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Anyone else get motion sickness? I don't experience it when I'm driving. Open windows makes a world of difference for the better. As a passenger, I don't eat, read or look at pictures/words/maps while the vehicle is in motion for more than a minute. It helps if I watch the road in front of me. The best thing I can do when travelling backwards is to close my eyes. It's weird, I handle roller coasters just fine, as long as the wind is in my face and my body feels the motion.

If you get motion sickness, how well do you deal with 3D tv and movies? I've had my eyes checked out a few times and they're better than 20/20, but I can't watch 3D without wanting to vomit and getting a headache. But I've read 3D is only supposed to be a problem if you have eye problems.

This probably has nothing to do with type, but I'm curious.
 

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I'm the same way. I can't read or play games in cars, and I always have to have access to see what's outside. My sickness is especially bad when it's dark out or if it's simply a horrible driver behind the wheel. There have also been times when I can usually handle a car ride through the mountains, but every now and then (and this only happens when we're traveling in mountainous areas) I get incredibly sick and have to stop for at least 30 minutes to vomit until there's nothing left.
M
I love roller coasters though. I've never been on an amusement ride that has made me sick, the closest one being MaXair at Cedar Point. It spins and moves back and forth. Here's a picture:

 

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Yeah, I don't understand a regular car ride, passenger side with the windows closed can produce more nausea than rides like that ^
 

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When you are driving you are in control and you can ''prepare'' your body to handle a certain angle.

When you are not driving, you are basically constantly calibrating your balance which results in feeling unwel. because you cannot perfectly anticipate what the next move will be of the driver. Staring in front of you is the best solution to this problem as you can subconsciously anticipate movements(to a limited degree, it will still make you sick).

Interestingly enough, you'll feel fine whenever you are taking the backseat on a pick-up or motorcycle due to the wind gently combing your hair. The conclusion to this problem is obvious:

You are a wind-borne.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
When you are driving you are in control and you can ''prepare'' your body to handle a certain angle.

When you are not driving, you are basically constantly calibrating your balance which results in feeling unwel. because you cannot perfectly anticipate what the next move will be of the driver. Staring in front of you is the best solution to this problem as you can subconsciously anticipate movements(to a limited degree, it will still make you sick).

Interestingly enough, you'll feel fine whenever you are taking the backseat on a pick-up or motorcycle due to the wind gently combing your hair. The conclusion to this problem is obvious:

You are a wind-borne.
I'm not sure what wind-borne means. But yeah, I did ride dirt bikes in my teens. I didn't have a problem with them. I've ridden on handlebars of a bicycle while someone else rode. I don't recall any nausea. It's just really difficult when the information reaching my eye doesn't feel right. Like, they don't match. Like I ate something that wasn't right.
 
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Not ESTP but I totally identify with this...I will often get sick as a passenger, no matter how good the driver is, especially if I look around. So eating, reading and anything else that doesn't involve looking ahead is completely out of the question...as is sitting in the back seat for more than 10 mins. However I never get sick from my own driving, though it is often quite...exciting, I suppose :) But I always drive with the windows down, so maybe that has something to do with it...nothing makes me sick in a car like stuffy air or, even worse, car fragrances :confused: I watched a 3D movie just once in my life and it was horrible...I kept taking the specs on and off but both options made my head hurt and my belly protest...

However, I have no problems with flying and love roller-coasters :)
 
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I'm the same way except with aircraft. As a pilot, I can put the plane in all sorts of weird angles and maneuvers without ever getting sick, but I got seriously ill on trans-Atlantic flights like clockwork. Once it got so bad I had to bee-line it to the restroom and relieved myself of that flight's dinner after landing at the airport. I concur with the notion that being in control helps alleviate the sickness.

Motion sickness itself is caused by the eyes, inner ear, and the body itself. When 1 or 2 sources tells you that you're moving and the third isn't buying it, you're gonna get sick. For the movie, your eyes and ears tell you that you're moving, but your body being in a seat knows very well that you're not, hence the mental disconnect resulting in the sickness. I've seen a few cures for motion sickness, ginger ale was recommended for a 3D film I once saw. Consumed 1 can of organic ginger ale during the 3D film (war film so lots of camera movement) and didn't feel any worse for wear. There was no control group so I can't really speak to the method's validity, but I did have success after eating protein. The one and only time I did not get sick at all on the trans-Atlantic flight was when I had a salmon burger on whole grain bread (pretty good protein and complete protein there) and followed that by plenty of water during the flight. Nothing happened. The return flight required Aviomarin (European OTC motion sickness pills) and Tylenol together which lulled me to sleep.

Hope some of this helps.
 

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Um, strangely this doesn't occur to me unless it's medication induced or I just ate. I've been on bumpy rides and even at sea where it's famed to occur. Pop half a dramamine and ya, it's gone. A benadryl will do too (only half cause that shit makes ya dopey as fawk).
 

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I haven't gotten motion sickness in the car since I was a little kid. I can eat a shitload of food and down a bottle a soda but it won't effect me on cars or boats and I'm able to read or play on my phone in the car just fine. My brother gets it really badly though so he has to look out the window at the road ahead to neutralize it.
I also don't get nauseous on roller coasters either, now that I think about it. There's a six flags park in my town and I can ride any roller coaster 5 times in a row without wanting to puke. I haven't puked in almost 10 years, actually, not counting the time I got really bad food poisoning.

For the few times I do get nauseous, I usually restrict my diet to toast only until the feeling passes and I drink ginger ale. Pills never really seemed to work for me.
 
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I'm exactly the same in the car @monemi.

I'm fine when I'm driving but as a passenger, if the car is relatively a new car and has that 'smooth' feel, christ I get the worst headaches. The best way to solve it is always having a window open where the fresh air can hit my forehead.
 

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Fine when I'm driving, and fine on the subway or a train, but on the bus ... I almost always get sick.

There are also times in the summer when the smell of leather in a car is just too much for me
 

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I get sick a lot in our car when I'm not driving. I get a major headache and feel like throwing up. Like everyone else, roller coasters are fine. Also, when driving at night I cannot stand it. I get a major headache because of the headlights coming at me.
 
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