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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes, you read correctly. (Ne) took over when I read the article 'why I gave up a $95,000 to move to an island and scoop ice cream'. You'll have to Google that article as I'm unable to post links.

29. Single. Male. Midwest my entire life. Pretty close to family. I decided to take a career break this year starting in June. Traveled. Visited friends. Reflected. Returned August.

Since then, been really focused on getting (Fi) "right" and learning to listen to inner self and inner clarity. Lot's of yoga. I have perfectionist and procrastination tendencies, so I've tried to mindfully work on those as I plot a path forward. Progress, not perfection. It's just really tough to find inspiration for a new career. Part of me feels I should stay here and just try another industry, company, etc. Anything. But mostly I'm feeling that would eventually lead me to become disengaged in another numbing career routine.

So, I'm moving in February to St. John (small island in Caribbean). I'm hoping to find work in hospitality (economy is pretty much all tourism). My hope is to stay at least two years and try to cultivate joy in an island life and really give it a fair shake. I've never left the continental U.S., but I'm optimistic about this experience and what may come from it.

Has anyone else ever done this? St. John is an incredibly small island so my main concern is island fever. How were you able to cope with your new life? Missing loved ones? Battling nostalgic thoughts? Basically, how were you able to find gratitude in your new world, knowing what you left behind? What were your positive and negative results?

Thanks!
 

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Almost thought you said St. John's.

If that were the case, I'd tell you to come hang out.
 

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I have never moved out of the country, but in 1990 my wife and I moved from Florida to Wisconsin without any family living in the new place, not knowing anybody there, and not even having any job nailed down.

My wife had immediate family living in Florida, but they were a few hours from where we lived. We could decide on a day to visit them, but the proximity wasn't such that we interacted daily, weekly, or even monthly. My immediate family lived closer to Wisconsin but 5 hours away. Eventually my mom moved to Florida, so all close family other than my wife and daughters are quite some distance away. I do have some aunts, uncles, and cousins that live a state or two away, but we don't interact much at all (less than once/year).

It seems that being away from family will affect different people differently. If your family has generally been a safe and supportive place for you, then it may be harder than if you have severe clashes with your family (and love doesn't abound). I moved with my wife. That's not the same thing as going it alone.

I see from your profile that you are Gen Y and perhaps are more wont to use the various social media and technologies abounding these days, such as Skype. That might help you feel a sense of connection to your family should that be an important need for you.

When it came to leaving (started to type fleeing) Florida there were no nostalgic feelings for me to battle. I had lived there for four years. That was more than enough time for me to realize that I needed to head north. Also during the 90's Florida was the de facto doorway for crack cocaine to enter the US and all of the fallout with it. Calling upon a mixture of memories of vacations to various locations in the US we had as children coupled with a couple of books providing MSA data, we separately came up with a list of places that we thought might be more fitting for us. We whittled the list down to two places and planned vacation time to visit both locations. After arriving at the first and liking it greatly, we ended up spending our entire vacation there, ended up moving there a few months later, and are still living in that area.

So for us it wasn't about needing to see something new and different. It was more about finding the right place (Fi driven vs. Ne driven). I guess that implies that although I have had a similar experience and to a limited extent, my motivation seems to be a bit different.
 
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I never move anywhere and change my job but I think it sounds pretty good. It needs some courage to do that because it lets the comfortable zone go. I would love it if I could. Sometimes I wonder how if I didn't choose this path (but I don't regret it because this is my choice). I hope you will have a really great life there.
 
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I've done it twice but always to very big cities. That helped, because I felt I could be alone while still feeding off the energy of the current of humanity all around me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for sharing. Great observations. Its so important to understand our motivation behind things. What drives us to wonder? To wander? To feel so strongly a certain way? Mine is definitely Ne driven. Part of me feels I just need to get this out of my system. I have always had this internal conversation about up and moving somewhere randomly. Used to be Seattle or somewhere in the Pac NW. Then San Diego after I visited this summer. Las Vegas. The internal dialogue piques most frequently in winter when the weather in Des Moines, IA sucks.

My biggest concern about this is that I won't be able to establish deep connections. 4,000 residents on a small island all supported by tourism. Seems like a very casual environment. As much as I like my alone time, we all need connections. At our core, its really what we desire. I'm not the best at putting myself out there relationships-wise, so I'm hoping this may force me to become more vulnerable to really cultivate depth in my relationships.

I use very little social media. I've mindfully tried to lessen its impact on my life over the last year, even deactivating facebook. It's so often a platform for PRETENDING our lives are fantastic. Sometimes the story we're telling the world isn't half as endearing as the one being told inside us. I'm sure I'll find ways to stay in touch with the people who matter most in my life. But I definitely will be focused on what I DO have on the island as opposed to what I've left behind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've done it twice but always to very big cities. That helped, because I felt I could be alone while still feeding off the energy of the current of humanity all around me.
I've tossed that idea around in the past, and I definitely lean on living in a larger city for my social needs. I'm to the point where I need more depth socially than simply living near 6 million people in 'public isolation'. Moving to an island community in a totally new climate, totally new culture, totally new economic world, etc. would definitely shake up my world. I'm hopeful and optimistic I'll find that depth I'm seeking in St. John, even if its nothing more than a new depth within myself.
 
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