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An oxymoron, I know, right? But as a history major and an aspiring fiction writer, I've been wondering what ENFPs and INFPs would look like in a really constricting cultural setting. In the modern Western culture, individuality is celebrated, in theory if not always in practice, so nfps are usually proud of their quirkiness. What is the experience like in places/times where having strong individual feelings is suspect, original ideas are not encouraged, and you basically have to act to fulfill your role in society? What would the nfp feel, how would they behave. For example, in some periods of imperial Chinese history, a woman basically had to act Fe. Their role was to keep their husband and the whole household happy. And then there are some societies that want everyone to be STJ. Who would have a harder time fitting in, INFP or ENFP? Or would they find creative ways to work the system and express themselves within it? Or would they basically lose themselves to it? Thoughts?
 

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Hmm interesting topic! I currently live in a place where strict rules are enforced and many in society are still traditionalists under the surface. It is extremely stifling and it makes me so unhappy to have to follow rules that I see as meaningless or actually detrimental to what they were supposed to achieve. I think this brought out the rebel in me.
For example, there are very strict traffic rules in this place. What I do is I go rollerblading in the streets at night... And I bring an army of people with me ;)


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I'd be like Mulan without the saving of China and probably get an arrow to the knee for at least attempted to do so.



I'm sure it would come out i'm sure in certain situations.
 

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An oxymoron, I know, right? But as a history major and an aspiring fiction writer, I've been wondering what ENFPs and INFPs would look like in a really constricting cultural setting. In the modern Western culture, individuality is celebrated, in theory if not always in practice, so nfps are usually proud of their quirkiness. What is the experience like in places/times where having strong individual feelings is suspect, original ideas are not encouraged, and you basically have to act to fulfill your role in society? What would the nfp feel, how would they behave. For example, in some periods of imperial Chinese history, a woman basically had to act Fe. Their role was to keep their husband and the whole household happy. And then there are some societies that want everyone to be STJ. Who would have a harder time fitting in, INFP or ENFP? Or would they find creative ways to work the system and express themselves within it? Or would they basically lose themselves to it? Thoughts?
I meant to write sooner, but I completely forgot about this thread. :laughing: and +1 on being a history major. That was my major, so I'll give a nice historical reference.

They would look like the Quakers before they left England for Pennsylvania.

"In fact, Pennsylvania was created by perhaps the most controversial religious cult of the era, a group contemporaries accused of undermining “peace and order” and “sowing . . . the seeds of immediate ruin of . . . religion, Church order . . . and . . . the state.” Difficult though it may be to understand today, the Quakers were considered a radical and dangerous force, the late-seventeenth-century equivalent of crossing the hippie movement with the Church of Scientology. Quakers spurned the social conventions of the day, refusing to bow or doff their hats to social superiors or to take part in formal religious services of any sort.

They rejected the authority of church hierarchies, held women to be spiritually equal to men, and questioned the legitimacy of slavery. Their leaders strode naked on city streets or, daubed with excrement, into Anglican churches in efforts to provide models of humility; one Quaker rode naked on a donkey into England’s second-largest city on Palm Sunday in an unpopular reenactment of Christ’s entry into Jerusalem.''

Woodard, Colin (2011-09-29). American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America (Kindle Locations 1529-1537). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.
 

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I meant to write sooner, but I completely forgot about this thread. :laughing: and +1 on being a history major. That was my major, so I'll give a nice historical reference.

They would look like the Quakers before they left England for Pennsylvania.

"In fact, Pennsylvania was created by perhaps the most controversial religious cult of the era, a group contemporaries accused of undermining “peace and order” and “sowing . . . the seeds of immediate ruin of . . . religion, Church order . . . and . . . the state.” Difficult though it may be to understand today, the Quakers were considered a radical and dangerous force, the late-seventeenth-century equivalent of crossing the hippie movement with the Church of Scientology. Quakers spurned the social conventions of the day, refusing to bow or doff their hats to social superiors or to take part in formal religious services of any sort.

They rejected the authority of church hierarchies, held women to be spiritually equal to men, and questioned the legitimacy of slavery. Their leaders strode naked on city streets or, daubed with excrement, into Anglican churches in efforts to provide models of humility; one Quaker rode naked on a donkey into England’s second-largest city on Palm Sunday in an unpopular reenactment of Christ’s entry into Jerusalem.''

Woodard, Colin (2011-09-29). American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America (Kindle Locations 1529-1537). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.
Ermagersh guess what, I am escaping aforementioned oppressive country for awhile... And guess where I am...


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I dont think most NFPs would truly succeed in a culturally restricting setting. That's why I never really like learning about Medieval Europe or Renaissance, it's crazy how many social boundaries and rules there were! I think your average NFP would be driven crazy by the gender gaps and the rigid social structures. From personal experience Im just not myself when in an STJ environment, when it happens I look very quiet and deflated, but when outside of it it's like a completely different world!
 
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