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After watching Michael Pierce's videos multiple times, I'll try to sum it up. Please excuse me if it's not completely right.

Se/Ni
Se takes in the world as-is. For instance, if it sees a red balloon, it thinks "That's a red balloon", and nothing else. Ni then starts connecting what has been seen to what the person knows. So it might say "That reminds me of a movie that used a red balloon, wouldn't it be cool if I made a movie in which everything is grey except for this one balloon?"

Ne/Si
Ne takes in the world through patterns and associations. It thinks "The balloon is red like the eyes of my pet rabbit", and sees these things simultaneously with the object it is looking at. Si then views the attributes of objects as a matter of interpretation. It might think "That is a fine shade of red".
 

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I don't have it down perfectly but let me give it a shot.

I personally prefer to think of them as 'mythologies'. They are personalized, highly subjective views of reality, maps on which the user treads. But Si is physical and Ni is abstract. Both seek a sort of perfection, but of a different nature.

For instance, Remembrance of Things Past is probably the ultimate Si book. In the very first section, we see the narrator walking down two paths, "Swann's Way" and "The Guermantes Way", so named because individuals named Swann and Guermantes lived along those paths. Then we see two separate volumes: "Swann's Way" and "Guermantes Way" which deal respectively with the affairs of Swann, and of the Guermantes. But you can see that the narrator has forged his own mythology, and it is set in the shape of his hometown. Does that make sense? Honestly, if you want a good idea of Si, read Remembrance of Things Past. You see involuntary memory: tasting a madeleine dipped in tea, which brings back distinct memories of a time in his life, and an idealization of the physical which is difficult to describe; I'll give you a couple quotes:
The name of Parma, one of the towns that I most longed to visit, after reading the Chartreuse, seeming to me compact and glossy, violet-tinted, soft, if anyone were to speak of such or such a house in Parma, in which I should be lodged, he would give me the pleasure of thinking that I was to inhabit a dwelling that was compact and glossy, violet-tinted, soft, and that bore no relation to the houses in any other town in Italy, since I could imagine it only by the aid of that heavy syllable of the name of Parma, in which no breath of air stirred, and of all that I had made it assume of Stendhalian sweetness and the reflected hue of violets. And when I thought of Florence, it was of a town miraculously embalmed, and flower-like, since it was called the City of the Lilies, and its Cathedral, Our Lady of the Flower. As for Balbec, it was one of those names in which, as on an old piece of Norman pottery that still keeps the colour of the earth from which it was fashioned, one sees depicted still the representation of some long-abolished custom, of some feudal right, of the former condition of some place, of an obsolete way of pronouncing the language, which had shaped and wedded its incongruous syllables and which I never doubted that I should find spoken there at once, even by the inn-keeper who would pour me out coffee and milk on my arrival, taking me down to watch the turbulent sea, unchained, before the church; to whom I lent the aspect, disputatious, solemn and mediaeval, of some character in one of the old romances...And yet nothing could have differed more utterly, either, from the real Balbec than that other Balbec of which I had often dreamed, on stormy days, when the wind was so strong that Françoise, as she took me to the Champs-Elysées, would warn me not to walk too near the side of the street, or I might have my head knocked off by a falling slate, and would recount to me, with many lamentations, the terrible disasters and shipwrecks that were reported in the newspaper.
The places that we have known belong now only to the little world of space on which we map them for our own convenience. None of them was ever more than a thin slice, held between the contiguous impressions that composed our life at that time; remembrance of a particular form is but regret for a particular moment; and houses, roads, avenues are as fugitive, alas, as the years.
Practically, for me, Si means that I like routine (until my Ne gets bored), I like things which speak to an eternal, unchanging world, I have my own ideas of how things are, and I care for things to have an intrinsic meaning to them, which nevertheless I have imposed on it.

Ni is...different. I don't have it, so I can't talk about it well...maybe @alittlebear can help?) I know it sort-of...does the opposite, in the same way. Instead of attaching meaning to objects, it extracts meaning, and reduces them to symbols. It also have a personalized map of the world, but it's quite different from Si's map. Practically, Ni-users are able to look far ahead into the future, they are the true 'big-picture thinkers' (vs. Si which focuses on details and prefers a more static approach to time) Dostoevsky by most accounts is a Ni-dom, as is, I believe, Joyce.
 

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So it might say "That reminds me of a movie that used a red balloon, wouldn't it be cool if I made a movie in which everything is grey except for this one balloon?"
Wouldn't the bolded be Si?
 
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We already have tons of threads on this.
 
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Here is a quick comparison of Ni and Si made by Jung.


Intuition, in the introverted attitude, is directed upon the inner object, a term we might justly apply to the elements of the unconscious. For the relation of inner objects to consciousness is entirely analogous to that of outer objects, although theirs is a psychological and not a physical reality. Inner objects appear to the intuitive perception as subjective images of things, which, though not met with in external experience, really determine the contents of the unconscious, i.e. the collective unconscious, in the last resort. Naturally, in their per se character, these contents are, not accessible to experience, a quality which they have in common with the outer object. For just as outer objects correspond only relatively with our perceptions of them, so the phenomenal forms of the inner object are also relative; products of their (to us) inaccessible essence and of the peculiar nature of the intuitive function. Like sensation, intuition also has its subjective factor, which is suppressed to the farthest limit in the extraverted intuition, but which becomes the decisive factor in the intuition of the introvert. Although this intuition may receive its impetus from outer objects, it is never arrested by the external possibilities, but stays with that factor which the outer object releases within.

Whereas introverted sensation is mainly confined to the perception of particular innervation phenomena by way of the unconscious, and does not go beyond them, intuition represses this side of the subjective factor and perceives the image which has really occasioned the innervation. Supposing, for instance, a man is overtaken by a psychogenic attack of giddiness. Sensation is arrested by the peculiar character of this innervationdisturbance, perceiving all its qualities, its intensity, its transient course, the nature of its origin and disappearance [p. 506] in their every detail, without raising the smallest inquiry concerning the nature of the thing which produced the disturbance, or advancing anything as to its content. Intuition, on the other hand, receives from the sensation only the impetus to immediate activity; it peers behind the scenes, quickly perceiving the inner image that gave rise to the specific phenomenon, i.e. the attack of vertigo, in the present case. It sees the image of a tottering man pierced through the heart by an arrow. This image fascinates the intuitive activity; it is arrested by it, and seeks to explore every detail of it. It holds fast to the vision, observing with the liveliest interest how the picture changes, unfolds further, and finally fades. In this way introverted intuition perceives all the background processes of consciousness with almost the same distinctness as extraverted sensation senses outer objects. For intuition, therefore, the unconscious images attain to the dignity of things or objects. But, because intuition excludes the co-operation of sensation, it obtains either no knowledge at all or at the best a very inadequate awareness of the innervation-disturbances or of the physical effects produced by the unconscious images. Accordingly, the images appear as though detached from the subject, as though existing in themselves without relation to the person.
 

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Ni uses the past to anticipate the future.

Si uses the past to analyze the present.

Another way you could think of it is with their pairings.

Se sees the present as malleable and open but each choice leads to a definite, concrete, and singular outcome via Ni.

Ne sees concrete, real, and absolute potential scenarios and outcomes. For them the future is open and malleable but the present is fixed via Si.

So often the Ni user seeks to manipulate the present so as to go down the best path.

While the Si user looks at all the options so they can pick the best present situation to be in.
 

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Ni uses the past to anticipate the future.

Si uses the past to analyze the present.

Another way you could think of it is with their pairings.

Se sees the present as malleable and open but each choice leads to a definite, concrete, and singular outcome via Ni.

Ne sees concrete, real, and absolute potential scenarios and outcomes. For them the future is open and malleable but the present is fixed via Si.

So often the Ni user seeks to manipulate the present so as to go down the best path.

While the Si user looks at all the options so they can pick the best present situation to be in.
Hey this is interesting :)
I've never looked at it that way
 

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I will try to simplify Ni vs Si but you may be surprised and not agree.
Here is a quick comparison of Ni and Si made by Jung.
"Intuition, in the introverted attitude, is directed upon the inner object, a term we might justly apply to the elements of the unconscious. For the relation of inner objects to consciousness is entirely analogous to that of outer objects, although theirs is a psychological and not a physical reality. Inner objects appear to the intuitive perception as subjective images of things, which, though not met with in external experience, really determine the contents of the unconscious, i.e. the collective unconscious, in the last resort. Naturally, in their per se character, these contents are, not accessible to experience, a quality which they have in common with the outer object. For just as outer objects correspond only relatively with our perceptions of them, so the phenomenal forms of the inner object are also relative; products of their (to us) inaccessible essence and of the peculiar nature of the intuitive function. Like sensation, intuition also has its subjective factor, which is suppressed to the farthest limit in the extraverted intuition, but which becomes the decisive factor in the intuition of the introvert. Although this intuition may receive its impetus from outer objects, it is never arrested by the external possibilities, but stays with that factor which the outer object releases within.

Whereas introverted sensation is mainly confined to the perception of particular innervation phenomena by way of the unconscious, and does not go beyond them, intuition represses this side of the subjective factor and perceives the image which has really occasioned the innervation. Supposing, for instance, a man is overtaken by a psychogenic attack of giddiness. Sensation is arrested by the peculiar character of this innervationdisturbance, perceiving all its qualities, its intensity, its transient course, the nature of its origin and disappearance [p. 506] in their every detail, without raising the smallest inquiry concerning the nature of the thing which produced the disturbance, or advancing anything as to its content. Intuition, on the other hand, receives from the sensation only the impetus to immediate activity; it peers behind the scenes, quickly perceiving the inner image that gave rise to the specific phenomenon, i.e. the attack of vertigo, in the present case. It sees the image of a tottering man pierced through the heart by an arrow. This image fascinates the intuitive activity; it is arrested by it, and seeks to explore every detail of it. It holds fast to the vision, observing with the liveliest interest how the picture changes, unfolds further, and finally fades. In this way introverted intuition perceives all the background processes of consciousness with almost the same distinctness as extraverted sensation senses outer objects. For intuition, therefore, the unconscious images attain to the dignity of things or objects. But, because intuition excludes the co-operation of sensation, it obtains either no knowledge at all or at the best a very inadequate awareness of the innervation-disturbances or of the physical effects produced by the unconscious images. Accordingly, the images appear as though detached from the subject, as though existing in themselves without relation to the person."
Si is about particulars and is local in space and time; Ni is about a whole picture and is global relative to Si. They oppose each other only because Si tries to focus while Ni tries to capture. Both are alike in that they are perceptions and are immediate. They have nothing to do with past or future.

For example, my Ni says to me I am right about this in the sense of having captured distinguishing concepts. I pass no judgment on any approval of this usage. It may or may not meet with approval. If I wish to promote approval, that is a desire or feeling, Fi or Fe. Feeling and thought is where the future is associated with intuition as feeling or thought pushes a choice.

My Si says to me I have mentioned Ni and Si above neglecting Ne and Se comments. Those are particular Si memories. Although memories are about the past (in this case a few seconds ago), I experience them in the present. That is Si.

I have an intuition that Si and Ni could be scaled. That is, Si and Ni are extremes and reality is somewhere in between, so why can't one perceive something in between the local and the global? (Perhaps these are experienced in difference parts of the brain and can be observed objectively.) I don't have an Si example. Perhaps the reader has one. If neither you nor I can find a clear example of Ni/Si merged, my thinking says my intuition is wrong and Si and Ni are truly polarized.

Now what about what Jung said? I don't see him as clearly defining intuition, but I have bolded his words where I thought he was distinguishing particulars from globals:

sensation:particular, peculiar, detail
intuition: images, collective, vision, processes
 
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I don't have it down perfectly but let me give it a shot.

I personally prefer to think of them as 'mythologies'. They are personalized, highly subjective views of reality, maps on which the user treads. But Si is physical and Ni is abstract. Both seek a sort of perfection, but of a different nature.

For instance, Remembrance of Things Past is probably the ultimate Si book. In the very first section, we see the narrator walking down two paths, "Swann's Way" and "The Guermantes Way", so named because individuals named Swann and Guermantes lived along those paths. Then we see two separate volumes: "Swann's Way" and "Guermantes Way" which deal respectively with the affairs of Swann, and of the Guermantes. But you can see that the narrator has forged his own mythology, and it is set in the shape of his hometown. Does that make sense? Honestly, if you want a good idea of Si, read Remembrance of Things Past. You see involuntary memory: tasting a madeleine dipped in tea, which brings back distinct memories of a time in his life, and an idealization of the physical which is difficult to describe; I'll give you a couple quotes:



Practically, for me, Si means that I like routine (until my Ne gets bored), I like things which speak to an eternal, unchanging world, I have my own ideas of how things are, and I care for things to have an intrinsic meaning to them, which nevertheless I have imposed on it.

Ni is...different. I don't have it, so I can't talk about it well...maybe @alittlebear can help?) I know it sort-of...does the opposite, in the same way. Instead of attaching meaning to objects, it extracts meaning, and reduces them to symbols. It also have a personalized map of the world, but it's quite different from Si's map. Practically, Ni-users are able to look far ahead into the future, they are the true 'big-picture thinkers' (vs. Si which focuses on details and prefers a more static approach to time) Dostoevsky by most accounts is a Ni-dom, as is, I believe, Joyce.
This is interesting and may explain why I couldn't continue with Proust after twenty pages, but am completely absorbed by Dostoevsky and Joyce. They are INFJs, I believe. I'd add Hermann Hesse and Thomas Mann, as well. Their characters are more representations of different perspectives, which are used to communicate the writers' own abstract ideas. With INFPs, like Proust possibly, their characters seem to have more of a "fullness" to them, as if the writer has thought of an entire history for their characters. I could see John Steinbeck here too, but it's been a while since I've read his works.

Most simply, I see Si as seeking to preserve or maintain things as they are, while Ni seeks to point the way forward. When Ni is coupled with Fe, it envisions a more perfect, ethical society, and thus is very critical of the present moral character of social institutions or their larger social group (family, nation, etc). Dostoevsky's and Joyce's works both were concerned with the state of their home nation (Dostoevsky: Russia and Joyce: Ireland) and believed they had a better way of seeing things. I'd add Gandhi, Dante, and Thomas More (who wrote Utopia) to this, too.
 

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From the official MBTI site:

Introverted sensing compares present facts and experiences to past experience, trusts the past, and stores sensory data for future use.

Introverted intuition looks at consistency of ideas and thoughts with an internal framework and trusts flashes from the unconscious, which may be hard for others to understand.

Jung defined it much differently, however:

Introverted sensation is the process of viewing reality through a subjective filter. Jung called the result of this a "psychic mirror-world."

Introverted intuition is the process of reaching new possibilities directly from the subjective, internal realm. As a result, the visions that it creates tend to be confusing and unrealistic.
 

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From the official MBTI site:

Introverted sensing compares present facts and experiences to past experience, trusts the past, and stores sensory data for future use.

Introverted intuition looks at consistency of ideas and thoughts with an internal framework and trusts flashes from the unconscious, which may be hard for others to understand.

Jung defined it much differently, however:

Introverted sensation is the process of viewing reality through a subjective filter. Jung called the result of this a "psychic mirror-world."

Introverted intuition is the process of reaching new possibilities directly from the subjective, internal realm. As a result, the visions that it creates tend to be confusing and unrealistic.
If I told you a circus was a place where you could have loads of fun, take a date on Saturday night or children could see exotic animals and clowns perform, would you agree? Contrast this with a dictionary definition:

"Full Definition of CIRCUS
1
a : a large arena enclosed by tiers of seats on three or all four sides and used especially for sports or spectacles (as athletic contests, exhibitions of horsemanship, or in ancient times chariot racing)
b : a public spectacle

2
a : an arena often covered by a tent and used for variety shows usually including feats of physical skill, wild animal acts, and performances by clowns
b : a circus performance
c : the physical plant, livestock, and personnel of such a circus
d : something suggestive of a circus (as in frenzied activity, sensationalism, theatricality, or razzle-dazzle) <a media circus>"
Circus | Definition of circus by Merriam-Webster

Which look at circus tells you what a circus is and which tells you possibilities which may or may not be?

When contrasting Si and Ni, there is a difference between being interesting/ suggestive / creative/ associative versus technical/ formal/ accurate/ minimalist #11.
 

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I don't have it down perfectly but let me give it a shot.

I personally prefer to think of them as 'mythologies'. They are personalized, highly subjective views of reality, maps on which the user treads. But Si is physical and Ni is abstract. Both seek a sort of perfection, but of a different nature.

For instance, Remembrance of Things Past is probably the ultimate Si book. In the very first section, we see the narrator walking down two paths, "Swann's Way" and "The Guermantes Way", so named because individuals named Swann and Guermantes lived along those paths. Then we see two separate volumes: "Swann's Way" and "Guermantes Way" which deal respectively with the affairs of Swann, and of the Guermantes. But you can see that the narrator has forged his own mythology, and it is set in the shape of his hometown. Does that make sense? Honestly, if you want a good idea of Si, read Remembrance of Things Past. You see involuntary memory: tasting a madeleine dipped in tea, which brings back distinct memories of a time in his life, and an idealization of the physical which is difficult to describe; I'll give you a couple quotes:



Practically, for me, Si means that I like routine (until my Ne gets bored), I like things which speak to an eternal, unchanging world, I have my own ideas of how things are, and I care for things to have an intrinsic meaning to them, which nevertheless I have imposed on it.

Ni is...different. I don't have it, so I can't talk about it well...maybe @alittlebear can help?) I know it sort-of...does the opposite, in the same way. Instead of attaching meaning to objects, it extracts meaning, and reduces them to symbols. It also have a personalized map of the world, but it's quite different from Si's map. Practically, Ni-users are able to look far ahead into the future, they are the true 'big-picture thinkers' (vs. Si which focuses on details and prefers a more static approach to time) Dostoevsky by most accounts is a Ni-dom, as is, I believe, Joyce.
This was a VERY good and resourceful post JITD. Why on earth do you question yourself? Lol. I think you know you, and you definitely know the theory enough to be able to come to a concrete decision on your type. Go with your gut, because I think you've got it. ;)
 

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Ni uses the past to anticipate the future.

Si uses the past to analyze the present.

Another way you could think of it is with their pairings.

Se sees the present as malleable and open but each choice leads to a definite, concrete, and singular outcome via Ni.

Ne sees concrete, real, and absolute potential scenarios and outcomes. For them the future is open and malleable but the present is fixed via Si.

So often the Ni user seeks to manipulate the present so as to go down the best path.

While the Si user looks at all the options so they can pick the best present situation to be in.
This is probably my favorite explanation of the 2. Excellent. :)
 
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This was a VERY good and resourceful post JITD. Why on earth do you question yourself? Lol. I think you know you, and you definitely know the theory enough to be able to come to a concrete decision on your type. Go with your gut, because I think you've got it. ;)
Thank you)
I...yeah. Maybe. Do you think ESFJ then?
on the other thread we were talking how I might be a Fi user, the arguments were pretty convincing
 
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Thank you)
I...yeah. Maybe. Do you think ESFJ then?
on the other thread we were talking how I might be a Fi user, the arguments were pretty convincing
Honestly, I truly feel deep down in MY bones, that YOU know deep own in YOUR bones what your type is.

The perceiving axes I could see either way.
(You know how I feel on Fi for you ;) ... but how do YOU feel about it? o_O )
 
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