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OMG IT'S DRIVING ME UP THE WALL.
I swear I had a brief lapse of insanity during class registration when I passed orgo1 and decided to take orgo2. I had mad motivation for orgo1...I can't seem to get it back this year. I'm afraid to go through with the current material as it seems to beat me down everytime I look at it, and once I figure something out, 2 more lessons are piled on top. I don't expect anybody here to know as it's a psychology forum (unless you do, then you should DEFINITELY message/contact/etc me), but is there any way to get past this road block efficiently?
 

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Iron Fist
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which part of it is giving you nightmares?
 

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OMG IT'S DRIVING ME UP THE WALL.
I swear I had a brief lapse of insanity during class registration when I passed orgo1 and decided to take orgo2. I had mad motivation for orgo1...I can't seem to get it back this year. I'm afraid to go through with the current material as it seems to beat me down everytime I look at it, and once I figure something out, 2 more lessons are piled on top. I don't expect anybody here to know as it's a psychology forum (unless you do, then you should DEFINITELY message/contact/etc me), but is there any way to get past this road block efficiently?
Oh my, thanks for bringing back some very frightening memories.

I barely survived 1, then crashed and burned badly in 2. I retook both the next year as summer courses (this was my only class but in a shorter window of time than the normal class.) I think making my life be organic chem for those two months was the key. It worked out really well. Plus the early stuff in organic chem1 will seem like cake once you've gotten a ways in like you have.

Just be careful studying in bed late at night. I fell asleep one night dreaming of chiral and achiral compounds floating around me and talking to me. Scary stuff.
 
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my strategies

i loved ochem. it was one of the funnest upper division classes i took.

on labs:
i thought about it like cooking. in order to get to an end product you have to do a set number of steps like a recipe. a lot of the labs separate two organic compounds by differances in propteries like solubility under cirtain condtitions. so when you do your lab write ups step one is to look for those differances. also don't worry too much about percent error or using the exact amount specified the point is to get the bigger picture which will really help you with your write ups.

on getting th reactions down solid:
you absolutely are gonna need this for synthesis later and if your teacher is like mine they are gonna throw so many curve balls at you (sex hormones for the birch beetle? wtf!). the way i learned them is that i first bunched them into groups by end product (all esters, all carboxilic acid formations etc.) and i got a sheet of paper that i folded in half long ways twice creating four columns. i would wirte the set of reactions i want to remember (like 5 or 6) on the left column fold it back so i can't see it, then try to write as many as i could recall on the next colum. i would do that over and over again until i had it down.

on spectroscopy:
no trick here man. i was horrible at that. towards the end i got the patterns and flash cards helped a lot same with nomenclature.

also:
acronyms help a lot especial with telling the differance between ortho-para directors and meta directors.

learn resonance structures if you haven't yet. they are the key to understanding mechanisms and predicting products.

websites:
Organic Chemistry help, practice tests and exams

OCHeM.com - Sample Exams

books:
Organic Chemistry II as a second language by david r. klein

ochem as a second language was great. it really put things in perspective. i highly recommend it!

sorry for the misspellings and good luck!
 

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Avoid being stressed out in a hurry to catch up. Steady pace til everything falls into place. Only move on when you're confident in the material you already know (adding on will be easier). It saves time to stay ahead of the lectures so that questions to your weak points were already formulated before hand. This could make the difference between leaving class feeling accomplished rather than confused.

easy on the caffeine :laughing:


edit: oh ya, draw a concept map as you go to see how everything branches together. Then make sure you know all the underlying math involved. This will help you own the exam.
 

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Also, always keep in mind the influence of eletric clouds, susceptible attack spots, (How the fuck you do write Pi) orbitals nearing electron rich atoms, and a couple more stuff I can't remember right now.

It all eventually boils down to understanding the nature of these compounds. You're not expecting to let that huge molecule bind in your tertiary amine unless you know who you're dealing with.

Also, down with spectrometry. Even though I liked the theory behind it, I really hated to correlate the graphs with the compounds.

Edit: I went to check if there's any difference between the organic chem II in my country, and apparently, there isn't. So some further tips.

Eletrophilic aromatic substitution: Keep in mind that aromatic compounds are rich in pi electrons, and therefore are highly nucleophilic. Therefore, they will be always the one to attack the other molecule, that normally has to undergo a process where it becomes some sort of cation or eletrophile. After this, all that happens is the realocation of the electron cloud and the removal of the Hidrogen atom.

Nucleophilic aromatic substitution: Now, the electron rich aromatic molecule must get eletrophilic. How does that happen? Put an halide (or a good leaving group) in the ring. It will pull the electrons for itself, making the ring more eletrophilic. After this, the nucleophile attacks the ring and there's the realocation of the electron cloud, resulting in the removal of the leaving group.

Ketones, Aldehydes and Carbonylated compounds: Seriously, that double bond with the Oxygen makes the carbon really vulnerable. Explore that. Also, explore the steric effects as best as you can, and know your nucleophil.

Enolates and enols are motherfuckers molecules that can't decide between being ketones or alcohols. Depending on the reaction environment, one may be favoured over another.

Amines aren't that hard. Learn their nucleophilic nature and you'll get along well.
 

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Leaves's advice is good.

Electronegativity was the concept that helped me the most. Oxygen is an electron hog!
 

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Introduction
I may learn different things in organic chemistry. Let's see, I learn parts of organic chemistry in [CHM 1022: Chemistry], full on organic chemistry in [CHM 2762: Design of Molecules and Macromolecules], organic chemistry in relation to cells in [CHM3730: Bioactive Chemistry].

Tips (May or may not be useful)
  • Know the difference between actual arrow and fish hook arrow. ---> and __\
  • Really understand the basic mechanisms instead of trying to memorize each steps. Once you familiar with the building blocks, mechanism questions will be easy.
  • Try to understand the mechanisms for spectroscopy. But if it take too much time, just memorize it.
  • Interpreting the spectra. Unfortunately you need to remember which functional groups lies within which region in spectra. Then it will simply be about cracking the puzzle.
  • Stearic hindrance and electron density.
  • If you really lost, use Wikipedia in Simple English. It should helps.
 
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