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Hello, everyone. I am new to the forum here, though I have read some of the threads in the past.

I am currently finishing my MA in linguistics and cultural studies and one of my courses is in politeness. We've discussed the history of the concept and what it entails, intercultural differences in politeness strategies, and how these are manifested linguistically.

So the semester is at its end and my idea for a term paper was to work on the various ways people express endearment when they refer to others, and so I need to gather some material :D

I thought this would be a good place to post, as it might start an interesting discussion about the correlation between personality type and naming strategies.

So if you are interested, would you mind answering some questions for me? :) And of course you're welcome to leave any comments you may have without doing that.

1.1. Do you have any nicknames which your friends, family, or acquaintances use to refer to you? (These can be anything from Richard - Rich to Richard - The King of Darkness)
1.2. What is their origin/the story behind them?
1.3. Do people in your age group use similar strategies when devising nicknames for their peers?
1.4. Do people from your country/cultural or linguistic background use similar strategies?
2.1. Do your friends, family, or acquaintances use commonplace terms of endearment (e.g. honey, dear) to refer to you?
2.2. How close are you with the people who use them?
2.3. Do they use them on a day-to-day basis (e.g. How are you, dear?) or only in situations when you've spoken about something particularly personal/ a topic which makes you emotional?
2.4. Is this commonplace for people of your age group, your cultural and/or linguistic background, your country?
3.1. Do your friends, family, or acquaintances use terms which are typically considered vulgar (e.g. bastard, bitch, hoe) as terms of endearment when they refer to you? (Note: This question is completely serious :D)
3.2. How close are you with the people who use them?
3.3. Is this commonplace for people of your age group, your cultural and/or linguistic background, your country?

I am really grateful to anyone who read this and decides to participate :)) I am not sure if I am going to include this in my paper, as I do not think my lecturer is familiar with MBTI, but I wonder how you think/feel some of these correlate with the personality type you identify with? :D

Thanks!
 

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Hello, everyone. I am new to the forum here, though I have read some of the threads in the past.

I am currently finishing my MA in linguistics and cultural studies and one of my courses is in politeness. We've discussed the history of the concept and what it entails, intercultural differences in politeness strategies, and how these are manifested linguistically.

So the semester is at its end and my idea for a term paper was to work on the various ways people express endearment when they refer to others, and so I need to gather some material :D

I thought this would be a good place to post, as it might start an interesting discussion about the correlation between personality type and naming strategies.


1.1. Do you have any nicknames which your friends, family, or acquaintances use to refer to you? (These can be anything from Richard - Rich to Richard - The King of Darkness)

every one does call me dick, even total strangers

1.2. What is their origin/the story behind them?

maybe because I am a dick? I dunno

1.3. Do people in your age group use similar strategies when devising nicknames for their peers?

they call my sister cunt

1.4. Do people from your country/cultural or linguistic background use similar strategies?

prolly, never axed



2.1. Do your friends, family, or acquaintances use commonplace terms of endearment (e.g. honey, dear) to refer to you?

they call me ''fucking dick'' for what it's worth

2.2. How close are you with the people who use them?



10-50 yards, it varies

2.3. Do they use them on a day-to-day basis (e.g. How are you, dear?) or only in situations when you've spoken about something




particularly personal/ a topic which makes you emotional?

every time I leave the crib some yells ''you fucking dick, what the fuck is wrong with you'', like I'm supposed to know

2.4. Is this commonplace for people of your age group, your cultural and/or linguistic background, your country?

why yes, yes it is

3.1. Do your friends, family, or acquaintances use terms which are typically considered vulgar (e.g. bastard, bitch, hoe) as terms of endearment when they refer to you? (Note: This question is completely serious :D)

my black foster parents called me their little ''vanilla assed kraka bean'' I don't find that offensive

:cool:
 

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1.1. Do you have any nicknames which your friends, family, or acquaintances use to refer to you? (These can be anything from Richard - Rich to Richard - The King of Darkness)

Nope. My name is Heather, which doesn't really come with a nickname. Though my great grandma used to call me feather when she was alive and I was a super tiny baby... methinks it was because dentures. xD

1.2. What is their origin/the story behind them?

I do have a secret nickname that my parents gave me that I use on health forms to 'release' information these days. My mother made it up when I was born, and uses it as a loving nickname in the house. Otherwise no one knows it exists unless I tell them. My nickname was used as a form of security during my childhood... in the event someone tried to take me, they had to know my "password". Kid you not! This was before comupters and cellphones and before passwords were ever a commonplace thing.

1.3. Do people in your age group use similar strategies when devising nicknames for their peers?
Not likely. But nicknames can come from a variety of reasons. Sometimes a nickname can be from your name, other times it can be what you do, where you're from, a mistake you've made that was a little funny and it just sort of stuck, your mom just decided it'd be your nickname, etc.

1.4. Do people from your country/cultural or linguistic background use similar strategies?
I wish my name could have a nickname, but alas. I googled my name to see if there are any... :(

2.1. Do your friends, family, or acquaintances use commonplace terms of endearment (e.g. honey, dear) to refer to you?
Yup. Those are my nicknames.

2.2. How close are you with the people who use them?
From aquantance, to coworkers (not in a creepy dude sort of way, my old female coworker always tacks on 'sweetie' or 'dear' if she really wants something, I would ignore anyone else who did this at work...) to family, to my boyfriend <3

2.3. Do they use them on a day-to-day basis (e.g. How are you, dear?) or only in situations when you've spoken about something particularly personal/ a topic which makes you emotional?
Day-to-day. Likely because I don't have a true nickname.

2.4. Is this commonplace for people of your age group, your cultural and/or linguistic background, your country? Age group?
No.... people my age don't use terms of endearment towards me unless it's my boyfriend or best friend. Older folks yes. Cultural, yes... as my family comes from england and german/austrian/hungarian.. the germanic roots typically diminutize females in some way whether through their actual name or an endearment.

3.1. Do your friends, family, or acquaintances use terms which are typically considered vulgar (e.g. bastard, bitch, hoe) as terms of endearment when they refer to you? (Note: This question is completely serious :D)
My best friend... hahaha.

3.2. How close are you with the people who use them?
My best friend is the only individual to get away with calling me a vulgar name because I KNOW she's not being serious about its actual meaning.

3.3. Is this commonplace for people of your age group, your cultural and/or linguistic background, your country?
... sadly yes... age group... America.... wish it wasn't that way though. Would be nice if people would call each other nicer names, or expand their vocabulary of what to call people. I was brought up differently.


Hope my answers were helpful! Wish you the best of luck on your paper!
 
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and one of my courses is in politeness.
Well dare I say I'm terribly glad you've decided to acquaint yourself with the crucial ins and outs of politeness, unlike 'some' (by some I mean most) of your ruffian generation the Millenials. Which, do excuse me, but if one hasn't reached the age of 1,000 years of age, how can one be considered a Millenial? The age, aside from a number, is more importantly something to be earned. It's not polite to assume for oneself the societal status (and the modified modalities of etiquette that come with it) of a proper Millenial just by 'by fiat'.

By the way dear, the word you're looking for is etiquette, not politeness. It has it's own dedicated word, there's no need to alter another word with the clumsy '-ness'... which one finds themselves doing when one hasn't any idea what the dedicated word for a thing is. Makes text tread along smoothly and more neatly in the theater of the mind the more you can lessen the appearance of the suffix '-ness'.

Anyway, please don't take this ther wrong way dear, but your name really ought to be augmented (albeit somewhat slightly)... unless there are two of you conjoined at the hip, you ought only to be one Lyxie, not Lyxies. It's rather rude and impolite to hoard to oneself things they haven't got nor need... makes you come across as avaricious with a slight dash of gluttony of a particularly nasty kind. A rather dreadful way to start off a first impression.

Now then, I trust that when you typed this post, you held aloft both pinkies halfway in the air like a proper lady? What's that? No? Then I'm afraid you'll have to start this whole enterprise al over again. No, no, that just won't do. We can't set about illuminating others to the necessities of etiquette, whilst needing an introduction to it's most basic of fundamentals oneself... my word. Are we civilized, or are we dwelling in the forest with animal cloth around our genitalia, rubbing twigs together for fire?

I suggest with the highest advocacy to acquire and read the book '100 Common Mistakes In Etiquette - And How to Avoid Them', by Ms. Emily Post, which covers the issue of typing and pinkies in the first sentence of the first chapter. And upon completion of this book, you are then to read 'Etiquette In Society, In Business, In Politics and at the Home', also by Ms. Post. Then you are to report back to me in these environs, that I might review your progress.

Well... go on now. Time is of the essence, as they say... chop chop. I said good day ma'am.

(puts top hat on, first by lowering the head 45 degrees, then sliding it at a slightly lesser degree, resulting in a smooth ice-skating-like transference from hand to head)
:gentleman:

 
For the layman bystander who hasn't the time to digest these thorough tomes, like the student here, for a tl;dr version of that... consider the member called @Catwalk . The most improper, lewd and unladylike affront to the polite sensibilities of mankind terrorizing these forums today. Anything she does, let you find yourself not doing... and you should find yourself in good standing in the eyes of a civilized society.

May god have mercy on the soul of the woman who bore forth such a satanic ne'er-do-well.
 

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1.1. Do you have any nicknames which your friends, family, or acquaintances use to refer to you? (These can be anything from Richard - Rich to Richard - The King of Darkness)
Yes. My old classmates call me oto.
1.2. What is their origin/the story behind them?
My old English names was Toto, and there is a brand called Oto, so they call me Oto.
1.3. Do people in your age group use similar strategies when devising nicknames for their peers?
Maybe not
1.4. Do people from your country/cultural or linguistic background use similar strategies?
maybe not
2.1. Do your friends, family, or acquaintances use commonplace terms of endearment (e.g. honey, dear) to refer to you?
No. It is probably because I don't have any close friends or boyfriend. I am an introvert. I can chat with many people in my class,
but cannot develop close relationship with them.

2.2. How close are you with the people who use them?
For the people who call me oto, they are my old classmates. Some of them were my old friends, but most are people who are not close to me at all.
2.3. Do they use them on a day-to-day basis (e.g. How are you, dear?) or only in situations when you've spoken about something particularly personal/ a topic which makes you emotional?
They call me oto every day.
2.4. Is this commonplace for people of your age group, your cultural and/or linguistic background, your country?
We do create nicknames for people, and we use nicknames every day.
3.1. Do your friends, family, or acquaintances use terms which are typically considered vulgar (e.g. bastard, bitch, hoe) as terms of endearment when they refer to you? (Note: This question is completely serious :D)
Nicknames are usually friendly, but I don't like the one my old classmates call me.
3.2. How close are you with the people who use them?
3.3. Is this commonplace for people of your age group, your cultural and/or linguistic background, your country?
 

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I don't think it is appropriate to use MBTI in your term paper. MBTI is not a serious way of assessing personality. You can use the Big Five, if you want something to represent the personality of participants.
 

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1.1. Do you have any nicknames which your friends, family, or acquaintances use to refer to you? (These can be anything from Richard - Rich to Richard - The King of Darkness)
nope

1.2. What is their origin/the story behind them?
nothing, unless you would talk about bullies in school, then I had several... like waffle...

1.3. Do people in your age group use similar strategies when devising nicknames for their peers?
very rarely, usually with unusual or long names that are rare by themselves.

1.4. Do people from your country/cultural or linguistic background use similar strategies?
Not really, in Russia it's far more common to say shortened names, but these aren't nicknames

2.1. Do your friends, family, or acquaintances use commonplace terms of endearment (e.g. honey, dear) to refer to you?
Only something like shit, asshole, delinquent... I guess they are commonplace and normal...

2.2. How close are you with the people who use them?
Mom and dad, so pretty close


2.3. Do they use them on a day-to-day basis (e.g. How are you, dear?) or only in situations when you've spoken about something particularly personal/ a topic which makes you emotional?
Not always they use that, but when I annoy them, so pretty common


2.4. Is this commonplace for people of your age group, your cultural and/or linguistic background, your country?
Spilling shit verbally on each other should be written in UNESCO, that's a culture's thing in Lithuania for lots of ages.

3.1. Do your friends, family, or acquaintances use terms which are typically considered vulgar (e.g. bastard, bitch, hoe) as terms of endearment when they refer to you? (Note: This question is completely serious :D)
As endearment no, maybe delinquent was used, but extremely rarely. Basically no. I don't get why you don't think yo uare truly serious while asking this, it's pretty normal.


3.2. How close are you with the people who use them?
Mom, pretty close

3.3. Is this commonplace for people of your age group, your cultural and/or linguistic background, your country?
It's common for moms to call their kids bastards in joking ways or maybe even being a bit proud of that, not really meaning to offend anyone. Pretty normal to be harsh to each other. 100 years ago it was normal for adults to mock kids sometimes, spank them. They just were seen as fresh clueless creatures, that were noobs at everything. Not respectable position at all.


I am really grateful to anyone who read this and decides to participate :)) I am not sure if I am going to include this in my paper, as I do not think my lecturer is familiar with MBTI, but I wonder how you think/feel some of these correlate with the personality type you identify with? :D
I don't even care about your paper, I just wanna share. As to personality type, it surely has effect on how you look to others, but that's so variating that it's impossible to correlate anything worthy.
 

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1.1. Do you have any nicknames which your friends, family, or acquaintances use to refer to you? (These can be anything from Richard - Rich to Richard - The King of Darkness)
People call me Tim or Timmy, unfortunately.

1.2. What is their origin/the story behind them?
My brother, who was 7-years-old when I was born, suggested my name should be Timothy/Timmy.

1.3. Do people in your age group use similar strategies when devising nicknames for their peers?
Yeah, shortening names is common.

1.4. Do people from your country/cultural or linguistic background use similar strategies?
Yeah, shortening names is common.

2.1. Do your friends, family, or acquaintances use commonplace terms of endearment (e.g. honey, dear) to refer to you?
Yeah.

2.2. How close are you with the people who use them?
Okay, fuck this!

I give up now...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you very much (especially flutterbee, Omg, and The red spirit). This is immensely helpful :) Most things confirmed what I was already thinking about.
@flutterbee
I found the story about your grandmother's nickname very touching ^^
I also find the correlation between the use of commonplace terms of endearment and the older generation interesting, as I didn't know it was so commonplace before.
@Omg
Don't worry, I won't seriously use MBTI in the term paper, though I might mention something interesting to my lecturer.
Anyway, this is probably a bit personal, irrelevant and ultimately non of my business, but if you would like to become closer to someone and it's you being introverted that's bothering you, I'd strongly encourage going out with people one-on-one. Just saying this, because I used to have a problem with this. But if it's not something you'd like to change, no judgement whatsoever. :)
@The red spirit
Yes, I am from Bulgaria, and the thing about mothers calling their kids "insulting" things is also quite common here ... Mine's favorite is 'little retard' ... But it goes both ways, so she doesn't get upset when I call her 'Bitchelski'
 

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Don't worry, I won't seriously use MBTI in the term paper, though I might mention something interesting to my lecturer.
Anyway, this is probably a bit personal, irrelevant and ultimately non of my business, but if you would like to become closer to someone and it's you being introverted that's bothering you, I'd strongly encourage going out with people one-on-one. Just saying this, because I used to have a problem with this. But if it's not something you'd like to change, no judgement whatsoever. :)
I don't like going out with people one-on-one because it often leads to dead air. Both of u shave nothing to talk about. But when I hang out with a group of people, there is usually at least one person who can come up with something to say.
 

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linguistics and cultural studies
A quest that never ends!

one of my courses is in politeness. We've discussed the history of the concept and what it entails, intercultural differences in politeness strategies, and how these are manifested linguistically.
That's a study with some meat to it. It's interesting how we all have certain expectations of interpersonal respect, but different cultures can approach that so differently.

1.1. Do you have any nicknames which your friends, family, or acquaintances use to refer to you?
My name is Benjamin, but most call me "Ben." Some call me "Benny." I've been given lots of nicknames over the years, typically in the workplace (and I've worked a lot of different jobs). Most of them pertain to my erudite proclivities. At my last job, I was called "Sheldon" (as in Sheldon Cooper), but before that I was called "The Professor."

Interestingly, I was named after Benjamin Franklin (an ENTP) who I refer to as "the mad scientist of the Revolution." Pursuing erudite interests is practically a tradition in my family.

1.2. What is their origin/the story behind them?
Lots and lots of nerdy interests combined with a willingness to engage others when they express a common interest (and sometimes when they don't). Also, people tell me I'm "adorkable."
:tongue:
1.3. Do people in your age group use similar strategies when devising nicknames for their peers?
Yes.

1.4. Do people from your country/cultural or linguistic background use similar strategies?
Yes.

2.1. Do your friends, family, or acquaintances use commonplace terms of endearment (e.g. honey, dear) to refer to you?
Yes.

2.2. How close are you with the people who use them?
Close family. I visit them whenever I can.

2.3. Do they use them on a day-to-day basis (e.g. How are you, dear?) or only in situations when you've spoken about something particularly personal/ a topic which makes you emotional?
Not literally "day-to-day," but a regular basis. Let's say "weekly."

2.4. Is this commonplace for people of your age group, your cultural and/or linguistic background, your country?
Yes.

3.1. Do your friends, family, or acquaintances use terms which are typically considered vulgar (e.g. bastard, bitch, hoe) as terms of endearment when they refer to you?
In college in the late '90s, yes, but we were in our late teens or early 20s back then. It's most likely males with highly expressed Choleric and Sanguine traits who do that sort of thing. Or rather, those types would likely be over-represented if we took a psychometric consensus. That's just a hypothesis at this juncture.

3.2. How close are you with the people who use them?
Still close, though we live in different towns and have different jobs. We mostly communicate over Facebook, but we'd love to get back to the good ol' LAN party days when we'd get together every (or every other) weekend.

3.3. Is this commonplace for people of your age group, your cultural and/or linguistic background, your country?
Yeah, but only under certain (informal) circumstances, and it's more common when we're young adults.

Just for the record, I'm a Melancholy-Phlegmatic (Conscientious-Supportive) INTJ-T, ILI-Ni, Type 5w6, Tritype 514. Mindhunters type is VDI-P (The Researcher).
 
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