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Discussion Starter #1
This is my interpretation. It's mostly based on Irvin Yalom's theory: Existential Therapy Homepage


Death & Human Limitation
Everyone will die. We can only do so much in life. Yet by conquering our fear of death, we gain the ability to strive freely towards our goals.

Freedom & Responsibility
Everyone can make choices at all times. By realizing this, we gain the ability to take responsibility for our lives and actions.

Isolation & Connectedness
Within their heads, everyone is alone. Understanding this, we can feel genuine compassion and connection towards every living being.

Meaning & Meaninglessness
By conquering our fears and taking responsibility for our actions, we gain the capability to act in a meaningful manner. By universal compassion brought on by isolation, we can make our goal the well-being of all life.
 

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Those sound difficult coming to terms with. Moreso depending on the sort of person you are. Like the extremes of death and limitation. With limitation including how much you can take before being engorged. But yeah, they're all something to think about.
 

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First, not everyone is a candidate for existential psychotherapy because they may lack insight or the inability (be it deliberate or otherwise) to even have insight or may have a psychiatric disorder that overrides any notion of these 'existential' givens.
Second, these four existential 'givens' are, indeed, true, but I feel must become more practical and realistic for others if they're to be taken seriously (which I feel they should!). For example, I don't believe for a second that we "...can feel genuine compassion and connection towards every living being." We can become slightly more compassionate and connected, however.
Third, Irvin Yalom's Existential Psychotherapy is one of the finest books ever written, and has influenced my life greatly.
Fourth, I can't help it...your avatar is hot.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
First, not everyone is a candidate for existential psychotherapy because they may lack insight or the inability (be it deliberate or otherwise) to even have insight or may have a psychiatric disorder that overrides any notion of these 'existential' givens.
Perhaps everyone is. It depends a lot on the capability therapist, how she will proceed with different people :happy:


Second, these four existential 'givens' are, indeed, true, but I feel must become more practical and realistic for others if they're to be taken seriously (which I feel they should!). For example, I don't believe for a second that we "...can feel genuine compassion and connection towards every living being." We can become slightly more compassionate and connected, however.
Why don't you believe that ?


Third, Irvin Yalom's Existential Psychotherapy is one of the finest books ever written, and has influenced my life greatly.
I'm glad it has worked so well for you :happy:

I've been meaning to get it as well, but got van Deurzen's "Everyday Mysteries - Handbook for Existential Psychotherapy" first.
Now if I'd only have time to read it! :laughing:


Fourth, I can't help it...your avatar is hot.
Your happiness is my happiness :happy:
 

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I'm not sure how universal they are but they do seem like relevant issues to peoples lives, I think it can give room for people to create their own meaning on their journey through such issues.
But such therapy I think lacks practicality in costs since its so long term, a lot of Yalom's clients see him for years before things come to a conclusion and I can't imagine any psychotherapy being cheap which makes me wonder how all these people afforded his treatment XD
 
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