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I thought I was INFJ, now I'm not so sure. There are many reasons for this, 1. I always type as INFJ but on a recent test came out INFP. 2. I heard that other types can often be mistyped as INFJ 3. No matter how much I look into the cognotive functions I can't distinguish between them. I can work out which fit me and which don't I often find that I am a bit of both.

So I am using this rather useful list of questions found in Revy2Hand's thread. I would love to know based on my answers to the below questions and also my comments on this forum (should you have the time to go reading them) what type you think I am? Thanks!

1. When working on a project where do you place your emphasis? the process of putting it together? or the final product? (Do you experiment with your perspectives to create ideas? )
A: I spend a lot of time planning the project making sure that every detail is correct. For example I recently had an idea for a story and I felt the need to plan in detail everything about the story before I started writing it. I got to the point where I realised that my story was never going to get written if I get procrastinating in this way.

2. Are you a realist? Are you more of a no nonsense type of person? (I find these people like to call bullshit on everything)
A: I tend to take things and people as they are. Sometimes I might wonder inside my head if this person is exaggerating, but I never voice this. My family sometimes think I come across as naïve because I give people the benefit of the doubt. Even if I think they might be lying or talking bull I will still go along with it until it is confirmed to me that they are lying.

3. Would you say you make decisions quickly? or do you take a while coming to a conclusion, because you hope you're not missing some vital information that will change your mind?
A: I take my time. Even though sometimes I just want to get what ever it is I’m doing finished I still want to make sure what I’m doing or deciding is correct. Or if I am invited out somewhere I need time to think about whether I really want to go or not.

4. Do you ever experience nostalgia? For instance being able to completely remember a mood of a past experience/time?
A: Yes! I will often think about something that happened in my past, something I may regret or something I am fond of. I remember when I was little my mum used to give me chocolate milk because I hated the taste of normal milk. I can still remember feeling and taste of drinking warm chocolate milk from a bottle.

5. Are you of the rebellious sort? The sort who rebels for no reason other than to rebel against authority?
A: Definitely not! I have always been and will always be a ‘goody two shows’. My teachers loved me because I was no trouble, I just sat there quietly getting on with my work. The onyl negative I got was that I didn't contribute in group discussions enough. I never got into trouble with my mum. It was easier for me to rebel against my brother though and we would often argue, but that’s about it.

6. When watching a film and critiquing it? Do you critique it based on details in the film, for instance on how you thought a certain portion of it was un-realistic (or something along those lines) or based on the idea or point they were trying to get across/how well they got it across? (It can be a combination of both sometimes too) (an example would be for example, critiquing Passion of the Christ, do you think the movies retarded because no one can live as long as he did with that much blood loss, or because of the fundamental errors the movie makes when trying to make its point, and the way it tries to connect the audience to that point?)
A: Well, after watching the latest Indian Jones movie I was pretty disappointed! The ending sucked, I was really drawn in and enjoying it until it got all Scifi. That complete through me off! I don’t generally notice mistakes such as someone’s age, or problems with timing etc. I get too engrossed with the characters to notice such things. I tend to just watch the movie not pick at details unless they are blatantly obvious and unrealistic.

I like to be drawn into the story. I will most likely talk about how the film made me feel afterwards. Like with Lost series everyone wanted to know what the story meant and I got caught up in that and looked into people's interpreations, however, I was actually quite happy with the ending (it made me cry) and decided there was no point finding meaning in it because it was about the people and their relationships and that's all that mattered in the end.

7. When debating with others, do you ever get the feeling or state for that matter, that you can see where your opponent is coming from? For instance I have gotten into arguments over things I honestly don't believe (or could care less if it were true), but it all started when someone would tell me about a certain topic and how this certain stance is stupid.Then I would say well, I can see why they'd think that or how it could be possible, then they'd start arguing with me as if I had a stake in it.... Do you feel you do anything like that?
A: I do this a lot. For example a friend might disagree with someone and I may agree with my friend, but then I will say how I can see why this person thinks this way. I find that I am often able to justify other people’s opinions even if they aren’t my own.

8. Do you notice symbols in the world, do you ever try and wrap the symbol back to an idea that you believe?]
A: I never really understand this…I keep seeing it on the list for intuitions and I can’t answer yes or know because I have no clue if I notice symbols or not. What is meant by symbols in the world?

9. Are you hurt by criticisms? Do you get personally offended when people try and criticize you? or are you thick skinned?
A: Yes…depends on my mood that day and I am a lot better than I was. In the past when I have received criticism on something personal like a piece of art work I would have to hold back the tears even though I know that the person is not being mean, they are trying to help me.

10. Say for example your learning about cameras in school, would you be more inclined to go home right away and read a whole shit load on cameras so you feel confident in your knowledge of cameras? or would you feel perfectly comfortable when the teacher calls on people to come try it out, to just hop up there and start using it?

A: I don’t usually read instruction manuals unless I am building furniture, so in this case I would just have a go with the camera and learn as I go along. I know that there will be a limit on how much I can learn from ‘doing’, for example I have a new phone and I have only looked at the manual once. I know that if I do read it I will probably find out that my phone can do something really cool and I am missing out on this by not reading the manual!

11. When you are out do you worry about how people will interpret any action you take? (sort of in a seinfeld sort of way, where they over analyze actions people make, trying to find their true motivation) Do you feel a sort of pressure from this?

A: I don’t like people making judgements about me before getting to know me. So in a way yes I suppose I do worry that people will be making assumptions by the way I behave or the way I dress.

12. In a classroom setting do you ever find yourself helping other people out with projects or homework when you see their struggling? Do you do this to make yourself feel more comfortable?
A: Yes I would say I do this. I have notice myself watching people without them realising and if I notice them struggling I will subtly try to help them. For example by moving my notepad so that it faces more towards them in order for them to be able to glance at it. I do this in a subtle way that even they don’t realise that I am doing it for them. I just like to help people, so I do tend to set things up to make life easier for other people.

13. Do you find yourself ranting to your friends about how a certain something could have been done way easier? Or how someone went about doing something (anything like a project,work,etc.) was really stupid and you could have done it way better and in a more simple fashion?
A: Not really…I notice my brother does this a lot. I tend to just go with the flow rather than criticise what other people are doing.

14. how does your average day go in general,
A: I’ve just started University and right now no day is the same. I will pick one of them though:
Monday: Wake up 7am so that I have time to wash my hair and get ready. Have breakfast. Find that I have about 30 minutes before I need to leave the house. Decided to pop online to check my emails just incase there has been a change to lesson times. 30 minutes go by very quickly and I suddenly realise I have 5 minutes to put some socks on, shoes on and brush my teeth and shove everything into my bag.
I leave the house at 8.45 ish and it take me 10-15 minutes to walk to my lecture. I arrive there pretty much on the dot for 9am start.
My lecture finishes at 11.45 and I think shall I go back home for lunch? My next lecture doesn’t start until 1.30pm. I decide to go back home for lunch.
Again I muck around on the computer and again find that I have to leave in a hurry.
Arrive at my lecture just on time.
Come back home at 3.15 and spend the rest of the afternoon on the computer on various Internet sites all the while thinking I should be writing up my notes from my classes.
Have dinner at whatever time takes my fancy (6pm ish) then go to bed sometime between 10-12 pm.

15. what things do you value the most,
A: Family, Life, Art, Literature, Nature, Affection, Freedom, Peace, Harmony, Creativity, Happiness, Privacy, Honesty, Being helpful, Caring, Integrity, Reputation

16. what things regularly bug you,
A: When someone doesn’t do something you as them to do, like cleaning because they say “I’ll do it late” when you want it done now.
Someone who is bossy and wants to take control of everything.
Not having time to reflect.
People who can’t see from other people’s perspective.
Not being right.
Seeing someone do something stupid that I am helpless to change.
People who lack common sense.
People who interrupt you mid conversation or try to complete your sentence.
People who, when I’m talking, look for clues that enables them to talk more about themselves.
When things don’t go the way I expected.

17. what do you value most in other people and what qualities do you find most repulsive in others,
A: Patient, Polite, Caring, Considerate, Enthusiastic, Upbeat, Playful, Humorous, Knowledgeable, Feeling, Confident.

Repulsive – Arrogant, bossy, lazy, selfish, loud, demanding, inconsiderate of other peoples feelings, tactless, cruel, bully, spiteful, dismissive, overdramatic.

18. how do you evaluate people in general,
A: How they treat me and how they treat others. If they act a certain way it may remind me of someone else I know who behaves in a similar way and so this will either make me want to become friends with the person or if I had a bad experience I might become more cautious. However I usually find that I don’t want to upset anyone by giving the cold shoulder so even people I am cautious about I will still come across warm and friendly.

19. how do you arrive at your decisions,
A: I usually discuss them with my brother…I tend to think out loud for a while bouncing my ideas off my brother (who usually doesn’t give much feedback) until I eventually come to a decision.

20. what factors are you most likely to pay attention to when deciding on things.

A: How it makes me feel.
I think about whether I have done something similar in the past. If I have done something similar in the past I consider whether I enjoyed it or not.
If it’s a place I’m going to I think about how I’m going to get there, what time etc.
Who else will be there.

21. Any peculiarities that you have noticed about your personality?
A: From when I was very young to around the age of 18 I was always very shy, reserved, quiet and afraid to say what I was thinking and afraid to make a fool out of myself. I am now 22 and I feel much more enthusiastic about things, much more confident. I am finding that in my lectures I actually have something to contribute and I’m not afraid to do speak out in front of the class.

I have yet to find more than one other person who shares the same taste in music and movies as me…I have an appreciation for the unique and unusual, the weird and wonderful. I love to hear new sounds not the same generic stuff in the charts. My tastes are very eclectic. The same with movies, I am the odd one out in my family. none of them like the kinds of movies I do.

22. Anything that makes you stand out from other people that you know?

A: My auburn hair! My colleague at my old job used to call me an English rose because of my fair skin an auburn hair. Hmm…she used to comment on how polite and calm I am and how genuine I am. She used to encourage me to stand up for myself because I can be a bit of a push over.

23. What do you yourself think are your strengths and weaknesses?

A: Strengths: Loving, Helpful, Polite, Caring, Creative, imaginative, I love being moved emotionally, I love that I can be moved to tears easily when watching a film or reading a book, Considerate, I believe that I can empathise with people, I need time alone just to find out what it is that I am feeling), Very good listener, Enthusiastic when talking about something I know a lot about or am passionate about, friendly, conscientious, hardworking, achieving, quick learner, adaptable, understands things easily

Weaknesses: Perfectionist, Not very assertive, Self doubt a lot, sensitive, easily hurt, takes things personally, read too much into what someone says to me, moody, push over/doormat, anxious, sometimes snappy (usually at home where I have less control over myself), worry, gullible, adventurous in my heart but not in my actions.

Strength and weakness: I tend to pick up on other peoples emotions and take them on as my own to the point where I can feel very overwhelmed. I find that when this happens it’s hard for me to dig out what I am feeling or what my thoughts are on a situation; this is when I need time along to reflect.
 

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What do you think about the descriptions of ISFJ?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What do you think about the descriptions of ISFJ?
Hi,

Almost a good match some points that sound a lot like me are:

ISFJs are often unappreciated, at work, home, and play. Ironically, because they prove over and over that they can be relied on for their loyalty and unstinting, high-quality work, those around them often take them for granted--even take advantage of them. Admittedly, the problem is sometimes aggravated by the ISFJs themselves; for instance, they are notoriously bad at delegating ("If you want it done right, do it yourself"). And although they're hurt by being treated like doormats, they are often unwilling to toot their own horns about their accomplishments because they feel that although they deserve more credit than they're getting, it's somehow wrong to want any sort of reward for doing work (which is supposed to be a virtue in itself). (And as low-profile Is, their actions don't call attention to themselves as with charismatic Es.) Because of all of this, ISFJs are often overworked, and as a result may suffer from psychosomatic illnesses.

In the workplace, ISFJs are methodical and accurate workers, often with very good memories and unexpected analytic abilities; they are also good with people in small-group or one-on-one situations because of their patient and genuinely sympathetic approach to dealing with others. ISFJs make pleasant and reliable co-workers and exemplary employees, but tend to be harried and uncomfortable in supervisory roles.

I disagree with this:

ISFJs are characterized above all by their desire to serve others, their "need to be needed."

I'm not sure about this one. I feel that I have a responsibility to serve others rather then feeling like I need to...more like I have to. I tend to desire to be like by others.

ISFJs are extremely warm and demonstrative within the family circle--and often possessive of their loved ones, as well. When these include Es who want to socialize with the rest of the world, or self-contained ITs, the ISFJ must learn to adjust to these behaviors and not interpret them as rejection. Being SJs, they place a strong emphasis on conventional behavior (although, unlike STJs, they are usually as concerned with being "nice" as with strict propriety); if any of their nearest and dearest depart from the straight-and-narrow, it causes the ISFJ major embarrassment.

I'm not possessive at all and I certainly wouldn't be embarrassed by what a family member did because we are all individuals.

I think my sister might be extrovert and she tends to go off and do her own thing and sometimes my mum will react by saying that she can't be bothered with us when really I think she just has different priorities and has a life of her own outside of us. She keeps in touch just not in the same way, or as often, as my older brother.

My younger brother can sometimes be dismissive of my feelings and ideas and this can feel like rejection, but I know that he thinks differently to me. I tend to bounce a lot of my ideas of him so I can see how annoying I can be sometimes, I get over the initial feeling of rejection pretty quickly.

Like most Is, ISFJs have a few, close friends. They are extremely loyal to these, and are ready to provide emotional and practical support at a moment's notice. (However, like most Fs they hate confrontation; if you get into a fight, don't expect them to jump in after you. You can count on them, however, run and get the nearest authority figure.)

I tend not to have close friends because it always ends messy. I have people that I get on with and a surrounded by, but I'd say that my family are my friends.

I disagree with the comment that if someone gets into a fight I won't jump in after the person. I generally won't display violence but I can give as good as I can get. There have been times where I have argued with someone because they have hit a nerve. I would also say that if a friend or family member got into an argument or a fight I would stick by them and stand up for them, as long as I thought they were right, or I would try to calm the situation down.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I keep trying to think of other examples I can give about myself. I am definitely Introverted and I am definitely a Feeling person, but I can't work out if I use Fi or Fe more...I also can't work out if I am a Sensor or Intuitor and whether I use Ne or Ni or Se or Si.

These are just random thoughts; they may be of some help to those who are interested in typing me:

  • I dislike playing games such as chess because I get bored easily and I cannot be bothered to work out what someone's next move is.
  • I enjoy playing games like Cluedo, mostly because I usually end up winning and I'm pretty good at figuring out what cards other people have etc. Plus I'm good at bluffing what cards I have.
  • Computer games: I don't like playing games with 'levels' such as Tomb Raider or Fable. I love watching other people do it because it allows me to admire the graphics and scenery and the characters.
  • Computer games: I love playing games like Halo and Call of Duty because you interact with other people such as friends and family and you can jump in any time and pretty much do what you want. There are no rules. I don't play computers very much but these are my preferences when I do.
  • I also find games such as Cafe World on Facebook fun, where you create your own cafe and you have to make money by selling food. I love the ascetic side of it, interior decorating. However Once I've got the cafe to look how I want it to I am finished with it and no longer play it.
  • A couple of days ago I auditioned for a lead role in a play. The audition began with improvisation work, which I really enjoyed and felt that I did well in. We were also asked to dance to a peace of music, we were given no rules we just made it up ourselves. I love this because I often do this at home; I feel the music and allow my body to move. I also had a cool idea to combine the dancing with acting so I pretended I was knelt down by a lake and moving my hand through the water and I picked something up out of the water, like ribbon, something a gymnast would use and I imagined that I was twirling it around. My friends said I looked pretty good! When it came to the 'Monologue' I didn't do so well. I was nervous and we had to read the part of a character. We have 10 minutes to prepare and I thought I had it sussed out. I planned what I was going to do, but when it came to it my nerves took over and I ended up rushing it and it went by in a blur.
  • When I am around people I pick up on the atmosphere and I automatically find myself reflecting other people's feelings. If I am around enthusiastic people I notice that my expressions on my face become more dramatic and I talk louder to join in.
  • When I watch a movie with other people I have a habit of looking at their faces to see how they are reacting to a particular scene as if to check that my reactions are correct.
  • If I am invited to a party I will spend the nights leading up to it imagining who I might meet there and how I should react to the people. It’s as if I am preparing myself for the worst-case scenario. Of course when I go to the party it is nothing like how I imagined.
  • Sometimes I come across triggers for past memories and I will act them out (on my own) and bring back the feelings that I had at that time. I often end up upsetting myself when I do this and it is usually bad memories.
  • A lot of my drawings and paintings come from my imagination. When I was studying art in school we were encouraged to draw ‘real’ things such as objects. I found this type of thing boring because I’d much prefer to create something from my imagination. I don't very often draw things that are in front of me.
  • I dislike abstract art because I don't see its purpose other than looking pretty on a wall. I like to feel something when I look at a piece of artwork.
  • I love impressionist paintings because they capture the essence and the atmosphere. They may not draw the objects in detail but you can see what they are, instead they capture the 'soul' the beauty of the scene.
  • I was never very good at conceptual art or art that involved building and constructing things. I had no imagination when it came to things like this. I much prefer to sit and draw or paint.
  • I'm also a fan of the pre raphaelite paintings and I'm a huge fan of illustrators such as Arthur Rackham.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Some more info:

  • When I'm driving I listen to my music really loud and I like to sing along to it.
  • When other people are driving and I am the passenger I don't notice much that is going on around me because I tend to get lost in thought.
 

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Some more stuff:

When I go shopping I like to get in and get out!

For example myself and two of my friends went food shopping together and I went around the shop finding everthing that I needed. When I was done I said to my friends how long are you going to be and they said we just need to go to the frozen section and then we are done.

So I said ok I'll go pay and meet you outside. I was waiting just over 20 minutes for them outside!! I know this sounds impatient, but this is one of the reasons why I don't like going shopping with other people because I like to get in and get out. Not hang around.
 

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INFJ throughout, if you ask me.

I also do the getting off late and arriving just in time. Seems to be an Ni trait :proud:.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Have you tried INFP?

Check out INFJ or INFP? a closer look for the differences between INFP and INFJ... :happy:
Thank you for that think. I think I can safely say that I very much relate more to INFJ's then INFP's.

I found this particular page a 'eurika!' moment: INFJ or INFP? a closer look

I tried thinking about my conversations with my housemates over the last couple of weeks and I have this urge to reveal information to them about myself. I have told them about my anxiety disorder, I have discussed with them my beliefs. I actually enjoy revealing this kind of information because it means they reveal something in return and it is fascinating finding out what we all have in common.

My 'revealing' of myself tends to be stretched out and I will only say something if I think it is appropriate. Unlike one of my housemates who seems to make every conversation about her.

There was also a page about initiating conversations or being a responder. I think most of my life I have been a responder. For example people would usually say "good morning" to me first and I would reply "good morning". I noticed this a lot and it is something I've actually been working on, because I feel more comfortable when someone starts talking to me first so I try to do the same for others to make them feel welcome. I will sometimes try to initiate conversation by asking them how they are today or what their name is, but as this isn't a natural thing for me to do I often forget and find myself back to responding.

Today in one of my lectures I sat on a table with 3 other people and it was one of them who asked me my name and initiated the conversation with me.

I'm rambling now!
 

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Ok here is list of descriptions - one fits one type better the other fits the other type - highlight the ones that you think are you characteristics, then I will post up the associated type.


Type #1:
Perceive events in an episodic manner – discrete states rather than continuous changes.
More inclined to say how stages A, B and C are.
Describe events in a general manner and by comparing them to other similar events.
More inclined to talk of properties and structures of reality.
The stories of statics usually involve one constant main character.
Perceive and define themselves, and others, primarily through individual/personal qualities: interesting, pleasant, unpleasant, good-looking, etc, not in connection to any group they may belong to.
Form their relationships/attitudes toward other persons based on the latter's own individual characteristics, not with base on their relationships to groups of any kind, nor on their relationships to representatives of such groups.
Not inclined to perceive their acquaintances as representatives of a certain "circle of contacts" that supposedly possesses qualities inherent to people of that circle.
Not inclined to use expressions that generalize group features.
Tend to minimize the emotional elements of interaction, preferring to focus on the 'business' elements.
Have emotional 'anchors' (eg, books, films, places) which they use to support their internal emotional state.
Can become 'emotionally hooked', and can have a strong reaction to a particular part or section regardless of their feelings towards the entirety.
Have greater difficulty disassociating from others' emotions and experiences than from requests for action or consideration.
Inclined to solve problems by primarily using that information which is 'at hand'. Accordingly, their solutions are likely to be particular to that situation.
The search for the solution is implied in the answer.
“You cannot prepare for everything.”
More inclined to solve problems in systems of things and processes.
"This glass is half-empty", "We need $62,000 for that project"
Usually more reprimanding than complimenting.
Socially and intellectually more mistrusting.
Explains what things are not (irrationals) or should not be (rationals).
Bad at noticing emotional background and do not separate the emotional aspect (particularly 'fun') from the activity.
Acquaintance with others is established by ritual (e.g., introduction), and they prefer if the context of interaction is externally set (eg, by a mediator (think 'arranged marriages') or situation) so that they can skip the first phases and begin closer interaction. They approach others through stages defined by 'rules' and 'rituals', which may be created by themselves and/or already existing; thus, they are very aware of the stages of the process of acquaintance – e.g., when a person is no longer a stranger. The title, name, and any other information about the other person are considered important, and for this reason formal introduction is important.
Inclined to believe there are 'objective truths' – the truth is not always relative. Therefore, they believe that there are two types of actions/perspectives: those which are subjective (connected with personal preferences and motivations) and those which are objective (only one 'correct' or 'best' way of doing something). Whether something is correct or not is judged by comparing it with what they see as 'objectively correct'. In disagreement, they first attempt to make sure that the other person understands the concepts and terms 'correctly'.
They are inclined to offer (or impose) what they see as the 'best' or 'correct' way of doing something ('it should be done like this'). If they think something is done incorrectly, they ask WHO did it that way. When speaking of optimums, they are inclined to do so objectively (the 'absolute' optimum).
“It is difficult for me to differentiate between activity/work and fun; work is necessarily fun – without an element of entertainment, it would be impossible” “If something is being done the wrong way? Oy! IMO, there is only one proper way to 'hammer a nail'”


Type #2:
Good at noticing emotional background and perceive the emotional aspect (particularly 'fun') separate from the activity.
'Getting to know someone' happens naturally, and they are well aware of the purpose(s) for which they are meeting. The proper emotional distance is easily established, adapted/regulated, and manipulated, and they easily decrease distance through their emotional 'brilliance'. A person's name (and other formalities) are peripheral to their relation with and interest in them, and thus they don't care much about formal introductions..
Not inclined to deduce 'objective truths' from their own and others' experiences – everything is relative. This relativity is perceived as an extenuation of the differing beliefs, opinions, intentions, etc. of each person. Accordingly, another person's actions are judged as correct or incorrect according to a set of subjective criteria. They attempt to compare others' views to their own, and to explain their own views in order to make sure that all parties understand the concepts being spoken of.
They are inclined to propose (or impose) another conception of the situation ('look at it this way'). If they think something is done incorrectly, they will ask WHY it was done that way. When talking about optimums, they are inclined to do it subjectively ('optimum compared to what?').
“Fun is involvement, active participation; a state of constant excitement that one cannot confuse with leisure or rest.” “I have my own ideas about how things should be done – a 'mind of my own' – but so does everyone else.”
Inclined to perceive and define themselves, and others, through groups they belong to; however, such groups are perceived and defined by the Aristocrats themselves, not necessarily accepting those groupings as defined by others or by social conventions.
Their initial attitude to another person is influenced by their attitude to the group they see the person as belonging to.
Tend to attribute common qualities to members of their circles of contacts, and define such circles by those same qualities.
Inclined to use expressions that generalize group features.
Tend to concentrate foremost on the emotional background of interaction, with 'business' a secondary concern.
Prefer the new and novel over the old and known.
Information perceived as unprofessional or low-quality can leave them indifferent.
Have greater difficulty disassociating from requests for action or consideration than from others' emotions and experiences.
Perceive events in a continuous sequence – continuous changes rather than discrete states.
More inclined to say how stage A leads to stage B, and how stage B leads to stage C.
Describe events in a specific and concrete manner.
More inclined to talk of movements and interactions of reality.
The stories of dynamics usually involve multiple main characters.
More inclined to optimize already functional systems of things and processes.
"This glass is half-full", "We have already collected $438,000 for that project"
Usually more complimenting than reprimanding.
Socially and intellectually more trusting.
Explains what things are (irrationals) or should be (rationals).
Inclined to solve problems by primarily using that information which they possess through knowledge and experience. Accordingly, their solutions are likely to be of a general nature.
The search for the solution is explicit in the answer.
“It is best to prepare in advance.”
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi Vel,

That was a tough one! I found it very difficult to understand what some of the points mean. I think this is why I have trouble choosing between particular types. I have made BOLD what I think is me, the font not in bold is not me and the coloured font is points that I couldn't choose between because I need an example of a situation that it applies to.

Type #1:
  • Perceive events in an episodic manner – discrete states rather than continuous changes. – Don’t really understand what this means
  • More inclined to say how stages A, B and C are.
  • Describe events in a general manner and by comparing them to other similar events.
    [*]More inclined to talk of properties and structures of reality.
    [*]The stories of statics usually involve one constant main character.
    [*]Perceive and define themselves, and others, primarily through individual/personal qualities: interesting, pleasant, unpleasant, good-looking, etc, not in connection to any group they may belong to.
    [*]Form their relationships/attitudes toward other persons based on the latter's own individual characteristics, not with base on their relationships to groups of any kind, nor on their relationships to representatives of such groups.
    [*]Not inclined to perceive their acquaintances as representatives of a certain "circle of contacts" that supposedly possesses qualities inherent to people of that circle.
    [*]Not inclined to use expressions that generalize group features.
    [*]Tend to minimize the emotional elements of interaction, preferring to focus on the 'business' elements.
    [*]Have emotional 'anchors' (eg, books, films, places) which they use to support their internal emotional state.
    [*]Can become 'emotionally hooked', and can have a strong reaction to a particular part or section regardless of their feelings towards the entirety.
  • Have greater difficulty disassociating from others' emotions and experiences than from requests for action or consideration. – Don’t’ know what this means.
    [*]Inclined to solve problems by primarily using that information which is 'at hand'. Accordingly, their solutions are likely to be particular to that situation.
    [*]The search for the solution is implied in the answer.
    [*]“You cannot prepare for everything.”
    [*]More inclined to solve problems in systems of things and processes.
    [*]"This glass is half-empty", "We need $62,000 for that project"
    [*]Usually more reprimanding than complimenting.
  • Socially and intellectually more mistrusting. – My family would say that I am a very trusting person but that is only because I don't voice doubts I have. I usually give someone the benefit of the doubt until they prove me wrong.
  • Explains what things are not (irrationals) or should not be (rationals).
  • Bad at noticing emotional background and do not separate the emotional aspect (particularly 'fun') from the activity.
    [*]Acquaintance with others is established by ritual (e.g., introduction), and they prefer if the context of interaction is externally set (eg, by a mediator (think 'arranged marriages') or situation) so that they can skip the first phases and begin closer interaction. They approach others through stages defined by 'rules' and 'rituals', which may be created by themselves and/or already existing; thus, they are very aware of the stages of the process of acquaintance – e.g., when a person is no longer a stranger. The title, name, and any other information about the other person are considered important, and for this reason formal introduction is important.
    [*]Inclined to believe there are 'objective truths' – the truth is not always relative. Therefore, they believe that there are two types of actions/perspectives: those which are subjective (connected with personal preferences and motivations) and those which are objective (only one 'correct' or 'best' way of doing something). Whether something is correct or not is judged by comparing it with what they see as 'objectively correct'. In disagreement, they first attempt to make sure that the other person understands the concepts and terms 'correctly'.
    [*]They are inclined to offer (or impose) what they see as the 'best' or 'correct' way of doing something ('it should be done like this'). If they think something is done incorrectly, they ask WHO did it that way. When speaking of optimums, they are inclined to do so objectively (the 'absolute' optimum).
    [*]“It is difficult for me to differentiate between activity/work and fun; work is necessarily fun – without an element of entertainment, it would be impossible” “If something is being done the wrong way? Oy! IMO, there is only one proper way to 'hammer a nail'”


Type #2:

  • [*]Good at noticing emotional background and perceive the emotional aspect (particularly 'fun') separate from the activity.
    [*]'Getting to know someone' happens naturally, and they are well aware of the purpose(s) for which they are meeting. The proper emotional distance is easily established, adapted/regulated, and manipulated, and they easily decrease distance through their emotional 'brilliance'. A person's name (and other formalities) are peripheral to their relation with and interest in them, and thus they don't care much about formal introductions.
  • Not inclined to deduce 'objective truths' from their own and others' experiences – everything is relative. This relativity is perceived as an extenuation of the differing beliefs, opinions, intentions, etc. of each person. Accordingly, another person's actions are judged as correct or incorrect according to a set of subjective criteria. They attempt to compare others' views to their own, and to explain their own views in order to make sure that all parties understand the concepts being spoken of.
    [*]They are inclined to propose (or impose) another conception of the situation ('look at it this way'). If they think something is done incorrectly, they will ask WHY it was done that way. When talking about optimums, they are inclined to do it subjectively ('optimum compared to what?').
    [*]“Fun is involvement, active participation; a state of constant excitement that one cannot confuse with leisure or rest.” “I have my own ideas about how things should be done – a 'mind of my own' – but so does everyone else.”
  • Inclined to perceive and define themselves, and others, through groups they belong to; however, such groups are perceived and defined by the Aristocrats themselves, not necessarily accepting those groupings as defined by others or by social conventions.
  • Their initial attitude to another person is influenced by their attitude to the group they see the person as belonging to.
  • Tend to attribute common qualities to members of their circles of contacts, and define such circles by those same qualities.
  • Inclined to use expressions that generalize group features.
  • Tend to concentrate foremost on the emotional background of interaction, with 'business' a secondary concern.
    [*]Prefer the new and novel over the old and known.
  • Information perceived as unprofessional or low-quality can leave them indifferent.
  • Have greater difficulty disassociating from requests for action or consideration than from others' emotions and experiences. – Don’t know what this means
  • Perceive events in a continuous sequence – continuous changes rather than discrete states. – Don’t know what this means
    [*]More inclined to say how stage A leads to stage B, and how stage B leads to stage C.
    [*]Describe events in a specific and concrete manner.
  • More inclined to talk of movements and interactions of reality.
    [*]The stories of dynamics usually involve multiple main characters.
  • More inclined to optimize already functional systems of things and processes.
  • "This glass is half-full", "We have already collected $438,000 for that project"
  • Usually more complimenting than reprimanding.
  • Socially and intellectually more trusting. - not sure. I definitely come across to others as being trusting/naive and I think this has something to do with me trying to see the good in people. However, I generally don't say if I don't trust someone I keep it to myself until it is proven either way.
    [*]Explains what things are (irrationals) or should be (rationals).
  • Inclined to solve problems by primarily using that information which they possess through knowledge and experience. Accordingly, their solutions are likely to be of a general nature.
  • The search for the solution is explicit in the answer.
  • “It is best to prepare in advance.”
 

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This doesn't apply to any one particular one situation but how you are most likely to feel, so you'd have to find several situations for each option to mark it off, not just one instance. You highlighted 6 options from one and 6 from the other so then it is deadlock >.<

Do you have a feeling which set is more you though?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
This doesn't apply to any one particular one situation but how you are most likely to feel, so you'd have to find several situations for each option to mark it off, not just one instance. You highlighted 6 options from one and 6 from the other so then it is deadlock >.<

Do you have a feeling which set is more you though?
Oh no! It's so hard to choose. I'm going to go with Type 1, mostly because there are more in bold that I think are definitely me than the ones I made bold in the other type.
 

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You seem to be interested in analyzing certain occurrences that popped up during your day and it's connection with typology. Sounds like you have a logical nugget inside of you. I think Ti and Fe are your preferred servers rather than Fi and Te. Fi/Te looks something like knowing how you feel and what is right for yourself without any opinions from others. INFPs and ISFPs can come by as stubborn because of this. As a supposed Fe user, how I come by to others and ties and loyalties with friends and family often is how I know what is right for myself.

Also, rather than asking yourself if you are Si or Se and Ni or Ne, ask yourself, am I Si/Ne or Se/Ni?

The Si/Ne combo implies that you reflect on concrete experiences and facts and see what you could or should do with them. For example, I recently read an article about a design for a personal blimp and thought about other planes and their speeds and how a fast airship might be constructed.

Se/Ni implies that you foresee things without external reference and by looking outwards at the concrete world, find what is true and what is not. Think of this as developing your own conspiracy theories such as one where you believe the animals in a forest are all controlled by one brain (I made this up entirely). By exploring the woods, you see things for yourself that each animal senses and reacts for themselves. This assumes that you haven't seen flocks of birds flying together.
 

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Which exercise comes more naturally to you and corresponds more to the way you feel?

Exercise 1:
• As you come across the action of any mammal engaged in any activity (including humans), say to yourself, "He/she is feeling ______ because he is needing ______" and fill in the blanks. Guess the mammal's emotion as accurately as you can, by paying close attention to every detail of its behavior and trying to imagine what emotion that you might feel if you were that kind of mammal and acting that way. Guess the need by intuiting the inner calling of the animal that is emerging in the way it's responding to its environment, by recalling a similar need of your own. For example, if you see a Scotty dog sniffing around at a new suitcase, you might guess, "He is feeling apprehensive because he has a need to know he's safe." Or you might guess, "He is feeling curious because he has a need to learn all about the world around him." It depends unpredictably on exactly what you really observe. Key is to watch the mammal extremely closely, so your guess emerges spontaneously from empathizing, and not, say, by consciously reasoning on the basis of something you've read. Your guess must come from the fact that you yourself genuinely feel it. It must come from the heart.
• Try the same exercise on yourself at odd moments: self-empathy. Simply monitor how much you like or dislike something, and what in your nature is being fulfilled or frustrated to cause that feeling of like or dislike. Note that attending to your emotion alone is not enough; you must trace the emotion back to a need that is being fulfilled or frustrated. However, if you're having trouble with this, you might try just consciously noting your emotion for a while, as a starter exercise.

Exercise #2:
• Make a list of people you have some culturally recognized relationship with: different relatives, your spouse or boy/girlfriend, your boss/employees/co-workers, etc., and identify your ritual obligations to them that derive from (or define) these relationships. For example, whose birthday must you remember? Who must you send a Christmas card to? How must you dress at different occasions to indicate your relationship to your co-workers? Whom do you call by their first name and whom by an honorific (even "Mom")? How is it made obvious to all that you have this relationship? How would you feel or how would they feel if someone did not perform their ritual obligations?
• As you come across the action of any person engaged in any activity, say to yourself, "he did ______ because he wants to show ______ relationship." For example, if a man tips his hat to a lady, say to yourself, "He tipped his hat to her because he wants to show that he is loyal to her." If a woman quotes Proust in a conversation, say to yourself, "She quoted Proust to show that she wants to be seen as the expert and she wants others to defer to her authority." This can get very complex and tricky. For example, what does it mean if someone doesn't show up at your baby shower? Does that show that they don't consider you an important person in their life? If a friend you haven't seen in a long time addresses you as "Mr. Tibbs" (assuming your last name is Tibbs), what does that show about your friend's understanding of your friendship? That's an awfully formal way for friends to speak, so it seems like a cold gesture, aimed at showing that he wants to keep you at a distance. See any Seinfeld episode for lots more analysis of this kind.
• Try to get someone to treat you a certain way that defines a role for you. For example, try to get someone to treat you like royalty, or like a disposable slave, or like an expert authority, or like an eager student who wants to learn from them. You will have to, in some way, define a complementary role for them at the same time, through your actions. You can't ask explicitly that they treat you that way, except as a very last resort. You have to get the mutual roles going by, in effect, painting them in the complementary role first so they find themselves naturally playing along and painting you in the role you want. You may find that it's tricky to get painted in a positive role, but it can be done if you give the other person a complementary role that they really like. In effect, an implicit contract is created: you paint them in a role they like, and they paint you in a role you like.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hi Vel,

I found both exercises relatively easy. The second required more thought though, so I'm going to say that the first exercise is more natural to me because this is what I tend to do more when I am around people. If I see that they are upset I automatically try to empathise with them by putting myself in their shoes, or thinking about when I might have felt that way.

Below is how I worked through each exercise:

Exercise 1

For the first exercise I remembered something that happened a couple of days ago. I was in my University Faculty Office and a girl was talking to the administrators getting quite upset. She had missed a couple of her lectures because she was not well and said that one of her tutors had treated her appallingly for being ill! I didn't know the girl very well but I could relate to her getting upset and I thought I'd be crying too if I were in her shoes. In fact I felt the urge to tell her that I would be reacting in the same way. So when it came to fill in the blanks I put:

"She is feeling miserable and frustrated because she is needing reassurance"

Exercise 2:

For the second exercise I found it quite easy to make a list of my family, co workers and what is expected of me culturally. And I could think straight away how my family members would feel if these 'cultural norms/rules' were broken. I especially know how my older brother and his wife would feel if we forgot to send them an anniversary card - unloved - they don't have many friends so they cherish receiving cards from the few friends and family they do have.

For the second point I put "She's talking about her gap year again, because it's the only thing she can use to make her self appear mature."

For the last point in the second exercise I've actually managed to do this kind of thing to my brother before, convincing him to do something for me. I think I often alter my behaviour to suit different people. If I want to make someone feel more confident I will act like I don't know as much about the subject as they do. It all depends on my mood.
 

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The first profile that you said sounds more like you is IxFP profile. The second one was the INFJ one.
First exercise is introverted feeling, which is what you said happens to you naturally anyway when you are around people. Second one is extraverted feeling which required more thought on your part to engage.

So my verdict is that you are an IxFP.

I'm going to quote myself form another post here:
Another thing that I have read a socionics website that I thought was very clever is this. They say that people who are confused about being N or S are usually those who have these functions close to each other, so they would belong to a X-N/S-X types. Whereas people who get confused about being T or F are those who have those functions closer together so they would belong to X-F/T-X type. Thus INFJs most commonly confuse themselves with INTJs because they can feel themselves flipping between thinking or feeling often due to these functions being close together in their ladder: Ni-Fe-Ti-Se. However IxFPs have most confusion with being a sensor vs intuitive because their functional order is Fi-N/S-Te so intuitive and sensory functions are close together and they wouldn't be able to easily recognize which one they use the most.
If I remember correctly you did have trouble identifying whether you use sensory or intuitive function more which does corresponds more to confusion that IxFPs as susceptible to having because their sensory and intuitive functions are close together. INFJs are more likely to wonder if they might be INTJs or INTPs even because we can be using feeling and thinking functions in equal proportions so have trouble deciding whether we use T or F more.
 

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Okay. I'm gonna try to give you a reading based on the answers you gave. Just my opinions here.
1. The question was supposed to determine whether you use Ti or Te. Ti goes into details, while Te is more executive. Instead of just giving us the answer (Ti in this case), you told us how you feel about your procrastination (Fi). This tells me that F is your dominant and T is your final function. This happens to be the case in INFPs (most likely), ISFPs, ESFJs, and ENFJs. I also found it amusing that you had to stick F in a T question. lol.
2. Similar situation. This question was supposed to determine whether you use Se or Si. Se tries to experience life in the moment (usually for enjoyment) while Si tries to gather and learn from experiences (usually to avoid pain). You decided to give us a completely Ne answer. Ne is the creative part of the brain. It usualy asks "what if?" It is what you use when you wonder whether or not someone is exagerating. Ne is extremely dependant on stimuli from others. This is why you like to "bounce ideas" off of others; it's just Ne. Ne is not even found in INFJs, but it is the secondary function of INFPs (which I'm starting to expect that you are.)
3. another T question. You basically said you want to use Te, but your Fi usually gets in the way. classic INFP.
4. This is definitely Si. INFPs have it as their third function, but in INFJs it doesn't even make the list.
5. Fi on steroids.
6. No point in finding meaning? Ni and Ti would definitely disagree with that. INFJs happen to have both.
7. This question basically asked you if you had Fe. You said "Yes" in a way that was packed with Fi. (Fe is used in seeing where others are, while Fi is focused on justifying things or ideas.)
8. This question asked you if you have Ni. This time you said "No" in a way that was packed with Ne.
9.Fi (yes/ I know they are not trying to hurt me) + Ne (depends on my mood) + Si (In the past) + Te (I had to hold back the tears) = definite INFP.
10.Te + Si
11.Fi + Ne
okay. I did half of them and am almost positive you are an INFP. These tests really suck, but when a person puts the answers in their own words, their personality can't help but shine through. I hope my observations were helpful.
 

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The first profile that you said sounds more like you is IxFP profile. The second one was the INFJ one.
First exercise is introverted feeling, which is what you said happens to you naturally anyway when you are around people. Second one is extraverted feeling which required more thought on your part to engage.

So my verdict is that you are an IxFP.

I'm going to quote myself form another post here:

If I remember correctly you did have trouble identifying whether you use sensory or intuitive function more which does corresponds more to confusion that IxFPs as susceptible to having because their sensory and intuitive functions are close together. INFJs are more likely to wonder if they might be INTJs or INTPs even because we can be using feeling and thinking functions in equal proportions so have trouble deciding whether we use T or F more.
Thank you so much Vel! I really appreciate your time and effort! I have just read the INFP profile and the ISFP profile and I definitely seem to fit INFP better than ISFP. In fact INFP is a very good match.

Now all I need to do is change the INFJ under my name to INFP...
 
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