Personality Cafe banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,933 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You guys are my opposite type, so while I can change tires/lightbulbs, do BASIC car maintenance, fix computers/TVs and all the normal everyday stuff, I can't build a bicycle from raw materials, build a hydroponic 2-hydroxy airplane LED radiator (I don't even know what I'm saying, but you get the idea. Technical, complicated, fancy stuff.) I never even tried going beyond the normal stuff, I'd definitely screw up and break something fatally. I want to though, so you guys with natural ability are lucky.

Did anyone ever teach you the basics and you picked up from there?
Or did you just fiddle with things from a young age (without being stopped by your parents, like I did).
Or did you just automatically pick stuff up as an adult without ever watching anybody, reading instructions, taking classes or being taught?
Plus, where/how the hell did you guys even learn the NAMES and FUNCTION of all the items/terms/parts/tools? (600V-UD, 100BaseT, Assymetric Digital Subscriber Line, Capacitor, Axial Leaded, LED, etc)

And learn how to read stuff like this (the bottom part, and pretend it's not in German :crazy:):



(I saw your Projects thread, so envy drove me to ask this. heh)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
When I was a kid, I was compelled to take things apart to find out how they worked (and sometimes to try to improve them), and then put them back together before my mom found out. I don't think there was one appliance or component in our home that I didn't, at some point, take apart and reassemble. I started doing that at around age 4, when I found my first phillips head screwdriver in the kitchen drawer :)

I was raised by my mother (no dad in the picture at all), and she was the exact opposite of "handy", so I definitely was a self-taught girl. Only, I wasn't doing anything really major - just taking shit apart and putting it back together.

As I got older, I started taking on actual jobs - changing the brake pads, replacing the starter, doing plumbing repairs, etc. After I took Auto Mech in high school , I removed and rebuilt the carburetor on mom's 85 Corolla. When I got together with my now ex-husband (also an ISTP), we would do those things together - replacing the clutch in our car, rebuilding engines, building R/C cars together, etc. He handled electrical stuff, I handled more mechanical stuff.

But I'm not artistic in that way - I can't whittle or do carpentry. I can do (and love) demolition, but I can't design a new wall or room. Don't ask me for interior space design help. And I'm afraid I'd never be able to build something cool from scratch - I'm really more the "look at it, see how it's supposed to work, and fix it without a manual" kind of person.

I'm not probably as cool as some other ISTPs who are incredibly crafty and mechanically inclined. I'm just practical and I refuse to pay someone to do a job I can do myself. And I love working with my hands, especially hard work with heavy lifting and stuff. Makes me feel very powerful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
Oh hey, you added stuff to your original post...

I don't know... I'm very visual, so diagrams make best sense to me. I can't interpret written instructions very easily. I get bored and lost. But diagrams... that tells you in one concise picture everything you need to know. You know?

Plus, where/how the hell did you guys even learn the NAMES and FUNCTION of all the items/terms/parts/tools?
function is easy - what does it look like, and how might it fit the application? Everything has a use, so once you can hold it and see it, you can figure out what it does. The names of tools and parts and whatnot, I guess I just pick up along the way.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,261 Posts
When I was a kid, I was compelled to take things apart to find out how they worked (and sometimes to try to improve them), and then put them back together before my mom found out. I don't think there was one appliance or component in our home that I didn't, at some point, take apart and reassemble. I started doing that at around age 4, when I found my first phillips head screwdriver in the kitchen drawer :)

I was raised by my mother (no dad in the picture at all), and she was the exact opposite of "handy", so I definitely was a self-taught girl. Only, I wasn't doing anything really major - just taking shit apart and putting it back together.

As I got older, I started taking on actual jobs - changing the brake pads, replacing the starter, doing plumbing repairs, etc. After I took Auto Mech in high school , I removed and rebuilt the carburetor on mom's 85 Corolla. When I got together with my now ex-husband (also an ISTP), we would do those things together - replacing the clutch in our car, rebuilding engines, building R/C cars together, etc. He handled electrical stuff, I handled more mechanical stuff.

But I'm not artistic in that way - I can't whittle or do carpentry. I can do (and love) demolition, but I can't design a new wall or room. Don't ask me for interior space design help. And I'm afraid I'd never be able to build something cool from scratch - I'm really more the "look at it, see how it's supposed to work, and fix it without a manual" kind of person.

I'm not probably as cool as some other ISTPs who are incredibly crafty and mechanically inclined. I'm just practical and I refuse to pay someone to do a job I can do myself. And I love working with my hands, especially hard work with heavy lifting and stuff. Makes me feel very powerful.
I think your mechanical learning experiences are typical of quite a lot of people, especially ISTPs.

So both you and your husband are ISTP, how did that work out? Was it good, bad, or indifferent?
Care to elaborate on your relationship strengths and weaknesses? Would you ever again be in a relationship with another ISTP?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,933 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh hey, you added stuff to your original post...

I don't know... I'm very visual, so diagrams make best sense to me. I can't interpret written instructions very easily. I get bored and lost. But diagrams... that tells you in one concise picture everything you need to know. You know?
The top part does. But the bottom part where there's zigzags, swirls and geometric shapes...I don't know what that's supposed to represent. It reminds me of chemistry class. o_O Does it represent the physical shape, or is it representative of some continuum of even more intricate components and shapes? And what does the "U", "L" and "R" mean?

function is easy - what does it look like, and how might it fit the application? Everything has a use, so once you can hold it and see it, you can figure out what it does. The names of tools and parts and whatnot, I guess I just pick up along the way.
What if you found these somewhere, assuming you didn't already know what these are. I'd assume they're either ergonomically friendly tweezers or they've got something to do with electricity.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
So both you and your husband are ISTP, how did that work out? Was it good, bad, or indifferent?
Care to elaborate on your relationship strengths and weaknesses? Would you ever again be in a relationship with another ISTP?
he's my ex for a reason :tongue:

It was fine. Dull. But easy. We never argued about anything. We weren't EXACTLY alike - he was more organized and better at planning, I was more spontaneous and haphazard. He was colder and more calculating. But that could just be the male/female thing anyway.

We are still very good friends. In fact, he's the first person I talk to about most anything. He just "gets" me. But it was never passionate. There was no mystery for either of us. We didn't balance each other out in any way - we were both cold, deep thinkers with heavy mechanical and fixit skills, sharp and clever senses of humor and very similar taste in everything (ie: our home was practical and functional, but never "pretty"). Without some level of tension, there just wasn't any passion at all. I've found I'm most passionate toward people who are baffling in some way.

I would be attracted to another ISTP, no doubt. I find them alluring for their minds and their logical, practical, take no prisoners way of being. But I probably would avoid a relationship with another one, only because it may be a waste of time. After all those years with him - which were FINE, but not AMAZING (if you know what I mean), I just don't know that I want to pursue something so... predictable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
The top part does. But the bottom part where there's zigzags, swirls and geometric shapes...I don't know what that's supposed to represent. It reminds me of chemistry class. o_O Does it represent the physical shape, or is it representative of some continuum of even more intricate components and shapes? And what does the "U", "L" and "R" mean?
They're symbols used in drafting. Considering it's a German diagram, I'm hesitant to guess what the letters stand for.

Were it in English I'd be golden :happy:



What if you found these somewhere, assuming you didn't already know what these are. I'd assume they're either ergonomically friendly tweezers or they've got something to do with electricity.
they're led bulbs.

I knew they were bulbs/lights to begin with just by looking at them, and I'm deducing that they're LED. Just because that's what an LED bulb SHOULD look like. So, there ya go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,933 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
They're symbols used in drafting. Considering it's a German diagram, I'm hesitant to guess what the letters stand for.

Were it in English I'd be golden :happy:

they're led bulbs.
Jesus Christ. Where do you learn all this stuff? :crazy: It can't all be from that one course you took.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
That bottom diagram is of a circuit. The L next to the curly shape is an inductor, and the R next to the zig-zags is a resistor.

Granted, I didn't find this out until I took a high school electronics class 6 years ago. Probably helps that I just recently graduated as an electrical & computer engineer too. :D


My dad had taught me very basic things to play games on the computer when I was very young. I was just really fascinated by them and I would basically "take it apart and put it back together", both the software, and eventually the hardware when I got older.

In third grade (1995), I would actually type up and print out assignments. Some teachers were impressed, but the majority wanted me to redo it in hand (I suppose I was too ahead of my time). Eventually we got to typing classes, and more advanced stuff, but I already knew how to do it. It took until high school before I got to a class I didn't know anything about (programming).

The majority of the things that I learned about computers were self-taught. When I got to things I didn't understand, I'd look up on the internet (yes, even in the days of 56K). I learned all of the acronyms and what ever else I needed to know to do what I wanted to do. By seventh grade I had put together my own computer, using only knowledge I looked up myself online. My parents were pretty surprised.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,261 Posts
They're symbols used in drafting. Considering it's a German diagram, I'm hesitant to guess what the letters stand for.
No, they are schematic and electronic engineering symbols. The "R" above the zig zag line is a resistor, the "L" above the looping circles is Inductance. It's an electrical motor, but linear not rotary. It's really quite simple, but the quality of the drawing is poor, I'm having trouble seeing it. Not so complicated that I feel compelled to try and figure it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
No, they are schematic and electronic engineering symbols. The "R" above the zig zag line is a resistor, the "L" above the looping circles is Inductance. It's really quite simple, but the quality of the drawing is poor, I'm having trouble seeing it. Not so complicated that I feel compelled to try and figure it out.
I know. I kicked myself after I posted that. My ex husband is a controls/electrical engineer, and I should pay better attention to my verbiage. I've seen this shit a thousand times, and still couldn't find the right words when I posted. I'm all emotionally fragile right now, I get a pass :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,933 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I know. I kicked myself after I posted that. My ex husband is a controls/electrical engineer, and I should pay better attention to my verbiage. I've seen this shit a thousand times, and still couldn't find the right words when I posted. I'm all emotionally fragile right now, I get a pass :wink:
You can always edit your posts.... shhh... :wink: ...no one will ever know.

Till NOW that is! :crazy:

*dashes to Google "resistor", "linear vs. rotary circuits", "inductance"*
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,365 Posts
I used to take things apart and rebuild em when i was a kid but then changed around to chemistry based "designs" to see what i can cook up but since my creativity is near 0, it ended up being just following something off the web. Later on, i picked up carpentry and almost every piece of furniture in the sauna / main house in our summer home was built by me or my dad (istp). Never got any training from anyone in that regard, i just knew how to do it because it looked like it fits.
The designs you posted in the first post, i could understand before high school. Dabbled with electronics in high-school but im still not good enough to be able to repair circuits like my dad can. He used to work as a electrical / mechanical engineer before and he can fix almost anything.

The tool names you remember over time without having to learn em. Once you use something for a few times, you end up remembering what its called.

I am totally clueless about cars tho i believe that if i spent a few hours looking at it, i could probably figure out whats wrong. Also, i never got any training or passed any classes/courses relevant to electronics, carpentry or computers, i picked it up over time from experience or reading about it in the wiki.

nice name kernel panic, reminds me of when i started dabbling with unstable kernels and trying to fix the code myself. welcome ^^
 
  • Like
Reactions: dagnytaggart

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
I learned like everyone else...just by doing it. I do read manuals though because I don't want to have a finished product that isn't properly built. I'm usually in charge of putting things together around the house. I remember I put together this enormous bookcase when I was 8 months pregnant with my daughter. I have such an attachment to that thing because it was such an accomplishment to me! Also, I have such an insatiable curiosity when it comes to how things work that I can't stop until I have figured it out. I don't necessarily have to master it, I just want to know how to do it. I know how to do everything from making coconut oil to changing a hot water heater. Also, whatever I'm learning has to be practical and useful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
I think ISTPs are just naturally happier when we have a problem/puzzle to solve, so that's what draws us to projects, tools, etc.

I also find, and this may just be me, but when I'm working on solving a puzzle or problem my mind just focuses on THAT instead of being everywhere all at once. It's a surefire way to quiet my brain for a while. I volunteered to rip up a friend's linoleum floor a couple weeks ago for that reason alone - it was a lot of work, messy and sucky, but my brain was QUIET, which meant it was like taking a free vacation (with free beer!) for five hours.

I buy a logic puzzle book every few weeks for this purpose as well - when I absolutely have to get some peace, I sit down with logic puzzles and focus.

I don't get that same peace when working out, editing photos, playing with my kid, watching TV... the only thing that quiets my mind is puzzle-solving, whether it's a logic or word puzzle, or some sort of project or repair.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,265 Posts
Experience. We're not super smart from the get go, we're just super curious. So our knowledge on the subject skyrockets if we're interested enough. Its all based on experience, trial and error. We understand the physics of objects because we always have to touch every object we find new or interesting in sight. We know those diagrams because we probably googled "how the hell do I read this thing."

We're fuelled by our curiosity, and our knowledge of every piece of our environment helps contribute to our ability to piece things together to make new projects. As an ENFJ, you simply might not be as curious as we are. Its a culmination of a lifetime of fiddling with whatever objects we see. Every object we touch, we can store its physical sensations in our minds (I don't know if this is purely an SP thing or if everyone else can do that too).

I suppose you can do this stuff too if you backed up your desire to build stuff with some kind of big picture ideal like "world peace" or something. I'm not really sure what motivates ENFJ's so that was a gross presumption.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,933 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Experience. We're not super smart from the get go, we're just super curious. So our knowledge on the subject skyrockets if we're interested enough. Its all based on experience, trial and error. We understand the physics of objects because we always have to touch every object we find new or interesting in sight. We know those diagrams because we probably googled "how the hell do I read this thing."

We're fuelled by our curiosity, and our knowledge of every piece of our environment helps contribute to our ability to piece things together to make new projects. As an ENFJ, you simply might not be as curious as we are. Its a culmination of a lifetime of fiddling with whatever objects we see. Every object we touch, we can store its physical sensations in our minds (I don't know if this is purely an SP thing or if everyone else can do that too).

I suppose you can do this stuff too if you backed up your desire to build stuff with some kind of big picture ideal like "world peace" or something. I'm not really sure what motivates ENFJ's so that was a gross presumption.
World peace? Not my responsibility. :crazy:

I just never *ever* messed around with things because of the paranoia that I'd fatally break the item and therefore waste tons of money. Plus, nobody taught me how to even do the "everyday" stuff, so I was scared shitless when teaching myself how to change a tire, etc.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,265 Posts
Heh. Yeah people always tell me to be careful around machinery and stuff, but I'm starting to think they just don't know what they're doing.

um, practice makes perfect I guess, I'm not sure what to tell you. I'm also afraid of breaking a car when trying to fix it, but once you take it apart and put it back together, you realize just how easy it is to make it work again when it breaks. It just takes some experience to learn just how durable a car is, or anything else.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top