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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How has your experiences with the passage of time changed as you aged? I see the phenomenon as a function of information gain. Every new day for a child is filled with the unknown that must be assimilated rather than reduced to similar experiences/concepts. This so called "spark of life" or authenticity to experience is what slows down the passage to time; conversely, routine accelerates this pace as little information is gained (e.g. dreams aside, losing and regaining consciousness during sleep is a massive acceleration in time).

So the second question is, how does one keep life afresh as one ages? Jung speaks of individuation through the inferior function which is consistent with the idea that it forms a new basis of information that the ego has rejected upto this point. So, penny for your thoughts?
 

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Yes and this scares the shit out of me, to be frank.

l didn't have a way to gauge time as a kid, a young person doesn't understand what ''a long time'' feels like, as they are young. lf l had to estimate, l'd say as a kid that a period of about 9 months felt like what 3 years feels like now.

l don't know, countdown to me being dead :sad:

l have noticed that the more l think about this, the more l want to present and less future oriented.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
l have noticed that the more l think about this, the more l want to present and less future oriented.
Yea, it's why mid-life is commonly a time for revaluation and even a reversal of old habits and a way of life. The monotony of time is experienced as an existential angst from having exhausted the information lens of the dominant and auxiliary functions. I suppose the only way to get out of this trap is to take a risk and lose a limb or two.
 

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I think it's something to do with the short/medium/long term perception of time being different. What I often find is the long term things "feel like yesterday", even things that were about a decade ago and I can't believe so much time has passed. In the medium term, it's often the opposite, in that things that happened a couple of months ago can feel like "deep time". In the short term, it depends, for example if I've stayed somewhere for an hour and nothing seems to be happening, it feels like this could last forever (like time is going too slow; this often happens more when I'm anticipating something that's about to happen), but when things are changing rapidly, it feels like time is going too fast.
 

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If you focus on the goal, you'll miss the journey.

If you focus on seeing life through the eyes of others (MBTI, Jung, whatever crap you wanna insert here), you'll miss learning about your own self. At the same time, if you focus on learning about others through a specific lens, you'll miss learning about them as individuals, which is where the real relationships lie.

That wraps up that. We don't become dull by becoming older. We make ourselves dull by never living in the moment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you focus on the goal, you'll miss the journey.

If you focus on seeing life through the eyes of others (MBTI, Jung, whatever crap you wanna insert here), you'll miss learning about your own self. At the same time, if you focus on learning about others through a specific lens, you'll miss learning about them as individuals, which is where the real relationships lie.

That wraps up that. We don't become dull by becoming older. We make ourselves dull by never living in the moment.
This is quite true as there's no time for self-reflection whilst living in the moment/experience. e.g. When I run, I can either make the run seem shorter by zoning out and thinking about work, or I can force myself to turn my attention to form/breathing if I raise the trendmill speed; this seems to stretch out the experience of running by a long shot if I have to work/suffer for it. Perhaps the key is to pay one's undivided attention to whatever he/she's doing at the moment.
 

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This is quite true as there's no time for self-reflection whilst living in the moment/experience. e.g. When I run, I can either make the run seem shorter by zoning out and thinking about work, or I can force myself to turn my attention to form/breathing if I raise the trendmill speed; this seems to stretch out the experience of running by a long shot if I have to work/suffer for it. Perhaps the key is to pay one's undivided attention to whatever he/she's doing at the moment.
Exactly. There's always time to devote towards purposefully thinking of things, but self-reflection, that is, looking at the ways in which you aren't the way you want to be, shouldn't happen.

The treadmill example is like a lot. If you're zoned out, you miss paying attention to what's happening right now, and perhaps if you paid attention, you'd be able to see how you can improve your running.

"Perhaps the key is to pay one's undivided attention to whatever he/she's doing at the moment." Yes it is.
 

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How has your experiences with the passage of time changed as you aged? I see the phenomenon as a function of information gain. Every new day for a child is filled with the unknown that must be assimilated rather than reduced to similar experiences/concepts. This so called "spark of life" or authenticity to experience is what slows down the passage to time; conversely, routine accelerates this pace as little information is gained (e.g. dreams aside, losing and regaining consciousness during sleep is a massive acceleration in time).
It's scary how time starts flying by to be honest. Why? Because nobody will push you anymore when you don't work at changing your own life. You're an adult and in charge of your own choices - but it's easy to get lazy.

When you are younger you are constantly being coached, pushed and forced to make choices. You also get provided with relatively clear criteria of success that you can obtain with enough talent and work.

When you get a bit older (I'm almost 30 now) you start to see the results of your choices. What did I learn? What I can I now do? How can I avoid getting stuck, can I still make major changes to my life?

The clear criteria of success are still there, but now you realize you might have been on the wrong path and it's getting progressively difficult to still change course.

Furthermore, if you have a busy job and a good salary it's so easy to get complacent. Even if it might not be the job you dreamed of... time will fly because there are so many things you 'have' to do -> work, family, holiday, parties, hobbies, start-ups... the moments that you conciously think about where you're going get more sparse.

So the second question is, how does one keep life afresh as one ages? Jung speaks of individuation through the inferior function which is consistent with the idea that it forms a new basis of information that the ego has rejected upto this point. So, penny for your thoughts?
Keep yourself out of balance. Question yourself. Never allow yourself to 'settle' with something you're not happy with. Keep finding new dreams and work at them, no matter your age.
 
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