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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This sort of falls under the previous thread about INTPs and ADD but I decided to make a new one anyway to keep things more specific.

Like I mentioned in that last thread, I got diagnosed with ADHD predominately inattentive this summer. My family always jests that I need medicine so to spite them I literally made an appointment with a psychologist hoping to shut them up for good and who would have believed I actually was diagnosed. My attention scores were like 5-7th percentile. Horrible.

So anyway I started Adderall but I had side effects and had to drop it. The one thing I loved though was my increased threshold for stimulation. Eye contact didn't sap my vitality. I didn't go numb within 30 minutes of being at an amusement park or a BBQ. It was pretty interesting. I told my doctor I didn't feel like the medicine helped me with ADHD that much but that it helped me not get overstimulated and she said that's what ADHD predominately inattentive is. So I was like wow, okay, interesting...

But I think I am just low Se. Sensory reality burns me out and makes me numb real quick because of that. I don't "work with my hands" unless someone is holding a gun to my head. I hate it. Okay you see where I'm going with this?

Is this something unique to me or do all INTP's or even any INXX's have this same experience? How is your threshold for social and/or physical stimulation? I want some feedback to help me finalize some of my thinking.

***Possibly a better word is sensitivity. How sensitive are you to reality. And does it overwhelm your ability to analyze and process it. I'm not sure if that's a better word or a totally different discussion.
 

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I can get overstimulated, but not badly like you do. I have found that physical exertion does wonders to help me calm down and feel better if I get over-agitated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I like to go to the gym and exercise...that feels good...I hate like amusement parks or concerts though. That kind of exertion in physical world kills me. And it's interesting because most of the things "ADD" stop me from focusing on are things I hate and actively avoid anyway but with that sort of thing I do wish I coudl continue longer than I do without going numb and feeling like I am just like this intangible consciousness floating around feeling nothing. It's like being in a silent movie or something all of a sudden. Weird.
 

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There are days when I maintain but other days when I need to escape. When I’m alone for a while, my energy gradually increases until I’m energetic on the first day of socializing. If I choose to socialize on subsequent days, I progressively lose more and more mental stamina. After a while, I need to recuperate in solitude again.

Side Note:

I was diagnosed with ADD too. Most people understand this condition as ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) or ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder). Common symptoms of ADD/ADHD are short attention span, disorganization, distractibility, and poor impulse control.

People with ADD have trouble paying attention to routine and everyday activities. Despite our low tolerance for mundane procedures, a person with ADD pays attention better when highly stimulated. Anything new, enthralling, intriguing, frightening, or interesting helps the ADD person focus. There may even be an unhealthy desire to engage in dangerous activities, just to receive a proper stimulation. In response, these people might watch scary films, participate in adrenaline-pumping sports, or ride high-speed motorcycles.

Distractibility is another symptom of ADD. An ADD individual may focus on too many activities and become overly sensitive to the slightest shifts in the environment. According to Doctor Daniel Amen, neurologist and author, distractibility may affect a woman’s ability to have an orgasm. With proper treatment, sex for couples usually improves.

Another symptom of ADD is disorganization. One may be late for appointments, forget small details easily, and have messy houses or workspaces. People prone to ADD disorganization might attempt to self-medicate with stimulants such as cigarettes and coffee.

Another symptom for ADD-induced peoples is poor impulse control. These people act before they think, have trouble setting long-term goals, and think about the moment instead of the future. They often procrastinate with work and finish at the last minute.

SPECT scans for ADD patients:

SPECT (Single Positron Emission Computed Tomography) scans show that people with ADD have trouble when they concentrate. When the ADD brain is at rest, it appears normal, but when the ADD brain attempts to concentrate, there is decreased activity in the frontal lobes. Many stimulant-medications increase activity in the frontal lobes, which helps the person with ADD focus normally. The frontal lobes associate with attention, concentration, planning, judgment, and emotion.

SPECT scans also show excessive brain-wave activity (theta and alpha waves) in ADD patients compared to people without ADD. Alpha waves associate with meditation, creativity, or daydreaming. People exhibiting predominant alpha waves experience mild euphoria and are often highly intuitive. This is a state of relaxation and awareness. Monks, musicians, and artists have high alpha wave levels. Theta waves occur in the deeper modes of meditation, before one drifts to sleep, and are the second slowest brain-wave activity. People experiencing theta-waves have high surges of emotion or creativity.

Types of ADD/ADHD (as proposed by Doctor Amen):

1.) Classical ADD – Generic symptoms plus hyperactivity, restlessness, and impulsivity. SPECT scans show decreased activity in the prefrontal cortex, especially when one concentrates.

2.) Inattentive ADD – Low energy, low motivation, daydreaming, and internal preoccupation. SPECT scans show decreased activity in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum. This type is often diagnosed later in life and seems frequent in girls. People with type 2 ADD are seen as lazy, unmotivated and dumb, while the contrary is often true.

3.) Over focused ADD – Cognitive inflexibility, negative thoughts, behavioral preoccupation, grudge holding, argumentative, and a need to belong. SPECT scans show lower activity in the prefrontal cortex and increased anterior cingulate activity.

4.) Temporal Lobe ADD – Emotional outbursts, incomprehensiveness, anxiety, headaches, pessimism, memory problems, and a struggle with reading. SPECT scans show decreased activity in the prefrontal cortex and temporal lobes.

5.) Limbic ADD – Sadness, negativity, low energy, low self-esteem, irritability, reclusiveness, poor appetite, and difficulty sleeping. SPECT scans show decreased activity in the prefrontal cortex and increased activity in the limbic system.

6.) Ring of Fire ADD – Extreme moodiness, emotional outbursts, cognitive inflexibility, excessive talking, overly sensitive to sounds and lights. SPECT scans show over activity in various brain regions and stimulant medications adversely affect these patients.

Myths and Facts:


ADD and kids:


The brain and ADHD:

 
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