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I've been looking for a part-time job lately, and I automatically reject every single job I see on the basis that "it's just not quite right for me". All the jobs are cashier positions, marketing/sales , customer service, and call centre jobs (urgh...). (Yes, I may be being picky in my selection but if I am going to do a job, I might as well enjoy it.)

It seems as though the entire "job market" is extrovert-oriented which is quite unfair to the introverts.

Some people have suggested Warehouse jobs (just work quietly in the back) and Writing jobs. I write on a freelance basis but only as a volunteer (I'm building up my portfolio) and every ENTRY LEVEL warehouse job requires PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE (counter-intuitive, I know).

What would be the best part-time job for an INTJ or just introverts in general?
 

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I'm 18 and the vast majority of jobs around my area were all like that. Customer service of all sorts and fast food. No way I was going to do any of that. Suffice it to say I'm shipping out for the Navy in a few months.

I know there will still be a lot of talking to people but at least it will be mission oriented and not squabble and BS with a constant smile and pretend sunshine up my ass.
 

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During high school, I worked part-time at the local library. I spent most of the time shelving, but circulation or reference desk wasn't bad either. The nature of libraries doesn't encourage socializing beyond basic requests for information.

During college, I worked as an early-morning (pre-opening) custodian, once again at a library. The work wasn't the most exciting, but I was left to myself and could mentally review class material and plan papers or projects.
 

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I call the one I've managed to get Cardboard and Cardboard Accessories, which basically means I get up stupidly early in the morning to go unpack boxes and restock shelves at a craft store. Compared to most jobs in retail, this one requires the least amount of interaction. I'm given something to work on and expected to do it. That's it. My co-workers have their own tasks and no one is overly chatty. The store opens about an hour before my shift ends, so sometimes I have to interact with the clientele, but the sorts of people who shop there are generally easier to work with than what one would encounter at, say, Wal-Mart.

Given a choice, I'd be doing something else I actually like, but that's not a realistic option right now. However, if you'd prefer something more solitary, I recommend something like it. The downside is mostly that it's boring as shit, but dull > aggravating.
 

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I worked in a library also... and at a bookstore and in the church rectory (I counted up the collections) and also in sales at a camping goods store
 

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Definitely library or graveyard hours. I'd assume being a delivery driver of some sort would also fit the bill. I personally would go for an animal-related job.
 

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Go with your qualifications, beats looking for random jobs, more towards settling down.
best of luck
 

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I used to babysit solely at night so the kids would be asleep and the parents away partying, working a night shift, etc. Occasionally I'd have to watch a movie with them before they went to bed, but that was about as bad as it got, and I enjoy kids in small doses, so it was also pretty enjoyable.

I have tutored for pay as well, students much younger than me to students my age.
 

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I used to babysit solely at night so the kids would be asleep and the parents away partying, working a night shift, etc. Occasionally I'd have to watch a movie with them before they went to bed, but that was about as bad as it got, and I enjoy kids in small doses, so it was also pretty enjoyable.

I have tutored for pay as well, students much younger than me to students my age.
I'm curious about this, is it because it was your job to tutor students your age that you didn't find them annoying?
Do you discriminate between the ones you teach for money and the ones you teach for free?
obviousely, if it's too personal, disregard:wink:.
 

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I'm curious about this, is it because it was your job to tutor students your age that you didn't find them annoying?
Do you discriminate between the ones you teach for money and the ones you teach for free?
That was probably one reason, but the other was probably my school itself. I went to the top school in the State, so most of my classmates were quite serious about their grades and such. The main thing I taught people was how to study effectively. I myself have never really had to study because I soak up and retain information like a sponge, but other people aren't so lucky, so I tried to help by teaching them how to spot important info in the textbooks, how to make a clean and helpful study guide, and how to distinguish between important and unimportant information said from a teacher. I get very popular the few weeks before mid-terms and finals. :laughing:


The only people I tutor for free is my best friend and my younger brother. I would actually type up my best friend's study guides for her and give them to her (while simultaneously trying to teach her). Legally I couldn't/can't do that with other people while still charging because I could get sued for intellectual rights, get in trouble with teachers for 'cheating, etc., and in such a small school I could get caught pretty easily, and no way am I giving away study guides for free to just anyone. :laughing:
 

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I'm 18 and the vast majority of jobs around my area were all like that. Customer service of all sorts and fast food. No way I was going to do any of that. Suffice it to say I'm shipping out for the Navy in a few months.

I know there will still be a lot of talking to people but at least it will be mission oriented and not squabble and BS with a constant smile and pretend sunshine up my ass.
You are going to be sorely disappointed.
 

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I've been looking for a part-time job lately, and I automatically reject every single job I see on the basis that "it's just not quite right for me". All the jobs are cashier positions, marketing/sales , customer service, and call centre jobs (urgh...). (Yes, I may be being picky in my selection but if I am going to do a job, I might as well enjoy it.)

It seems as though the entire "job market" is extrovert-oriented which is quite unfair to the introverts.

Some people have suggested Warehouse jobs (just work quietly in the back) and Writing jobs. I write on a freelance basis but only as a volunteer (I'm building up my portfolio) and every ENTRY LEVEL warehouse job requires PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE (counter-intuitive, I know).

What would be the best part-time job for an INTJ or just introverts in general?
You have stated what you do not like, but you have omitted the most important datum, your skill set.

What do you bring to the table? That is, what skills and interest do you have, and the accent is on skills, not interests. I am an employer and have a lot of experience hiring people. Introvert/extrovert- I don't care! INTJ - I don't care! What can you do? I care!!

There is not a lot of demand for writers, at least not a lot of demand that results in wages. The vast majority are people are not working in jobs they like.
 

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Unfortunately most part-time jobs offered involve prolonged interaction with people or involve basic tasks that anyone can do, but I am not usually interested in, like clerical work. Cashiering for me was hell and working in an environment with chatty bobble-heads who complain when you don't smile at them, also contributed to the hellish nature of that place. My most recent job was as a receptionist for a home health care agency, which again tested my patience. The social environment of that place was the moral equivalent of a dog's den. I was completely out of my element most times. The only benefit for enduring these non-INTJ jobs was strictly practical: money.

Experiences like these help me to decipher which career path is more plausible for me and helped me to develop desired skill sets.
 

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That was probably one reason, but the other was probably my school itself. I went to the top school in the State, so most of my classmates were quite serious about their grades and such. The main thing I taught people was how to study effectively. I myself have never really had to study because I soak up and retain information like a sponge, but other people aren't so lucky, so I tried to help by teaching them how to spot important info in the textbooks, how to make a clean and helpful study guide, and how to distinguish between important and unimportant information said from a teacher. I get very popular the few weeks before mid-terms and finals. :laughing:


The only people I tutor for free is my best friend and my younger brother. I would actually type up my best friend's study guides for her and give them to her (while simultaneously trying to teach her). Legally I couldn't/can't do that with other people while still charging because I could get sued for intellectual rights, get in trouble with teachers for 'cheating, etc., and in such a small school I could get caught pretty easily, and no way am I giving away study guides for free to just anyone. :laughing:


(Sorry for reviving this thread)
Do you happen to have any free tips and tricks? :)
 
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