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I'm stuck in a Ni-Fi loop at the moment, so external advice would be appreciated.

About myself:
I recently got my high school degree and am currently a mechanical engineer student in my 1st semester, just started out 4 weeks ago.

I chose ME because of the intellectual challenge and the problem solving aspects - something very important for an INTJ I would say. However, I'm not really into mechanical stuff itself and I have discovered that I am not really into the physics and maths either - I can probably pull it off if it's part of my ambitions. But I'm actually not interested in how a car works or how to store electrical energy. I love solving problems, however, I'm just not interested in everything else.

Now to the original topic:
Originally, I wanted to study Pharmacy for a long time, because I love chemistry and I am really interested in drugs. There's just something fascinating about molecules in pills and pellets that can literally change people's everyday lives. The idea of making people's lives easier is great.

However, what stopped me from taking pharmacy is that there are mostly only two paths to take when it comes to Pharmacy: The pharmacy industry and working in a pharmacy.

I don't want to work in the industry. Working in the lab for the rest of my life is not something I want to do.
Working in a pharmacy is something I could imagine myself doing - however, I'm very very afraid that I lack the social skills to do so and to get burned out easily by selling drugs everyday to strangers, to have no intellectual challenge and be stuck with SJ work forever.

Am I just paranoid about working in a pharmacy? Can one get used to SJ work and having to deal with customers everyday? Should I rather just do ME?
 

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Be you.

(WARNING: It's coming from someone who is 4w5 type)

You can try to figure out how to use your love for chemistry and find a path (maybe not a standard one) for yourself. Chemistry will be useful in a lot of fields. Maybe find another interest and combine both. You're young enough.

You always have time to get a job you'll hate.
 

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Plague Doctor
INTJ, 5w4, Ni-T type
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I suggest working as a pharmacy tech. Any sort of pharmacy that's in your area is probably looking for a pharmacy tech. Not only will you learn a buch about the names of drugs, the classes of them, and other useful things like that, but you'd be working in an environment where you'd end up in if you chose that route.

I worked as one for about a month and was like ... "hell, no".

But then, if it had been a passion, I would have been more likely to stay. In the states you have to be 18 or older and have a clean criminal record, pass a drug test, and you're good to go. The first few weeks is spent learning how to read doctor's scrawl and identifying drugs names that tend to get confused easily.
 
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Take this from someone that took a huge paycut to follow a passion project. I went from being a highly paid engineer to regular chemist. From a work environment that was comfortable [solo projects/a bunch of nerds] to one where office politics and fashion sense are king and queen. Even though I have objections re: where I'm at currently, I would make the same choice.

Having a few 'fit' issues at a job you're interested in is miles better than being proficient enough at a job you don't care about. The latter is a waste of life while the former tends to inspire growth.

There's pharmaceutical lobbying, sales, neutraceuticals, biotech, becoming a project manager or even regulations.*

And no, you don't have to be a social butterfly to be a pharmacist. Try not to make career decisions based on your perceived shortcomings. They're always subject to change.*
 

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exploring space
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What about a chemical engineer?
How do you know you don't want to work in the lab? Have you tried it? I think the mundane nature of working at a pharmacy will probably not satisfy your intellectual needs like you say. Some pharmacists still make their own things like creams and such.
Would you be interested in a general chemistry degree perhaps?
 

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have you taken any kind of vocational sorting aside from the mbti? i did something years ago called the strong vocational interest something which was pretty revelatory.

that's one thought. another is that if you haven't heard for 'occupation dictionaries' now is the time to find out. the canadian one is called the national occupational classification, and it's a mind-bender. this one appears to be american, and this one is for the uk. they may all be rebranded branches of some global ieee thing for all that i know, but you get the idea.

once you identify a broad field of 'passion' you can do more granular research just to see how many different real-world trees there really are in the forests you probably only know as 'pharamacy' and 'engineering' right now. i work in a profession that didn't even have an NOC name as recently as 2002, if that reassures you any as well :)

on your daily-task worries . . . umph. i'm 52. and when i was in high school i did some super-rudimentary 'career' sorter which took my replies to their questions quite literally. i was responding to them from the vantage of being 18, and when it had finished hearing about my introversion and my leave-me-alone-itis and my just-want-a-quiet-life-isms, it told me that god had put me on earth to become either a tree surgeon or maybe a short order cook. *big boggle*. what i actually do atm has nothing to do with those 'preferences', and in fact it has many aspects to it which flat-out contradict what i said i 'hated' or i 'could never' do well, back in that long-ago day. yet i think i'm one of the few people i've ever known who found a path and latched onto it and has almost never looked sideways or felt like i want to jump over the fence.

what i'm doing is right for me, no matter how many of the individual specifics of it seem on paper as if they'd be all wrong for me.
 

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I recently got my high school degree
Then you have plenty of time to try things out.

Am I just paranoid about working in a pharmacy? Can one get used to SJ work and having to deal with customers everyday? Should I rather just do ME?
Maybe, maybe and maybe. You are the only one who can answer these questions and you most likely will not find the answers within yourself. Get more evidence until the answers becomes obvious. Try it out, see for yourself, learn whatever lessons you can learn from the experience.

As cliché as it sounds, the best use of your 20s is to discover yourself. Trial and error is just as valuable as introspection in this regard. Taking a few internships in the fields that interest you is typically what I would expect here.
 
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