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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've noticed that it is mostly intuitives that are into philosophy. However, I occasionally meet some Se users (SP's) that are into philosophy as well. What on earth would make an Intuitive interested in philosophy. Also, how could philosophy be taught to someone with a strong Si function, which would make someone have very little imagination? How does this work?
 
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Every human eventually come to struggle with fundamental questions - life, death, existence, meaning, significance, love etc. Having a vivid imagination would certainly aid you as you look for answers to your philosophical questions, but they are questions that we all have. So everyone is a philosopher of sort, and it's in everyone's interest to have a stance on life.

Si means to take in information and then compare it to older information. So when something doesn't fit the pattern anymore, it raises the question "how did this happen?". Sometimes you encounter something new so that you can't compare it to old data. There are many ways to trigger thought!

It's all about how you present it. That's how you make people interested, that's how you teach. If by argument Si's aren't into philosophy then that's about presentation, IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Every human eventually come to struggle with fundamental questions - life, death, existence, meaning, significance, love etc. Having a vivid imagination would certainly aid you as you look for answers to your philosophical questions, but they are questions that we all have. So everyone is a philosopher of sort, and it's in everyone's interest to have a stance on life.

Si means to take in information and then compare it to older information. So when something doesn't fit the pattern anymore, it raises the question "how did this happen?". Sometimes you encounter something new so that you can't compare it to old data. There are many ways to trigger thought!

It's all about how you present it. That's how you make people interested, that's how you teach. If by argument Si's aren't into philosophy then that's about presentation, IMO.
Why then is it, that I find that mostly intuitives are into philosophy?
 

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Why then is it, that I find that mostly intuitives are into philosophy?
You are right, or I think so also, but that doesn't mean philosophy isn't important to sensors. Could you name a person with no beliefs? It's gonna get more uhm visible as someone dies. Suddenly everyone gets all existentialistic.
I repeat, everyone has a need to understand things around them. Everyone questions life and death but maybe S's take life more how it comes and is presented to them. Let's say someone (S) has the belief "we live, we die - everything in between is a struggle but life is here and now, not much else is worth thinking deep thoughts about." Now that is a philosophy also, even though you may not perceive it that way. But then that's all in your head.

Such a person isn't going to be very interested in philosophy as a subject in school, because he already knows what he wanna know. That doesn't mean that what he believes in isn't important to him.

Si is a gathering function, anyways. Not for expressing! We are fine with gathering wisdom, no need to have your own original thoughts:tongue::cool:
 

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Well, as an ISTJ I care little for philosophy if it isn't practical. I might be interested in learning the basic facts about different religions and philosophical schools of thought, but philosophy stops there for me. You can't ever find an answer to a question like "What's the meaning of life?", so I don't see that I can gain that much by reading philosophical works by others.

My philosophy is that I just accept my religion's views about things. but then religion is still mostly practical for me (governing how I act, based on what the Bible says to do/not do).

I'm not really that deep in the least.
 

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I think about this sort of thing all the time when I am alone. I personally don't participate much in philosophical discussions because it is hard for me to articulate those thoughts in speech and paper.
 

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I'm quite interested in philosophy but only to the point where it actually has a practical meaning or impact on anything. I don't see the point in thinking about something that makes no difference. If you want me to pay attention, let me see how it's relevant to real physical things like me me me or other people.
 

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I'm taking a philosophy class this summer and even though I was kind of irked out about it due to what I read on here, I actually find it extremely interesting. While what I've learned so far isn't directly applicable in the sense that I can go out and do something with it immediately, it has changed the way I look at objects and life in general and because of that I find it to be pretty valuable.

To answer your question, it's probably perceived as a subject for intuitors because they apparently like things that are "abstract" and like to "question things" and not accept anything at "face value." IMO, those stereotypes are bullshit and part of the reason why sensors get a bad rap around here.
 

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philosophy is based on principles and theories/rules/laws- not imagination. Si users can understand it perfectly well, they may not always be interested in it because it usually has no practical value.
 

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Philosophy is one of many tools used to understand life. Because of it's highly theoretical nature, it's probably predominantly an interest of Ti and Ni users, leaving it mostly used by NT's and STP's. I've interacted with as many NF's who despised it, as I have sensors of any sort. Personally, I love philosophy, but even I have my limits. I have an INTP friend, who spent eight years in college to attain his doctorates in it, only to go into an unrelated field. Frankly, there's no way in Hell, that I would invest that amount of time and money into studying what amounts to a hobby, with absolutely no returns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You're an intuitive. You should, ostensibly, be able to figure this out on your own.

PS - no, I'm not kidding, nor being a jerk.
I'm taking a philosophy class this summer and even though I was kind of irked out about it due to what I read on here, I actually find it extremely interesting. While what I've learned so far isn't directly applicable in the sense that I can go out and do something with it immediately, it has changed the way I look at objects and life in general and because of that I find it to be pretty valuable.

To answer your question, it's probably perceived as a subject for intuitors because they apparently like things that are "abstract" and like to "question things" and not accept anything at "face value." IMO, those stereotypes are bullshit and part of the reason why sensors get a bad rap around here.
Yeah, that's pretty much what conclusion that I came to; intuitives like philosophy because it is a very abstract subject.
 

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Also, how could philosophy be taught to someone with a strong Si function, which would make someone have very little imagination? How does this work?
*Double Face Palm* "very little imagination"-- if you only knew.

It is taught like anything else...scaffolding. Relate it to something that they have had experience with in the past and go from there.

Lose the negative stereotypes and you'll be amazed at what you might see.:dry:
 
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