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You don't understand. You updated your résumé, you're applying to jobs every day, you've cleaned up your digital dirt and you network every day.


Yet here you still are on the unemployment list. What is wrong with employers?

Unfortunately, many job seekers don't stop to consider that the problem might not be employers but themselves.


It's a hard concept that most job seekers have trouble wrapping their heads around, but applicants frequently (and inadvertently) display signs that tell an employer that they're not the best fit for the job.
According to a 2009 CareerBuilder survey, 47 percent of employers said that finding qualified applicants is their biggest hiring challenge. When asked to identify the most valuable characteristics in new hires, employers cited multitasking, initiative and creative problem-solving.

Do you lack what employers want? Yes, there are fewer jobs and there is more competition, but are you doing everything you can?


Here are 10 reasons why employers might have passed you by.



1. You lie
Any lies you tell in your job search, whether on your résumé or in an interview, will come back to haunt you. In a 2008 CareerBuilder survey, 49 percent of hiring managers reported they caught a candidate lying on his or her résumé; of those employers, 57 percent said they automatically dismissed the applicant.

Everything you tell an employer can be discovered, so it behooves you to be honest from the get-go. If you're concerned about something in your past, invention is not the answer. Use your cover letter to tell your story, focusing on your strengths and accomplishments and explaining any areas of concern if needed.


2. You have a potty mouth
It's certainly tempting to tell anyone who will listen how big of a (insert expletive here) your current boss is, but a hiring manager for a new job is not that person. A 2009 CareerBuilder survey showed that 44 percent of employers said that talking negatively about current or previous employers was one of the most detrimental mistakes a candidate can make.

Find a way to turn those negative things job into positives. If you can't get along with your co-workers, for example, tell the prospective employer that you're looking for a work environment where you feel like you're part of a team and your current position doesn't allow for that kind of atmosphere.


3. You don't show long-term potential
Employers want people in their organization to work their way up, so it's best to show that you want to and can grow with the company. If you were asked where you see yourself in five years and you gave an answer that wasn't related to the position or company you're interviewing with, kiss your chances goodbye.

Ask questions like, "What type of career movement do you envision for the most successful candidate in this role?" It shows that you have envisioned your future at the company.


4. You have serious digital dirt
Social networking sites and online searches are the newest way that many employers are checking up on prospective hires. A 2009 CareerBuilder survey showed that 45 percent of employers use social networking sites to research candidates. Thirty-five percent of those employers found content that caused them to dismiss the candidate.

Make sure to remove any photos, content or links that can work against you in an employer's eyes.


5. You don't know ... well, anything
In two separate 2009 CareerBuilder surveys, 58 percent of employers said that coming to the interview with no knowledge of the company was a turnoff, and 49 percent said that not asking good questions cost candidates a job offer. Plain and simple, do your homework before an interview.

Explore the company online, prepare answers to questions and have someone give you a mock interview. The more prepared you are, the more employers will take you seriously.

6. You acted bored, cocky or disinterested
A little enthusiasm never hurt anyone, especially when it comes to a potential new job. Forty-five percent of employers in a 2009 CareerBuilder survey said that the biggest mistake candidates made in the interview was appearing disinterested and 42 percent said appearing arrogant cost applicants the job.

Every business wants to put their most enthusiastic people forward with important clients and customers, so acting the opposite will get you nowhere.


7. You were a little too personal
Seventeen percent of employers said that candidates who provided too much personal information in the interview essentially blew their chances at the job, according to a 2009 CareerBuilder survey. Not only does personal information offend some people, but anytime you talk about topics such as your hobbies, race, age or religion, you're setting yourself up for bias.

Though it's illegal for employers to discriminate against applicants because of any of these factors, some will do so, regardless.

8. You were all dollars, no sense
As a general rule of thumb, you should never bring up salary before the employer does. Doing so is tacky and makes the employer think that you care about the money involved, not about helping the employer succeed.

If the topic does arise, however, be honest about your salary history. Employers can verify your salary in a matter of minutes these days, so lying only makes you look bad.


9. You didn't -- or can't -- give examples

Hiring managers want people who can prove that they will increase the organization's revenues, decrease its costs or help it succeed in some way. If all you give to an employer is a bunch of empty words about your accomplishments, you don't demonstrate how you can help the company.

In fact, 35 percent of employers said that the most detrimental mistake candidates make is not providing specific examples in the interview. The more you can quantify your work, the better.


10. You don't have enough experience
Managers don't have as much time as they used to to train and mentor new employees. The more experience you have, the more likely you are to hit the ground running without a lot of hand-holding.

The best way to show that you know what you're doing is to give the employer concrete examples of your experience in a given job duty.
 

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I personally hate #10... Its hard to get over that one. If you don't have a job, you wont have experience, if you don't have experience, you wont have the job... ~.~ I guess it's not that cut and dry, but still.

Also I have found that, not being able to work "anytime" seems to be a turn off. I missed out on a few jobs, due to my school schedule.
 

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:tongue:I've hired, fired and appraised many o employee in my day, there are also some other basics for those that have a tough time:

Here it is, there is one job posted and the hiring manager receives 50, 100, 200 or more applicants for the position, it's all about weeding everyone out. It's too hard to look at all of them at face value at the beginning, so the first step is to browse through the resumes that have the immediate red flags, they go straight into the trash bucket. Then you start weeding through the rest, the next phase of weeding through is the interview. They will judge you on many different things and all of the above are good, but there is plenty more to consider.

1. Never chew gum on a phone interview, in person interview, webcam interview... or any form of interview at all.

2. At least make the attempt to tuck in your shirt and wipe away some wrinkles... yes, physical appearance of cleanliness and tidiness is a good indicator to them of what kind of person you may be... even if it's not a correct assumption.

3. How do you shake hands or shake at all? Limp, clammy and shaky handshakes don't give as good an impression as a firm, tight handshake.

4. Eye contact, look at the person who is speaking to you, don't look up, down, around and try and answer the question without even looking at them.

5. Keep the fidgeting to a minimum, clasp your hands or cross your ankles, but try to keep them from flailing all about.

6. ums, likes, you-knows, uhuh, watch the space fillers, nothing can get as annoying to listen to as someone saying like and you-know 40 times in a 30 minute interview.

7. Bring your resume with you...

Hmm, I've actually got a lot on my list, I'll stop there for now, but I thought these tips were different from the kind listed in the article you posted... gotta be thorough!
 

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I personally hate #10... Its hard to get over that one. If you don't have a job, you wont have experience, if you don't have experience, you wont have the job... ~.~ I guess it's not that cut and dry, but still.

I am in this paradox now and trying to find a job. I never write a resume, because I've only had two jobs in my 27 years. I feel like it would be easier to get hired if I could list a bunch of impressive stuff, but it's just not there. I don't think it's really my fault. I stuck with one of those jobs for 5 years, and I've never been fired. Surley that counts for something. EVERYONE has to actually get started somewhere.

Also, I get stereotyped because of my age. Middle aged people talk like age discrimination only goes one way, but I don't think so. Believe it or not, I am actually not an idiot.
 

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10. You don't have enough experience
Managers don't have as much time as they used to to train and mentor new employees. The more experience you have, the more likely you are to hit the ground running without a lot of hand-holding.

The best way to show that you know what you're doing is to give the employer concrete examples of your experience in a given job duty.
Catch 22 for me (and teenage applicants). Can't get a job without experience, can't get experience without a job.
 

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3. How do you shake hands or shake at all? Limp, clammy and shaky handshakes don't give as good an impression as a firm, tight handshake.
Wow.... What does a handshake have to do with an interviewee's capability as an employee? What if the person has overactive sweat glands on their hands?

Who even wants to work for an employer who is that nitpicky about insignificant factors?

4. Eye contact, look at the person who is speaking to you, don't look up, down, around and try and answer the question without even looking at them.

5. Keep the fidgeting to a minimum, clasp your hands or cross your ankles, but try to keep them from flailing all about.

6. ums, likes, you-knows, uhuh, watch the space fillers, nothing can get as annoying to listen to as someone saying like and you-know 40 times in a 30 minute interview.
How dare someone be nervous on a job interview! I'd say the people you don't hire are dodging a bullet...


1. You lie
Any lies you tell in your job search, whether on your résumé or in an interview, will come back to haunt you. In a 2008 CareerBuilder survey, 49 percent of hiring managers reported they caught a candidate lying on his or her résumé; of those employers, 57 percent said they automatically dismissed the applicant.

Everything you tell an employer can be discovered, so it behooves you to be honest from the get-go. If you're concerned about something in your past, invention is not the answer. Use your cover letter to tell your story, focusing on your strengths and accomplishments and explaining any areas of concern if needed.
This is a lie, because the rest of the list confirms employers want people to BS them. The person who lies the best gets the job.
 

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Wow.... What does a handshake have to do with an interviewee's capability as an employee? What if the person has overactive sweat glands on their hands?

Who even wants to work for an employer who is that nitpicky about insignificant factors?
- Its to show how confident the person is. If she/he has a weak limp shake, they probably have a self-esteem issue. As for the firm shake, majority of the people has a firm brain that can't be rambled.
Sweaty hands? Wipe them on your dress pants/skirt. Simple.
I sure don't want to shake a sweaty damp and sticky hand. Ew Gross.

This is a lie, because the rest of the list confirms employers want people to BS them. The person who lies the best gets the job.
- Then the lies pile on. It's much more easier to say the truth with a little bit of exaggeration.
 

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I suggest with the simple concept of competition and using words to sell one's self. I mean I'm ok with words but even though... if I was interviewing someone I'd just be nodding along to their "I am the best person for the job" spiel. Words are words, judgement is judgement.
 

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3. You don't show long-term potential: This is one of those instances in an interview where I'd always have to lie. I don't think I could work anywhere for more than 4-5 years or so.

6. You acted bored, cocky or disinterested: This may be the biggest one for me. I can't show enthusiasm to save my life. It's not that I don't want to. I'm a very laid back person. Keeping my cool is just my nature. I suppose I show my enthusiasm by being relaxed. Sadly, most people mistake being relaxed for being bored/disinterested.

10. You don't have enough experience: The dreaded paradox.
 

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It seems a lack of decent advertised job vacancies are cursing me right now. I'm all for applying and getting myself out there but it seems to be bone dry.
Finding a shit job that no one wants is pretty easy... more or less. But finding a job that actually can keep your spirits up enough to not think about death 24/7 seems impossible. I've never found a job like that... I think I can safety say it's ruining my experience of "life". If you can call it such. *jobless sigh*.
 

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Sweaty hands? Wipe them on your dress pants/skirt. Simple. I sure don't want to shake a sweaty damp and sticky hand. Ew Gross.
a little off-tangent, but i couldn't help myself. ever heard of palmar hyperhidrosis? affects 1-2% of the world's population. that's a lot of potential star employees you're prematurely shutting out.
 

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10. You don't have enough experience
Managers don't have as much time as they used to to train and mentor new employees. The more experience you have, the more likely you are to hit the ground running without a lot of hand-holding.

The best way to show that you know what you're doing is to give the employer concrete examples of your experience in a given job duty.
unless you don't have any experience in which case what do you do ? :dry:
 
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