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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read how the majority of educators are SJ's but then the second largest group is NFs. Personally, I would think the NFs would do better in the regard that NFs follow their instinct as to what a kid needs while an SJ is more concerned about a student following the "rules". It honestly kind of angered me the one day when I saw a 1st grade teacher I was observing and I saw her lecture a kid because his locker was not "organized". The little boy was probably a young SP and simply is just not focused on organizing details... and we wonder why students become discouraged during school and don't want to learn - ugh!!


Anyway.... how many NFs out there are educators? If so, what grades do you teach? Elementary, middle, or high??
 

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I don't work as a teacher, but I do love teaching. When I was younger, probably around 11 or 12 years old, I would organize the neighbours kids, and play school, complete with schedule, homework and everything... And I still think I might end up as a teacher one day, I sure wouldn't mind... :happy:
 

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thegirlcandance, great topic and I agree with you. It's terrible when a teacher says something like that to a student, in fact it doesn't really matter about his locker, it's down to the student how he/she wants to have it. So long as they are learning and being prepared for an incredible life, then what does it matter?

Yes SJs suck the fun out of education and NF educators put it back in, however most NFs are busy wondering what to do with their lives, hence why many aren't in education. It took me twenty one years to even consider education and i'm considering becoming a primary school teacher, which I guess is elementary over there in the states. I met an ENFJ, and she teaches and me and her get along like a house on fire, and she is the first person i've met who teaches in a way that is so NF and so good. From doing work with her, the one thing I found is that teaching is incredibly tiring, after each day, I just wanted to switch off, however for the kids benefit we had to keep going, so if any NF is attempting to go into education. Introvert or not, make sure you have plenty of energy and eat and sleep well. There are many times when a student will come up to you, and you'll be tempted to say 'can't we do this tomorrow, i'm so tired' and then BAM! You'll have to start from scratch and they will need even more time to approach you again.

I'll write some more later.:cool:
 

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Yes SJs suck the fun out of education and NF educators put it back in
I understand you're generalizing here, and I think I see you basic point and why you say this, but at least in the public high school system in the US, I don't think there's that much difference in how the two temperaments teach. I teach pubic high school (I teach math), and I know two English teachers who are both NF's...one is an INFP, the other is an ENFJ. Constantly, and I mean constantly, the INFP teacher, who I'm very close friends with, agrees with me about just about everything in the education system and teaching. We face pretty much the same problems with students, we deal with pretty much the same thing, and we have pretty much the same opinions about education.

Even as an INFP, he understands the need for organization and structure to be a teacher...as creative and "fun" as your lessons can be, you still need rules and order as well. And not all SJ's are boring and uptight as teachers either.


So I see what you're saying, and there's probably some general truth to it. But really, I think there's a lot that teachers have in common that type doesn't distinguish between, and people of all 16 types can be good or bad teachers.




cardinalfire said:
however most NFs are busy wondering what to do with their lives, hence why many aren't in education. It took me twenty one years to even consider education and i'm considering becoming a primary school teacher, which I guess is elementary over there in the states. I met an ENFJ, and she teaches and me and her get along like a house on fire, and she is the first person i've met who teaches in a way that is so NF and so good. From doing work with her, the one thing I found is that teaching is incredibly tiring, after each day, I just wanted to switch off, however for the kids benefit we had to keep going, so if any NF is attempting to go into education. Introvert or not, make sure you have plenty of energy and eat and sleep well. There are many times when a student will come up to you, and you'll be tempted to say 'can't we do this tomorrow, i'm so tired' and then BAM! You'll have to start from scratch and they will need even more time to approach you again.

I think the bigger problem is that the US system is set up in a very SJ manner. So it's harder to actually teach because of all of the "standards" and the idea that everyone has to be the same. SJ's can fit into that kind of system more easily as teachers, but that doesn't mean that we're not frustrated to no end by the system's set up, which is ridiculous and stupid in so many ways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I understand you're generalizing here, and I think I see you basic point and why you say this, but at least in the public high school system in the US, I don't think there's that much difference in how the two temperaments teach. I teach pubic high school (I teach math), and I know two English teachers who are both NF's...one is an INFP, the other is an ENFJ. Constantly, and I mean constantly, the INFP teacher, who I'm very close friends with, agrees with me about just about everything in the education system and teaching. We face pretty much the same problems with students, we deal with pretty much the same thing, and we have pretty much the same opinions about education.

Even as an INFP, he understands the need for organization and structure to be a teacher...as creative and "fun" as your lessons can be, you still need rules and order as well. And not all SJ's are boring and uptight as teachers either.


So I see what you're saying, and there's probably some general truth to it. But really, I think there's a lot that teachers have in common that type doesn't distinguish between, and people of all 16 types can be good or bad teachers.







I think the bigger problem is that the US system is set up in a very SJ manner. So it's harder to actually teach because of all of the "standards" and the idea that everyone has to be the same. SJ's can fit into that kind of system more easily as teachers, but that doesn't mean that we're not frustrated to no end by the system's set up, which is ridiculous and stupid in so many ways.
The system is certainly frustrating. The way its set up causes kids to focus mostly on grades and not learning...... while also limiting teachers to focus on standards and state test scores rather than learning. Yes, we need to assess but are standardized exams the best method to determine if they are met? I keep trying to think of a better way to set up the system but I'm not quite sure. I thought I heard of some state changing the grading system somehow when I was taking my education classes.

Procedures and rules are necessary in order to minimize student confusion and so students know what they are being disciplined for. You can't just get mad for a kid doing something in class if you did not tell them what to do... then its your fault. Same goes with parenting (which most people don't learn or realize). For me, this is most difficult with high school students because they don't want to listen to anybody at that age and make their own decisions.
So I certainly do not mean in a concrete manner "SJs are bad teachers and NFs are good" but that there are often still some different views in teaching methods.... but even that is variable on the individual.



To go back and answer my own question of "What area of school do you like the most?" I know none is better, but what I am looking for is if certain MBTI types like certain levels more than others. I'm teaching 4 HS classes and 2 8th grade classes during student teaching. My favorite group? 8th grade -- I intuitively feel like you can make the biggest difference in their lives at that age... and they have the quirkiest humor!!

I read somewhere that if your trying to decide what level to teach, ask what you would rather deal with in the bathroom?
- If you want to find students needing help getting soap and needing to tell them how much paper towel to take --- teach elementary
- If you want to find students doing quirky/weird things -- teach middle school
- If you want to catch students smoking in the bathroom -- teach high school
 

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best teacher i ever had in my life was a super INFJ. she was my junior year AP english teacher, and i've never learned as much from any other class as i did from her.

it did sometimes get frustrating trying to understand her worldview and adhere to her ultra-high standards, but it was still worth it. if there's one thing i can say about that woman, it's that she actually gave a damn about her profession. she certainly was not lazy, which i find is the bane of a lot of teachers these days.

her passion for and knowledge of the subject made the class entertaining. she's actually a lot of what has been inspiring me lately to want to become an english teacher, and i can only hope i'd do half as good a job as her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
best teacher i ever had in my life was a super INFJ. she was my junior year AP english teacher, and i've never learned as much from any other class as i did from her.

it did sometimes get frustrating trying to understand her worldview and adhere to her ultra-high standards, but it was still worth it. if there's one thing i can say about that woman, it's that she actually gave a damn about her profession. she certainly was not lazy, which i find is the bane of a lot of teachers these days.

her passion for and knowledge of the subject made the class entertaining. she's actually a lot of what has been inspiring me lately to want to become an english teacher, and i can only hope i'd do half as good a job as her.
Just out of curiosity for my own personal growth and improvement (because, ya know, that's the INFJ thing to do)....

What type of methods did she use? What did you do every day in her class? Did she mix up instruction? How?
 

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Thanks for making this thread. I'm interested in becoming a teacher but I feel like I might not like the school environment.. I usually envision myself teaching needlework or something at a convent or as a private tutor/therapist type thing.

A lot of my motivation has also been due to what I've experienced at different colleges I've been to. Probably safe to assume that most of my teachers never studied psychology or something along that line, the way they deal with their students. I think it really takes someone who can see between the lines. There was a lot of drama at my schools because the teachers just go by what they see and hear but they never see the *point* or message behind things said and done and the importance of things not said. They were always easily manipulated, It was such a mess.

And then there was that they'd accept anyone who applied to the program. They do it year after year and I've asked alumni and they usually mention something about a student who shouldn't have been there. I don't know if there was maybe a quota the teachers had to fill. There were so many problems
 

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To go back and answer my own question of "What area of school do you like the most?" I know none is better, but what I am looking for is if certain MBTI types like certain levels more than others. I'm teaching 4 HS classes and 2 8th grade classes during student teaching. My favorite group? 8th grade -- I intuitively feel like you can make the biggest difference in their lives at that age... and they have the quirkiest humor!!

I read somewhere that if your trying to decide what level to teach, ask what you would rather deal with in the bathroom?
- If you want to find students needing help getting soap and needing to tell them how much paper towel to take --- teach elementary
- If you want to find students doing quirky/weird things -- teach middle school
- If you want to catch students smoking in the bathroom -- teach high school
What age are they during eighth grade? Here in the UK we just have primary and secondary school, I don't fully understand this middle school system you dicuss here.
 

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I'm seriously considering applying for Teach For America next year. I'd love to teach art or English. I could realistically see myself going back to school after graduation and getting my teaching certification, and if not, getting my masters and eventually getting a job as an art professor, even if it's just part-time. I love teaching and I've held tutoring jobs in the past. When I came to school I didn't think it's what I wanted to do with the rest of my life, but I've been rethinking it recently.

What age are they during eighth grade? Here in the UK we just have primary and secondary school, I don't fully understand this middle school system you dicuss here.
In the US, the system goes like this (generally):
1st grade through 4th grade (sometimes 5th): Elementary school
(sometimes 5th) 6th grade through 8th grade: Middle school (sometimes called Junior High)
9th grade through 12th grade: High school
 

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I understand you're generalizing here, and I think I see you basic point and why you say this, but at least in the public high school system in the US, I don't think there's that much difference in how the two temperaments teach. I teach pubic high school (I teach math), and I know two English teachers who are both NF's...one is an INFP, the other is an ENFJ. Constantly, and I mean constantly, the INFP teacher, who I'm very close friends with, agrees with me about just about everything in the education system and teaching. We face pretty much the same problems with students, we deal with pretty much the same thing, and we have pretty much the same opinions about education.

Even as an INFP, he understands the need for organization and structure to be a teacher...as creative and "fun" as your lessons can be, you still need rules and order as well. And not all SJ's are boring and uptight as teachers either.


So I see what you're saying, and there's probably some general truth to it. But really, I think there's a lot that teachers have in common that type doesn't distinguish between, and people of all 16 types can be good or bad teachers.







I think the bigger problem is that the US system is set up in a very SJ manner. So it's harder to actually teach because of all of the "standards" and the idea that everyone has to be the same. SJ's can fit into that kind of system more easily as teachers, but that doesn't mean that we're not frustrated to no end by the system's set up, which is ridiculous and stupid in so many ways.
Nice post, I just stumbled upon this animated speech and I highly recommend watching it.

 

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That's an awesome clip. I've heard him speak before but I hadn't heard that particular bit before.
 

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That video's great stuff! Thanks babblingbrook!

I wish more people would see these thing. Myself I was schooled by the Montessori method, and would absolutely say that I've benefited greatly from that, having been spared from many of the worst part of "normal" education.

Btw, Montessori and Jung apparently have some common denominators, as I've understood it, mainly seeing the child as having a personality and innate ideas and concept already from birth, as opposed to being a tabula rasa to only be stuffed with input in rearing and education.
 

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That video's great stuff! Thanks babblingbrook!

I wish more people would see these thing. Myself I was schooled by the Montessori method, and would absolutely say that I've benefited greatly from that, having been spared from many of the worst part of "normal" education.

Btw, Montessori and Jung apparently have some common denominators, as I've understood it, mainly seeing the child as having a personality and innate ideas and concept already from birth, as opposed to being a tabula rasa to only be stuffed with input in rearing and education.
Imagine what a child could do if he/she were unfolded and not molded! Imagine!
 

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I typed my Psych teacher as an ENFJ. She is great at teaching, although I find it odd how she can be a bit disorganized, yet still so...J. Perhaps that's what teaching all day does to you.
 

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I worked as a teacher at a school for autistic children for a few months. I was good at building a rapport with the children initially, but the methodology this school used was very intense and detail-oriented, if I was distracted for two seconds it would be a huge deal, so I wasn't very good at that particular job. It was a really intense and constant form of ABA, and I recognize that it's the most effective treatment for autism currently, but it's just not something I can do. I think an NFJ would be better at it.

I'm about to begin a job teaching English (as a foreign language) to elementary children. I'm a bit intimidated, my school is really disorganized which I'm sure will suit me later but right now I have no idea how much English these kids understand or what supplies are available to me in teaching. I'm trying to make first-day lesson plans but can't come up with anything that makes me feel more confident than walking in and winging it. I'll be honest, mostly I'm here because it's a job with low hours and tons of vacation and I get to live on a French-governed tropical island, but I hope I manage to teach these kids really well while I'm here. I also want to set up some private conversation lessons on the side for adults, I took Spanish conversation classes and it was always a really great environment with people talking about their lives and culture.
 

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One of my teacher is INFJ I think. I like how he teaches because he force us to make mistakes, push our reasoning further than what is actually asked in the question while working in groups so we can learn better. He finds all kinds of comparison, re-conceptualize and simplify what we are learning to make it more accessible to everyone in the class. He knows exactly on which part of the subject students have an harder time with and emphasize on it.

He's definitely one of the best teacher I had so far.
 

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This is such a good thread, and Sir Ken Robinson is one of my heroes, I love want that guy has to say and i've watched a number of videos with him giving speeches and each one has been great and funny.


 
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