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Hi! I am a a sophomore female college student who simply can't make up her mind. Although I have finished a year at school, I still cannot determine a major that fits me. I am most definitely an ENTP, but I am female which leads to some ENFP qualities. After stumbling upon this forum, I have found that I am not the only one with the "problem" of wanting to do everything- that is something normal for ENTP's! I have many career dreams and goals, but I am unsure of the best route to achieve them.

Things I would love to do: (yes i dream very big!)
- serve as a chief of staff for an elected official
- produce a television show
- open a restaurant that had swing dancing and live music
- be a news anchor
- work directly under a CEO
- be a campaign manager
- work for NASA
- work for Disney
- sales
-etc
-on top of one of these, my ultimate goal would be to have a family, so I don't want a major/career that would jeopardize that.

My favorite subjects are history and science, but unfortunately I have no desire to go into the medical field or become a professor. I am currently in Industrial and Systems Engineering, but I have no desire to work in an engineering environment. I know I have the skills to get the degree, and I genuinely want to learn how to run a business efficiently. I am very big-picture and people oriented and worry I would be bogged down with detailed homework. I also enjoy being very involved on campus, and am worried my major my be too time consuming. But then again I AM at college to receive a degree.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read this- ANY wisdom or guidance you could give me would be greatly appreciated!!
 

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@Mary Lou

IE degrees actually help you with tons of jobs some of which are on your list. (NASA, Disney, Sales, Assisting a CEO)
So I would finish that up first if I were you.

But I'm a bit concerned to be honest... why are you always playing second fiddle?
As an ENTP I cant think of anything more terrifying than working directly under someone as an end-goal.
 

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History and any science degrees are actually pretty valuable in the business world. They're both considered practical, even if they don't relate at all to your field. The most common Bachelor's degree of all Fortune 500 CEOs is History. It sounds like you're going to end up with a job title that doesn't at all describe what you're doing (like "project manager," "sales consultant," "assistant director," etc.) because you have many talents and interests that loosely revolve around business. You will probably have no idea what you want to be when you grow up, at least for the next 5-10 years. My advice is to just finish a degree that isn't totally hilarious (please don't get a degree in film) in a subject which you're decent in and find interesting. Don't worry about a career yet, but start exploring things that interest you in the world of business and learn as much as you can. People with your trajectory tend to do just fine without a long-term goal.

I'm not saying any of this from experience; I picked a very specific trajectory (graphic design and advertising) and it got me nowhere. But I've worked with a lot of people like you and they all seem to do better with their meandering path.
 

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A family and a career might be hard to combine. When do you see yourself having kids? A lot of the positions you mention seem to be MBA-level positions, are you up for that?

I would stay in industrial and systems engineering. It's an excellent field and it doesn't necessarily limit you to working in an engineering environment at all.
 

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Like you, I went into college wanting to do a lot but I could not narrow down it. I liked art, literature, and science. The only thing I had narrowed down was that I did not like Chemistry and there seemed to be thousands of women picking biology (which sadly was because it was one of the few sciences that did not require them to take much math) so I figured the competition coming out would be hard so I didn't want to do that. While I was in college, I worked as a secretary/lab helper at a chemical laboratory and stumbled upon two female geologists. It was like a light went off-geology, it's a science that has more math, gets you outdoors instead of being locked up in a lab, and it is a whole lot of theory because we don't have time machines and can't go back to see exactly how things got deposited. I ended up majoring in geology and minoring in anthropology. Although there seems to be a heavy influence in environmental geology or environmental science but I find that that is a much fluffier major with not as much calculus and physics required. I did go into environmental consulting and really enjoy it. Although a minor in business would probably have helped but I figured it out. The projects are diverse and ever changing-no two sites are alike, the hours are usually flexible (unless you are doing field work), and although I work for a company, it is a career that you can easily be your own boss if you choose. Also, since you were interested in sales, the consultant themselves really becomes the sale person too. Environmental consulting, like most businesses, clients stick because of the interpersonal relationships and then pass on your name to their friends. I get to give presentations to my clients that are sales calls disguised as technical presentations. I also make sales calls by taking them out to lunch and BS-ing with them. I'm going golfing today for a client golf outing. Also, I have been doing this for 17 years full time and have two kids and a full time working husband. I mentioned the flexibility, that is key not only for the mental state of an ENTP but it essential if you want to be a working mom who doesn't rely on a nanny to raise their kids.

I do agree with @devoid though, really though, picking a major that is not too specific but in a field you enjoy is best. ENTPs can usually talk their way into jobs, so having the exact degree is not always necessary. I can tell you from being someone in the position of hiring, once you start working, barely anyone looks at your degree anymore, they only look at your experience and that you got some sort of degree.
 
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So, some words to comfort you: Most jobs only care that you have a degree, what it's in matters less. So by picking a major you aren't really limiting yourself, just opening up more opportunities that require degrees.

Anyway, I can't make a complete recommendation because I'm sure we have different interests, but I can tell you what I'm planning to do. I'm actually the same age as you, and there's a very likely chance I'll change my mind within a year or two, but at least it's a thought.
I'm planning to get a degree in social work. I'm picking it because I do really like learning about people, but I wasn't really feeling full blown psyc (too much bio and history and theories, not enough current stuff). If you major in Social work you can get a masters in just one year, and there are a TON of things to do with the degree.
So for me it's not too much science or math, but it's more useful than an art or literature degree. It's a good general major.
Now the downside is social workers don't make a ton of money, but apparently you can have a somewhat flexible schedule.

So I guess my advice is to pick a major that has several career paths you'd be interested in, not one with a specific job in mind. That way you won't panic about limiting yourself.

Tbh I might just go with the working for Disney option too...
I already live in Orlando. I work with kids at a place that gets a lot of donations from Disney. I even have an annual pass.
But getting an education first is probably the smart way to go...
 

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Currently in a similar situation. I'm interested in everything, but I'm especially into screenwriting and journalism, while keeping law school in sight. I'm thinking of double majoring in English and either Political Science or Philosophy. I know my career will involve interpersonal communication, writing, analysis and some level of creative output.
 

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If you think (or know) you're good at something, lets say screenwriting for example, then prove it. Write something. See if you suck or indeed are great at it. There are many things you think you could be good at, that's quite ENTP. But everyone else only cares about the things you can actually prove. Show that you are a great writer by writing a great screenplay.

"If I were the head of research at GM they would build flying cars within six months", bold claim. Now can I prove it? Nah not really, so noone cares. Could be true, could not be, I will not get there to try it out. I have to show people that it's true beforehand. Proving it would be best but if that's not possible I still have to be convincing.

Personally, I don't see "a career" as an interesting life goal - in fact I think it mostly sounds like a cage. I always tried to do what I like and what is interesting to me. And since that is changing over time I switch sometimes and tryout different things. Opportunities will present themselves or you can make them yourself. No need to stress out about conventions too much, because most ENTPs will fail at those anyway. ;)
 
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