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In any case it takes a fair amount of self-important conceit to cause this effect. So although BPD, paranoia, narcissism, depression, worthlessness, loss, and OCD could all cause this, the root usually stems from some amount of conceit, an exaggerated sense of self-importance.
 
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Have you ever encountered such people in your life? They will constantly overreact to everything you do, and you constantly find yourself having to walk on eggshells around them. They will often read too deeply into your actions, and they will often assume that you are out to get them, and then they start to get pissed off at you, and then instead of telling you that they are mad at you, they will start to do a bunch of things to you just to piss you off. They tend to have very huge reaction to little incidents, and you constantly find yourself walking on eggshells around them because you fear that you might trigger them.

Has anyone here ever dealt with these kind of people in your life before? What causes them to act this way?
Yes all the time but I got used to it already.

I hope you're fine @Schizoid :(
I miss your curious genius mind, I'll be here when you come back.
 
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EvilShoutyRudolph
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I find that the opposite type of person is infinitely more annoying. People who will do whatever they want and act like nothing they do affects anybody else. Basically psychopaths. Better to be annoying than a psychopath. Whenever you complain about a real issue people will "call bs" on you as if their opinion of what matters dictates all other people. To me it's very simple, you broke my rule. Period. There's no negotiation. There is no twisting it around.
I know this is unrelated, but I used to have a very weird obsession with studying conduct disorder and aspd. I remember spending all my time learning about these disorders, and studied them like crazy. That's it....
 

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Plague Doctor
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For anyone wondering the clinical diagnosis of someone who overreacts in the way that has been described, it's most likely a Cluster B personality disorder:

Antisocial Personality Disorder
Borderline Personality Disorder
Histrionic Personality Disorder
Narcissistic Personality Disorder

- - - - - - - - - -

People who have issues with emotions, like the typical under-developed NT (though it could be any personality type) can sometimes be very uncomfortable around other people with healthy expression of emotions, such as, speaking up when people are upsetting them, expressing joy or happiness, or expressing sadness or pain. I have found in people who don't like display of emotion, they sometimes label people who are healthy as "over-emotional". I saw that a lot when I was working in a private practice is why I mention it.

And then, there are people who are appear over emotional for other reasons like an acute anxiety disorder, a death in the family, thyroid problems, neurological damage, etc... These people have medical issues which will resolve the symptom.

The assumption that Feeling types are overly emotional is something I have found a little funny. Feeling types are geniuses in feelings. They can sit with uncomfortable feelings for long periods of time and they have a lot of practice handling loads of emotions. While I understand that Fi/Fe is more than just emotions, they can process emotions like ninjas.

However, personality disorder and other medical issues can affect every personality type so, there's that, too.
 

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I have had relationships with two people who fit this description. The first had NPD (narcissistic personality disorder), and the second bipolar I. It is really hard to feel like you can't be honest or say what you are thinking (or ask someone to clean the dishes!) in a relationship.

In my case, the difference between the two is the first one had no empathy or regret at all unless he saw that his actions would negatively affect him. He would then apologize and try to fix it until he saw that wasn't going to work and then would say "I didn't care anyway." The second one (my partner now) has bipolar and does those things when he is off meds and depressed or hypo-manic. However, he is truly apologetic afterwards and working towards getting better. The NPD partner seemed to always have ultra control of everything and my current partner it looks like everything is spinning out of control.

I am not an expert, but personally I think traits like this are not suggestive of personality type, but rather of a pathology. They can be addressed and corrected.
 

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A few factors I can think of are birth order (sometimes competition between siblings can bring out the worst in people), other factors we learned about from psychology (psychosocial stages of development during poddy training could be a factor). Diet on brain development in early childhood. Parental influence.

I think a person's environment has a lot to do with it. Ever been around different families? You'll notice how different families have different (guess you can call it personalities)? There are some families that are warm, and some families that are very cold and seem very rigid and restrictive. This rigidity likely causes people to become petty, short-sighted, narrow-minded, and extremely overreacting and sensitive over the smallest details (even worse than a drama series from Days of Our Lives...).

The propensity to be controlling likely causes to people to become overly sensitive and reactive given their environmental conditions in that they don't have healthy ways of expressing thoughts and emotions that encourage dialogue. It's an unhealthy pattern of behavior based on fulfilling extrinsic needs in order to feel intrinsically satisfied (feeling to need to measure oneself with others' expectations in order to feel worthy).
 

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How about people who overreact to something you did not react to, the way they wish you did? Like to saying a joke.

It's an unhealthy pattern of behavior based on fulfilling extrinsic needs in order to feel intrinsically satisfied (feeling to need to measure oneself with others' expectations in order to feel worthy).
Very nicely said. I've noticed that quite a lot irl around here. I've been rather careful with my selection of friends but I still keep hearing stories all the time about people getting over-triggered or being excessively politically correct. Worse yet, some try to look tough but as you get to know them they succumb to "I'm a special snowflake" mentality eventually, such as blaming their laziness or failing school on how much of a victim they are in their own society and suffering from all sorts of depressive, bipolar episodes etc., despite having their extrinsic needs MORE than met (enough money to buy them all equipment needed for leisure and work; from archery to gaming laptops, gravel bikes and European tours), especially prevalent in those younger than 22. It is a bizarre combination of ego with what gets called "sensibility", but I would call it lack of genuine exposure to other cultures/ways of thinking or the islander mentality. Families are too cold perhaps, too formal, career is placed above...

I think I mostly either choose to want to walk on eggshells to protect somebody I think I can protect, or if forced, then I will not. I won't tolerate a shitty or demeaning behavior/jokes from someone because they think they deserve it for having a "health issue"; that's just selfish and others may be dealing with other difficult life situations but they just don't yell it out loud. The real rewards of socializing come when you can lose yourself in the "group" and be accepted without forcefully demanding it...
 

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^I generally find that walking on eggshells and dealing with the patterns of micro-aggression and toxicity are certainly not worth the time nor effort to engage in.

Group-think enables further escalation of abuse to continue.

And I agree- it’s often seen IRL. And I don’t think it’s human nature as I’ve been around a good amount of people who aren’t like this.

Thankfully.
 

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As an update, my INTP partner who is not usually like this (the "walking on eggshell personality") is doing better. He is working on treating his BPD and I and other friends are noticing he is coming back to not being reactive or difficult to talk to. It is like before when he wasn't hypomanic or manic.

So, it is interesting how differing (IMO) a personality can be vs. a pathology that is overlaid upon a personality. His INTP personality is very gentle and laid back and usually avoids confrontation and even takes a lot of time to think through conversations in his head and come up with a good response, vs. when his BPD symptoms are "running rampant" he is angry and can have snap attacks and almost jump the gun and try to anticipate in a negative way what he thinks you mean, and make you the bad guy. Removing that impetus brings him back to who he really is without the disorder.
 

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Have you ever encountered such people in your life? They will constantly overreact to everything you do, and you constantly find yourself having to walk on eggshells around them. They will often read too deeply into your actions, and they will often assume that you are out to get them, and then they start to get pissed off at you, and then instead of telling you that they are mad at you, they will start to do a bunch of things to you just to piss you off. They tend to have very huge reaction to little incidents, and you constantly find yourself walking on eggshells around them because you fear that you might trigger them.

Has anyone here ever dealt with these kind of people in your life before? What causes them to act this way?
So, this is over-expressed anger, hair-triggered. Anger is an honest emotion, so, often sadly, you can mostly trust what they say when they are mad as accurate on how they genuinely feel.

The trouble is that anger is misled often enough by fear or desire. Whereas most fear and desire types are demure or sensitive to image and impression, anger types are shameless, in general. The result is that an anger type who lets fear or desire cloud or overwhelm their anger can be a real pain in the butt to deal with.

Anger is high presence. It gets big and its gets loud and it does so very fast, faster than thought. The body is quicker than the mind, in general.

Unfortunately anger must be dealt with. If you let it reign it will only get louder faster the next time. And anger only respects anger. That means you must directly confront the anger and not back down. The good thing about anger is that when and if you do make this confrontation, you do not have to last too long. You just have to fight things back to balance. This is effectively a presence attack.

Anger is very often all bark and no bite. But you have to watch out for the warning signs of a truly immoral anger, one that will go on and do actual damage. Even in such a case the meeting anger with anger is still the fastest means to a balanced approach. One of the best, yet rude ways to deal with anger is to dare it to go on. This must be done carefully. You loudly state your position and indicate contempt for the angry one. You hold your ground and do not retreat, as physical moves away are deemed cowardice and will spur on the anger display. Do not make direct threats like eye contact or physical touch. Make instead indirect dismissals with sound argument and loudly. Score as many social points as you can, but try to do it without being rude. If you can maintain composure anger types eventually look like buffoons, bulls in the China shop. Calmly point out that the loudness of an argument or its persistent push, do not make it correct.

You have to be aware of your audience. If you speak against a left wing woke concept to a group of artists and left oriented types or against discipline and order to right winger anger monkeys, you are not going to get a good response. Even if you stymie the display, there is no point.

Anger ADMIRES balance. Anger ADMIRES those who will fight no matter what. It disrespects those who run away and those who want to look good no matter the costs (and rightly so). If your position is unworthy for real, its hard to beat someone's anger about it.

Anyway, good luck!
 
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