Guderian served his country, not Nazism: he later served as an advisor to the West German Army. Thus I type him as an ENTP.
You mistype the extraverted sensor Guderian, and you should really update your knowledge about him and his fellow generals.


Heinz Guderian: The Character

When Heinz Guderian was a boy and a young man at the Kadetten-Anstalt, his teachers described him as 'always serious' or 'very serious'. Very soon, Guderian gained the ability of speaking very concise and clearly, and if he wished, cold and hurting. For this he was equally famous and feared. He made no friends until he got his first command. When his Funken-Station was overrun at the Marne, because of his incapable Division-Commander, he then wrote a devastating report, which would have costed him his career (Guderian was a Lieutenant at that time). But his Division-Commander fell in disgrace shortly later, because of an unnecessary retreat. Many times his hot temper brought him trouble and he was often saved by a superior who saw a young officer with exceptional military ability, but a bad control over his temper. Many times later Guderian disobeyed orders from his superiors. They often tried to hold his advance, fearing his exposed flanks and wanting to bring the marching infantry up, which could not cope with the advance of the tanks. This was a grave mistake and Guderian knew it. Armored warfare knows no flanks. The German Wehrmacht's officers were no bunch of good comrades. Everyone wanted his share of glory and the youngest made the most progress, so this was another reason to stop him. There are many pictures of Guderian, because some Propaganda officers followed the popular generals wherever they went and took a lot of shots. Every picture shows smiling Guderian on the front and surrounded by his soldiers. Guderian had a very affectionate smile, which states "follow-me-and-gain-glory". Although when pictured with his staff or superior officers Guderian seldom smiled. His soldiers and officers loved him, because he was always with them and they knew what he knew. Guderian could drive, aim and shoot every tank. His ability as a commander came not from recklessness and intuition, as with Erwin Rommel, but from deep knowledge. He knew exactly how far every tank could go and over which landscape, were he would be slowed down and were he could speed up. Heinz Guderian knew all that, because he was the creator and the German Panzerwaffe was his creation. This was never fully recognized by the German High Command. (S)


Russell Hart, Guderian: Panzer Pioneer Or Myth Maker? (2006)

Biographers and historians have lionized Heinz Guderian as the legendary father of the German armored force and brilliant practitioner of blitzkrieg maneuver warfare. As Russell A. Hart argues, Guderian created this legend with his own highly influential yet self-serving and distorted memoir, which remains one of the most widely read accounts of the Second World War. Unfortunately, too many of Guderian's biographers have accepted his view of his accomplishments at face value, without sufficient critical scrutiny, resulting in an undeserved hagiography. While undoubtedly a great military figure of appreciable ego and ambition and with a volatile, impetuous, and difficult personality, Guderian was determined to achieve his vision of a war-winning armored force irrespective of the consequences. He proved to be a man who was politically naive enough to fall under the sway of Hitler and National Socialism and yet arrogant enough to believe he could save Germany from inevitable defeat late in the war, despite Hitler's interference. At the same time, Guderian was unwilling either to participate in attempts to remove Hitler or to denounce as traitors the conspirators who did. In the end, he distorted the truth to establish his place in history. In the process, he denigrated the myriad important contributions of his fellow officers as he took personal credit for what were, in reality, collective accomplishments. Thus, he succeeded in creating a legend that has endured long after his death. This brief biography puts the record straight by placing Guderian's career and accomplishments into sharper and more accurate relief. It exposes the real Heinz Guderian, not the man of legend.


Klaus Wiegrefe: The Greed of the Generals (Translation: G. Oogle)

The elite of the Wehrmacht gave Hitler money and goods to make them docile. Special wishes were announced by Field Marshal Erich von Manstein.

When Hitler's adjutant Rudolf Schmundt went to the generals to hand over the Leader's rewards to them, he was anxious for discretion. The checks were in envelopes with "Geheime Reichssache" on them. Only a few confidants were allowed to know that Hitler sent his highest officers small fortunes, of course tax-free.

The generals of the Third Reich planned and led wars of aggression, they contributed to the genocide and bargained like Erich von Manstein with the SS for the clocks of the murdered Jews "for official purposes of the army". After the war, the men with the oak wreath on the peaked caps stated irrefutable reasons for their loyalty to the dictator, which cost millions of lives: the soldier's oath, the leader mania of the Germans, the impending invasion of the Red Army. Only Hitler could no longer remember Hitler's mild gifts.

They had it easy, because most of the written information was burned or lost in the war. Those who were not sentenced as war criminals were therefore allowed to keep property and money; Field Marshal Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb alone had to pay taxes for the contributions of the Fiihrer - a total of 880,000 Reichsmark.

Only now have Gerd R. Ueberschär of the Military History Research Office and the former Bundeswehr General Winfried Vogel systematically evaluated the remaining documents. They paint a strong image of greedy generals who fattened themselves and were rewarded by the leader.

From the Reich budget Hitler distributed up to 20 million Reichsmark a year among his minions. He provided old friends and deserved party members. He paid the debts of the German Ambassador in Moscow, Friedrich Werner Graf von der Schulenburg, and gave ministers such as Hans Heinrich Lammers, the head of the Reich Chancellery, hunting lodge, cash or precious paintings.

Occasionally he practiced astounding leniency against selected opponents, such as the former Reichstag President Paul Löbe (SPD), whose pension he increased. It does not go, "that one must starve, just because he was my opponent," he justified the strange generosity.

Hitler gave far less systematic than SS chief Heinrich Himmler, who led an exact file over his entire gifts. The sum he set according to his mood, the occasion - usually a birthday - he was indifferent. The money should reward devotees and convince doubters. The authors Vogel and Ueberschar call this method "targeted corruption from above".

That Hitler wanted to make his officers docile, he said in all sincerity. Blind obedience would be easier for a general, "if he has received appropriate honors from the state leader and must feel obliged to it," he told his adjutant Gerhard Engel after the French campaign in 1940.

He had just decided to send twelve generals to field marshals. Each of them got 4,000 Reichsmark a month extra and in addition service charges. Generaloberst received 2,000 Reichsmarks, more than a good ministerial salary. The last transfers took place in April 1945.

Hitler allowed the morning duties to be treated confidentially. Minister Lammers personally informed the recipients in the Berlin Chancellery, what they could expect "for the time being" from the Fiihrer's "resources." Anyone who was only in writing, had to send the message back to Berlin immediately.

Hitler liked to philosophize about the principle of bribing favorites with donations. He thought that was "a very smart thing". The more one honors a "heroic deed and achievement, the more one commits oneself to the person in question".

There was even one or the other officer who escaped this kind of obligation. When Hitler gave his adjutants a monthly "allowance" in the amount of a skilled worker's wage, Colonel Friedrich Hoßbach announced that it was against his conviction to accept money from the Fiihrer; Officers would have to maintain their independence. Captain Nicolaus von Below did not share the honor. He dares, despite the allowance "to preserve my independence"; he also had to spend "high sums" on his wardrobe.

One year after the beginning of the war, 1940, Hitler lured his officers that he would not be "petty" after the final victory in the distribution of land and latifundia. The victory did not happen, but the generals did not go empty-handed.

General Hans Hube received 50,000 marks (today's value: tenfold), the field marshals Gerd von Rundstedt, Erhard Milch, Wilhelm Keitel and Hans Günther von Kluge as well as Grand Admiral Erich Raeder 250,000 marks. (S)

Gerd R. Ueberschär,‎ Winfried Vogel, Dienen und Verdienen: Hitlers Geschenke an seine Eliten (1999)
 

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Rommel is an example of why a Field Marshal shouldn't be expected to take orders from a Corporal. By that, I mean Hitler. Rommel was so much like Robert E. Lee in that he fought for a regime he didn't believe in. Imagine the inner torment these men dealt with every day! And to this day, no one (other than true historians) talks about Lee's contributions to Reconciliation and Reconstruction.

Eisenhower is one of my faves and he's an INTJ.
 

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Rommel is an example of why a Field Marshal shouldn't be expected to take orders from a Corporal. By that, I mean Hitler. Rommel was so much like Robert E. Lee in that he fought for a regime he didn't believe in. Imagine the inner torment these men dealt with every day! And to this day, no one (other than true historians) talks about Lee's contributions to Reconciliation and Reconstruction.

Eisenhower is one of my faves and he's an INTJ.
Rommel was actually pro-Hitler until about mid-war.
 

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Rommel was actually pro-Hitler until about mid-war.
Hitler had a good sales pitch by the standards of that time and place, so it's no wonder. But Rommel still never sold his soul to the Nazi Party.
 

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Hitler had a good sales pitch by the standards of that time and place, so it's no wonder. But Rommel still never sold his soul to the Nazi Party.
That is actually a myth as well. After World War II NATO needed a strong Western Germany as an ally because if there was ever an actual confrontation between NATO and the Warsaw Pact, Western Germany would be the speed bump to hold the invasion for a few days (they were expected to resist for three days only, nonetheless and, to make things worse, after the fighting retreat, the plan was to use tactical nuclear bombs against the Warsaw pact, yes, nuclear bombing Germany multiple times!)

Rommel was an early admirer of Hitler, calling him the great unifier of the nation when he got into power, having a personal autographed copy of Mein Kampf that he himself asked for when he met Hitler, he signed even his personal non-working letters with "Heil Hitler!", voluntarily went to various ideological courses and he was elevated to the status of the "people's general", he was made to be one of the biggest heroes of the Reich -- voluntarily.

What made him revert his opinions was in the latter part of the North African campaign where Rommel made the crucial mistake of extending his supply lines too much and needed to retreat. While asking for the permission to retreat, I am not sure if Keitel or Jodl, two generals that worked as Hitler's assistants, didn't want to wake him up and assumed that Hitler wouldn't authorize a retreat so they responded in his name that no retreat was permitted, even though it was greatly needed. Hitler found out about it later (he usually woke up very late because he stood up until almost dawn) and kept the order initially for not retreating as to not look like that "he" changed his mind initially to not look like an indecisive person.

Hitler always had this fear of appearing ridiculous, to the point that there are barely any photographs of him wearing glasses although he did wear them; before you or anyone else say "his mustache was ridiculous", well, it was a popular type of mustache before he came to power, was chosen by him to be readily identifiable and without a mustache he looked abnormally young.

Rommel thought that entire ordeal was extremely stupid and that was a breaking point where he slowly started to grow antipathetic to Hitler, although it is very unlikely that he even knew about the plot to assassinate Hitler, let alone participate in it. Those involved with the plot wanted to use Rommel in the new government because he was respected by so many in the West.
 

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@Rventurelli The more I learn about Hitler, the more he seems like a cuck. I still say generals shouldn't be expected to take orders from corporals.
 
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