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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I found this interesting video today:



How would an INTP villain act?

I feel like an INTP villain would have a tremendous amount of contingency plans and going on a conquest for the sake of it. Why go for power? Because he wants it. An INTP villain would have glaring weaknesses because of paranoia (analyzing EVERYTHING) and inferior Fe causing him to have moments of emotional outburst.

How would an INTP hero act?
 

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I agree 100% with what he said there. I've actually been thinking of going back and restarting my three books entirely now that I've discovered MBTI. It would add so much more depth to my characters, but it would also be a whole hell of a lot of work. :frustrating:
 

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I had thought about making an anthology featuring each of the different personality types before and the simple overview he gave really helped me understand the opposite personality traits better. Thanks for the video, it was so cool! ^^
 

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INTP villain: agree with OP.
Also: maybe he wants to do an experiment and decides he needs a whole world as his experimental system. We're pretty close to being a "closed system" so perhaps it's the best approximation to a "closed system" for ...?

INTP hero:
Obviously not for personal glory... maybe an INTP hero is born because ... (1) he is the villain's old teacher, and he realizes he made a mistake in his teachings so he wants to "correct" the teachings and remedy the situation, (2) he holds the key knowledge necessary for fixing some machinery or code, (3) after much reflection, he realizes that "hero antics" are the only economically feasible way to clean up the city, and he cannot recruit anyone else to take up the hero mantle.

No matter what, I think that the INTP hero would make for a very short story, or perhaps a very poor story (low in action).
The INTP hero would want to be liked (Fe) (so he can't easily be an anti-hero).
The INTP hero would be kind of useless at combat & at physicality.
The INTP hero would want to sit home and read or code.
The INTP hero would consider stuff like civil liberties, but wouldn't get really upset about violations of said liberties.

I can easily imagine an INTP sidekick to a hero, who is forced into taking on the role of hero for a short while to rescue the hero.
 

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Sylar from the TV Show Heroes was a pretty good character study of an INTP villain. He was unfulfilled with being a watch maker for most of his life. He's always thought he was special and contained untapped power and potential. It wasn't until he identified that he is able to gain other people's powers that he finally become motivated to become something. He quickly learned that he was able use and control power at a higher level than everyone else. Then he deemed that it was inefficient for people to have weak power, and it would be better if he killed them all and took their power for better use. Then his bloodlust began and he goes on a destructive rampage. I'm not sure if the writers of that show know about the MTBI, but propagandists of the show fit MTBI archetypes. Sylar's counterpart on that show is Peter who is very INFJ. They become nemesis, and their battles become a metaphor for chaos vs emphathy. Interesting enough Peter later on helps Sylar develop his Fe to get people to like him better so they are more willing to give him power instead of him killing them. And Sylar helps Peter control his power better because we know how INFJ are emotional unstable (lol) and Peter would sometimes go out of control.

I can't really think of an INTP hero. Maybe superman is (but I think its more likely that toby mcguire is intp), he is probably the closest.
 

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Thanks for this video. To answer your question, I think an INTP hero would be a reluctant one. INTP's need something drastic and powerful to drive them to great lengths. Their simple fascination with sciences would make them behind the scenes heroic with some type of solution. But, to get an INTP to be personally invested, you have to wreck his Fe and make him feel like it's his duty to personally see that someone is warned, saved, or destroyed.

An, INTP hero, is a hero on the edge, yet calm and collected. He handles situations, violent or not, with method. I think he'd be fairly humorous as well. Think Robert Downey jr as Sherlock Holmes. I think no mater how serious the situation an INTP hero will find something to joke about, in a black humored type of way.(half hearted reluctant jokes may be a copping mechanism) Of course in any story with an INTP hero under stress, there must be a point were he goes over the edge, ether cerebrally, or emotionally. From there on, it would be a story of redemption. A theme prevalent in my life as an INTP.
 

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INTP villain: agree with OP.
Also: maybe he wants to do an experiment and decides he needs a whole world as his experimental system. We're pretty close to being a "closed system" so perhaps it's the best approximation to a "closed system" for ...?

INTP hero:
Obviously not for personal glory... maybe an INTP hero is born because ... (1) he is the villain's old teacher, and he realizes he made a mistake in his teachings so he wants to "correct" the teachings and remedy the situation, (2) he holds the key knowledge necessary for fixing some machinery or code, (3) after much reflection, he realizes that "hero antics" are the only economically feasible way to clean up the city, and he cannot recruit anyone else to take up the hero mantle.

No matter what, I think that the INTP hero would make for a very short story, or perhaps a very poor story (low in action).
The INTP hero would want to be liked (Fe) (so he can't easily be an anti-hero).
The INTP hero would be kind of useless at combat & at physicality.
The INTP hero would want to sit home and read or code.
The INTP hero would consider stuff like civil liberties, but wouldn't get really upset about violations of said liberties.

I can easily imagine an INTP sidekick to a hero, who is forced into taking on the role of hero for a short while to rescue the hero.
Well, what makes a good hero is will power really. (Think spiderman and Batman) It's the very fact that an INTP wouldn't be the upfront hero, that would make him an interesting one. The fact that he wants to be liked, but maybe has to be hated creates drama. Him having to figure out ways of overcoming formidable opponents would create suspense. The context of the situation would have to be drastic to motivate him. I think an INTP hero makes for a grueling and exciting story.
 

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Isabel Briggs Myers wrote a murder mystery novel called "A Murder Yet to Come." The characters in her story are definitely influenced from the MBTI system she helped to develop. In my own writing, the characters form their own personalities rather than being a type. I don't consciously try to mold them into one of the sixteen archetypes. Only afterward do they resemble some of the archetypes more than others, and in order to be fleshed out, they might not strictly fit into any one box. They all have their own experiences and values, idiosyncrasies and behaviors. Even if they fall under the label of ENFP or INTP, they are variations of that type, individuals, but still having some of the universal traits that makes us humans.

I suppose from learning more about personality type theories, being influenced by the people I've encountered, and from trying to write emotionally honest from my own perspective, they form into themselves, mostly from the different parts of my unconscious mind. I don't necessarily say to them that they must be strictly one type of person. They are morally ambiguous grey characters, some more fleshed out than others, and some a mere plot device. As Kurt Vonnegut said, his characters are being stretched on old rubber bands. He has some control over what they do but as they begin to develop, their personalities follow their own paths, almost outside your conscious awareness.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
INTP villain: agree with OP.
Also: maybe he wants to do an experiment and decides he needs a whole world as his experimental system. We're pretty close to being a "closed system" so perhaps it's the best approximation to a "closed system" for ...?

INTP hero:
Obviously not for personal glory... maybe an INTP hero is born because ... (1) he is the villain's old teacher, and he realizes he made a mistake in his teachings so he wants to "correct" the teachings and remedy the situation, (2) he holds the key knowledge necessary for fixing some machinery or code, (3) after much reflection, he realizes that "hero antics" are the only economically feasible way to clean up the city, and he cannot recruit anyone else to take up the hero mantle.
I can easily see an INTP becoming an Anti-hero of sorts if he largely disagrees with the way things are going in society. He would be able to satisfy his Fe needs by being either acknowledged, respected or feared for his actions.
 

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INTP villain: agree with OP.
Also: maybe he wants to do an experiment and decides he needs a whole world as his experimental system. We're pretty close to being a "closed system" so perhaps it's the best approximation to a "closed system" for ...?

INTP hero:
Obviously not for personal glory... maybe an INTP hero is born because ... (1) he is the villain's old teacher, and he realizes he made a mistake in his teachings so he wants to "correct" the teachings and remedy the situation, (2) he holds the key knowledge necessary for fixing some machinery or code, (3) after much reflection, he realizes that "hero antics" are the only economically feasible way to clean up the city, and he cannot recruit anyone else to take up the hero mantle.

No matter what, I think that the INTP hero would make for a very short story, or perhaps a very poor story (low in action).
The INTP hero would want to be liked (Fe) (so he can't easily be an anti-hero).
The INTP hero would be kind of useless at combat & at physicality.
The INTP hero would want to sit home and read or code.
The INTP hero would consider stuff like civil liberties, but wouldn't get really upset about violations of said liberties.

I can easily imagine an INTP sidekick to a hero, who is forced into taking on the role of hero for a short while to rescue the hero.
A hacker like Edward Snowden would be an INTP hero. Not that I'm saying Edward Snowden is necessarily an INTP.
 

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I couldn't imagine an INTP being in so close to the surface with his role. Sure he can play a big part, or even the biggest part despite not being the protagonist/antagonist (uncommon but not alien) but nothing quite as taxing as the lead roles. I could see a villain being born out of an INTP fulfilling his obligation to some close companion, while on the flip I see an INTP hero trekking through some abstract path of righteousness due to growing up with friends and family that weren't total shit.

Mostly I dislike the use of MBTI only when creating characters since what you're essentially only having access to is how they process information and the "horoscopes" - which can suffice when starting the inner wiring of your mary sue - is not nearly enough to make a round character. At least when writing something that breaks the reach of old J.K. Rowling. You'll constantly be referencing the MBTI horoscopes after you run into dead ends with the cogs, ending up with a copped out personality trope at best (which, again, is great if you're looking to write something simple/plot > character oriented. Not so hot when actually trying to write something without boring you and your readers to tears).

A good example of this would be Bones, while it's a good show in being an entertaining and very contemporary mystery/drama series, after watching for more than two seasons you can start to really see just how stale the characters are and how they make literally no significant development outside a few tweaks here and there (Booth's prejudices, Bone's feels, etc). This of course being in spite of the show running for a healthy nine seasons. Again, entertaining show, but also a bullet on a powerpoint when discussing flat characters. This is assumed (by me) because the character's development is obviously pin-pointed by late-third season, all the way from their flashy beginnings, to their meager ends, making for two MBTI contrived mannequins that hardly ever stretch outside their lame boundaries, and I feel weighted pity for any writer worth their salt that had to stomach that for so many consecutive seasons.

Now I could see the coupling of the MBTI and enneagram working out nicely when fleshing out a toon, otherwise I severely doubt MBTI's capability of cutting it for when it comes to making feasible while still-interesting characters, and even less reliable when making a hero or a villain.
 
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