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One of my best friends is an INTP, he seemingly has a very small fuse when pushed in social situations or verbal discussions/debates with those that he sees as not quite up to the task, or belligerently not adding value to the conversation, or playing the devils advocate.

As an ENTJ, I understand this, but my tolerance of others while in social situations is seemingly quite a lot higher than his.

However... I find myself reacting in this way in professional situations where long-standing periods of unspoken frustration have developed, or where I find repeated incidences of inefficiency.

It does not seem to matter if I am in a management role or a being managed, or even when dealing with clients.

Just wondering if other ENTJs feel this way, and how they manage it in a professional environment.
 

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Yes, yes and yes.

There is another thread here that talks a bit about work place frustrations for ENTJs. I can’t link using my phone, sorry. But dig around on this sub forum and you’ll find it. I think it was started by guido.

It’s always important to know what is actually within your control (and what could be in your control). Learn how to circumvent stupid rules to achieve your objectives. Just do it in an way that won’t hurt your career or the career of others on your team you actually value. Sounds harsh, but 30 years working has taught me that you are the only one responsible for/accountable to your success. And you must do what is right for you, as no one else (including your boss) truly gives a fuck.
Btw, if you’re caught in the middle management trap, I *feel* for you. It’s a game of motivating those “under” you and managing those “over” you to get you what you need to move forward with xyz objective. Or is that the other way around? Haha good luck
 

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Chatterbox, MOTM August 2013
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Yes, yes and yes.

There is another thread here that talks a bit about work place frustrations for ENTJs. I can’t link using my phone, sorry. But dig around on this sub forum and you’ll find it. I think it was started by guido.

It’s always important to know what is actually within your control (and what could be in your control). Learn how to circumvent stupid rules to achieve your objectives. Just do it in an way that won’t hurt your career or the career of others on your team you actually value. Sounds harsh, but 30 years working has taught me that you are the only one responsible for/accountable to your success. And you must do what is right for you, as no one else (including your boss) truly gives a fuck.
Btw, if you’re caught in the middle management trap, I *feel* for you. It’s a game of motivating those “under” you and managing those “over” you to get you what you need to move forward with xyz objective. Or is that the other way around? Haha good luck

^^^ This. Exactly.
 
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When I was in a professional environment, there were ways around, under, over or through areas of frustration. If there's a recurring frustration, don't be afraid to speak up, make a lateral or even a backwards move, if the situation's out of your control.
 

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...long-standing periods of unspoken frustration have developed, or where I find repeated incidences of inefficiency.
Many times these repeated instances of inefficiency are intentional and exist for some reason that people are strategically concealing for one reason or another. Once those secret motivations can be determined, then the mystery is solved.
 

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"Don't attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by stupidity."

:laughing:
 

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^
is it malicious incompetence or incompetent malice?

or is it that some people can't be bothered to give a shit in many cases? On the surface they're all "corporate rah rah rah" but on the inside they want to blow up the place and everyone inside. Some with good reason. (pls say it's not just me lol)

My boss told me today that our GM likes to kick chairs and bully people by yelling at them to do his bidding. Personally, I have not ever worked with this person in any capacity so I can't really confirm or deny (hehe) what's he like. But I would like to see this in action. Maybe there's a reason morale sucks at this place.
The building is old and falling apart and he is reported to have said things like "I'd renovate but I don't think the employees would appreciate it." It's not about appreciation. It's about setting up a half decent work environment for people so they don't completely hate coming to work.
One of the new analysts is sitting at a desk next to a window where the vinyl siding is peeling off and sticking out. I told him he should go get some gorilla glue and expense it to the company. Just fix it and make the place more presentable.
Luckily I work from home or on the road so I don't have to go to this place all the time. You should see where the sales department is expected to work. Next step down I would be working inside a closet.
 

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Many times these repeated instances of inefficiency are intentional and exist for some reason that people are strategically concealing for one reason or another. Once those secret motivations can be determined, then the mystery is solved.
Find out how people are paid and you will be on your way to understanding what motivates them to do (or not do) what they're doing (or not doing).

In other words, to solve *most* dilemmas, follow the money.

That's in the world of "corporate management." Not every industry mind you, but this my experience a lot of the time.
 

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Ok, so I’ll chime in with a different perspective, but hopefully just as relevant. As some know, I serve in the military. My boss and I are both “nested” in the construct that we are professionals seeking a common goal. As military leaders, we are required to balance 2 things at all time, the welfare of our Soldiers and the accomplishment of our mission. Many feel as if the most critical of part of these two tasks is to “accomplish the mission,” I would argue it is not (here’s where the ENTJ comes in).

If you can build a team focused on the accomplishment of the mission, what is it the leader must do to ensure the mission is accomplished? I would argue, nothing. The mission is accomplished, and you never lifted a finger (no so fast, though). How does one build such a team? It all comes from building a culture of mutual understanding and trust. The leader must place in their subordinates the feeling that “no matter what happens, the leader has my back” and the leader must project an environment of “not EVERYTHING is a ‘no fail’ mission.” Once their is a mutual understanding of how far each group is willing and able to go, the battle lines get set. Now, it’s up to the leader to show how far they are willing to go to ensure the team is successful, in order to motivate the team to achieve greater success then they thought they could (sum of our parts).

When it’s all said a done, leaders should strive to achieve mission success by, with, and through their subordinates hard efforts. Leadership isn’t hard, if you have the capacity to grow teams and know how to motivate people to want to achieve more then just what their contract says they “must” do. Catastropic success is achieved through motivating and growing those around you to be better then they have to be.

Not sure how most corporate bosses are, but what I’d say; if you reference them as “the boss” and not as “Al,” “Dan,” or “Barbara;” they probably have instilled in you (or others) the “guidance, purpose, and motivation to achieve a common goal.” (Army definition of leadership)...

I charge you to be better.
 

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@VadersPilot when you get out into the "real" corporate world, you will then see the true nature of man. And it is uglier than anything you will encounter in war. (hope you see through my exaggerated sarcasm :wink:)

General Maximus said that the advantage of being a soldier over a politician is that you could look your enemy in the eye.

I think there is some truth to this hahaha.

Ok, just taking the piss.
 

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However... I find myself reacting in this way in professional situations where long-standing periods of unspoken frustration have developed, or where I find repeated incidences of inefficiency.
Help the other party solve the problem.

Help them understand why they repeat the mistakes. Is it because of lack of resources, knowledge, tools, time, etc. What are the options they have to have to solve it. What you can do to help solve it.
Do they understand what needs to be done? Do they understand the consequences? Do they care? Why not?
What are their motivations? How can you align their motivations with your interest?
Basically guide them, help them solve their problems so that they will become good suppliers of works for you.

One good book that I like: Organizational Behaviour by Stephen P. Robbins. It helps you understand how humans work.
 
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