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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Is it better to study something that you find really interesting but are not good at? Or is it better to study something you're good at but find boring?

I'm in a bit of a dilemma right now, thinking of switching my degree from Joint Geology & Physics to just Physics. I feel like I have below average to average mathematical ability but can understand the theories in Physics really well. I'm really good at Geology but I'm bored/restless of Geology because of the amount of detail & practical stuff we have to do. Should I follow my passion and pursue Physics or stick with the degree I'm doing now?

Plus, I know if I stick with the degree I'm doing now, I'll still have time to play music (my other passion) but I'll still hate Geology and it will still put me in a bad mood but if I go down the Physics route, I won't have time for music which is also sad. This decision is so hard to make! :frustrating:

Career-wise, I'm thinking of doing research or science journalism either way.
 

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My suggestion is to study something that would be easier for you especially if you're going to make it your livelihood. That way, your future job would be less stressful and easier for you to accomplish while giving you more time and energy to spend on your passions.
 

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If I were you I would just minor in geology so you don't let those credits go to waste. As long as you don't think that decision will adversely affect your career. It's important to make time to do the things you love. I found that I would get depressed when I stopped playing guitar for extended periods of time which lead to burn out.
 

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How many, if any, course credits do you already have under your belt toward the geology half of your degree? If it is only a couple and you're truly not interested, then I'd say there's probably no real loss if you decide to switch to a purely physics degree. If you're at least halfway there, though, I'd just stick it out. Regardless of your career goals now, geophysicists are always in demand in the oil and gas industry and it can be helpful to have that kind of option to fall back on, should you need to.
 

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Is it better to study something that you find really interesting but are not good at? Or is it better to study something you're good at but find boring?

I'm in a bit of a dilemma right now, thinking of switching my degree from Joint Geology & Physics to just Physics. I feel like I have below average to average mathematical ability but can understand the theories in Physics really well. I'm really good at Geology but I'm bored/restless of Geology because of the amount of detail & practical stuff we have to do. Should I follow my passion and pursue Physics or stick with the degree I'm doing now?

Plus, I know if I stick with the degree I'm doing now, I'll still have time to play music (my other passion) but I'll still hate Geology and it will still put me in a bad mood but if I go down the Physics route, I won't have time for music which is also sad. This decision is so hard to make! :frustrating:

Career-wise, I'm thinking of doing research or science journalism either way.

Well, that's quite a difficult question to answer. If you switch to physics, you will have to be good at math. Are you average at it bc you lack knowledge or bc you do not understand it or bc you have trouble applying it corectly? What are your plans for the future if pursuing physics?

I will always choose to do what both challenges me and what comes natural to me so that I can fall back on routine/experience as well as take on challenges (that way you have time to please your Ne and keep your Ti-Si happy as well). Honestly, I wouldn't know what to choose if I were in your shoes. Yes routine is boring but it is also good to please that sense of security. But without passion, challenge, creativity, why would you do what you do... :-/
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
How many, if any, course credits do you already have under your belt toward the geology half of your degree? If it is only a couple and you're truly not interested, then I'd say there's probably no real loss if you decide to switch to a purely physics degree. If you're at least halfway there, though, I'd just stick it out. Regardless of your career goals now, geophysicists are always in demand in the oil and gas industry and it can be helpful to have that kind of option to fall back on, should you need to.
I'm just about to finish my first year. In the UK, university lasts for four years. Yeah, I agree with the oil and gas industry point but even before going into university, I knew that I would never go into that industry. It's just not me at all, I'd rather be a waitress and have to constantly talk to people than do that. I have 2 credits towards Geology, 3 for Physics and 1 for Maths. I failed 2 of the maths courses last term by a few marks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Well, that's quite a difficult question to answer. If you switch to physics, you will have to be good at math. Are you average at it bc you lack knowledge or bc you do not understand it or bc you have trouble applying it corectly? What are your plans for the future if pursuing physics?

I will always choose to do what both challenges me and what comes natural to me so that I can fall back on routine/experience as well as take on challenges (that way you have time to please your Ne and keep your Ti-Si happy as well). Honestly, I wouldn't know what to choose if I were in your shoes. Yes routine is boring but it is also good to please that sense of security. But without passion, challenge, creativity, why would you do what you do... :-/
I'm good when maths gets incorporated in Physics (applied maths maybe?) but really bad at Algebra, Geometry and Trig on its own but Calculus is fine. I'm thinking of doing Science Journalism because I'd like to write to get the information out to an audience. Research in Astronomy, I have thought about but don't know if I will have the mathematical ability to go that far as to get a PhD. They're both difficult fields to get into which is probably not the best idea but I just can't find any other job that's as fascinating as those :( I chose Geology because I love travelling and wanted to become a seismology researcher (there you go, difficult field to enter again!) since a few years ago so that I could devise a way to make predicting earthquakes more accurate and so less people will lose their lives. But I don't know if that's the right path anymore since I dislike geology so much.
 

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Don't let your worries hold you back. I am sure you're really bright and you are more than capable of learning the math needed. It's just a matter of finding the best way to learn and finding the time to learn.
 

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From personal experience I would recommend staying with what you have specifically because you don't like it. I am going to go out on a limb and say that the differentiation between these degress isn't going to impact your career very much. As such, pick the more annoying one and learn to buckle down and develop maturity. It has helped me more than anything else I have ever done.
 

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How flexible is your straight physics course? Would you in second and third year be able to avoid some of the physics you don't like in favour of physics you do? Or is it pretty much all core?

Research in Astronomy, I have thought about but don't know if I will have the mathematical ability to go that far as to get a PhD.
Would not recommend. Astrophysics is very mathsy. Particularly a no-go if you don't like geometry and trig.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
How flexible is your straight physics course? Would you in second and third year be able to avoid some of the physics you don't like in favour of physics you do? Or is it pretty much all core?



Would not recommend. Astrophysics is very mathsy. Particularly a no-go if you don't like geometry and trig.
I only need to take 1 pure maths credit in second year and then after that I don't need to take any pure maths credits. It's pretty much all core Physics.
 

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Is it better to study something that you find really interesting but are not good at? Or is it better to study something you're good at but find boring?

I'm in a bit of a dilemma right now, thinking of switching my degree from Joint Geology & Physics to just Physics. I feel like I have below average to average mathematical ability but can understand the theories in Physics really well. I'm really good at Geology but I'm bored/restless of Geology because of the amount of detail & practical stuff we have to do. Should I follow my passion and pursue Physics or stick with the degree I'm doing now?

Plus, I know if I stick with the degree I'm doing now, I'll still have time to play music (my other passion) but I'll still hate Geology and it will still put me in a bad mood but if I go down the Physics route, I won't have time for music which is also sad. This decision is so hard to make! :frustrating:

Career-wise, I'm thinking of doing research or science journalism either way.
My personal advice: just take the classes you want to take that sound interesting. whether it's geology physics or just physics who cares. Just a title. Also, you need to know what you like and why you like it, the thing you like the most. and the idea is with time, what it is that you like is abstract enough to become a part of everything you do. I mean everything. This is important because it means your rationale will be both optimistic and corroborated by reality in the moment of the task performed. It's undeniable. The task itself becomes transformative because it was impossible to know of it.

No but seriously, what you like matters... for you to continue existing, and others to as well. Doing what you like is difficult for an INTP to find as having any merit. So if it's seen as extremely worthy of your attention, you won't get dragged down in so many of the burn out slumps.

As for ability, psshhh everything is easy for everyone if they know how to find what they like in what they do.
 

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I'm good when maths gets incorporated in Physics (applied maths maybe?) but really bad at Algebra, Geometry and Trig on its own but Calculus is fine.
Oh, I see. So you don't have a problem when they ask you to calculate speed, acceleration or position using a formula but when they ask you to do the same but for an unknown variable you get confused? Maybe you could make up your own story while solving math problems? Math is basically the same thing but without a specific meaning (except for calculous where you use it to calculate volumes, length, direction etc. but you are good at that...).


I'm thinking of doing Science Journalism because I'd like to write to get the information out to an audience. Research in Astronomy, I have thought about but don't know if I will have the mathematical ability to go that far as to get a PhD. They're both difficult fields to get into which is probably not the best idea but I just can't find any other job that's as fascinating as those :( I chose Geology because I love travelling and wanted to become a seismology researcher (there you go, difficult field to enter again!) since a few years ago so that I could devise a way to make predicting earthquakes more accurate and so less people will lose their lives. But I don't know if that's the right path anymore since I dislike geology so much.
I pretty much get the same vibe from all of those things: you want to do research or keep up with current research. I'm pretty sure that all of those options will be difficult but that isn't necessarily a problem, right? Better to aim high and to fail every now and then than to aim low and not be challenged. Besides you are only starting out. Maybe geology will become more interesting the next year or you will get better at math... Maybe you should look at the material for next year and determine what you want to do based upon that information.
 
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