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Discussion Starter #1
Any other runners out there? Tis the season to be setting PR's.

What are your running goals?

- My goals in 2013 are
Run a marathon: complete May 5, 2013
Run 5 miles in a sub 6:00 pace

How have you done in your recent races?

1st marathon (5/5/2013): 3:53:00 . Not terrible, but not great. Marathons aren't really my thing. The goal was just to finish, not to go for a particular time.

5k (10/27/2013): 18:30. First time I broke the 6 min/mi barrier! bring on the increased mileage!
 

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What are your running goals?
A couple months ago, I became interested in competitive running again.
Goal: Run a sub 16:00 5k once a month, starting next year. *I may do a one or two time trials before January.

How have you done in your recent races?
I haven't ran a race for almost 4 years because it regularly gotten me terribly sick and eventually I burned out during late HS. I don't remember my 5k or 3mile PRs, but I know I broke 17 a few times.
However, I do remember my freshman t&f PRs, 2:11 800m, 1600m 4:45, and 3200m 10:12. Unfortunately, I ran t&f for that one season (^due to sickness after the XC seasons).

Fortunately, I don't get sick from running anymore, so I'm sure I'll shatter those PRs.
 

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I love to run but running for time always leads me to injury. I'm old and have not been able to run much since mid summer due to what seems like a tendon problem in my right leg. I'm having to accept the prognosis that my running days may be over. But I won't give up quite yet. I have decided not to run this winter--I backcountry ski a lot in winter and don't run so much anyway. So I am waiting until spring and then going to try one more time to build up slowly and see what I can do. Thing is, I can still run really well--smooth and pretty fast for a 57 year old with a heavily abused body. It's after I keep paying for any running with lots of pain on the tibial plateau of my right leg.

My goal is simply to be able to run again. As long as I can ski, I don't feel too bad about it. But I do love running, both on the mountain trails behind my house (nearly all closed since the floods), and also on the track at the local high school. I captained my high school track team and won most of the races I ran at 200 and 400 meters. I never lost in triple jump. I just love love love the simple act of running fast. I was thinking about entering some age group track meets but with the recent injuries, there is no way I should do that or could even train.

I saw that Willie Gault ran 200 meters in 22.44 at age 50. I don't want to measure myself against somebody that fast. But I would like to see what I can do. When I run intervals I do many repeats of 200 m between 30 and 35 seconds. I don't know how realistic it would be but I would like at least to break 30 seconds. :crazy:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What are your running goals?
A couple months ago, I became interested in competitive running again.
Goal: Run a sub 16:00 5k once a month, starting next year. *I may do a one or two time trials before January.
Sub 16 is amazing! I Just started running a year ago (and I'm almost 28), so I don't have the energy and recovery I once had when I was young like that... But it sounds like you've taken some time off. How do you prepare your body for that kind of intensity?
 

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Sub 16 is amazing! I Just started running a year ago (and I'm almost 28), so I don't have the energy and recovery I once had when I was young like that... But it sounds like you've taken some time off. How do you prepare your body for that kind of intensity?

#1. Build enderance or recover by running longer and slower distances of various terrains, 3-12miles. These aren't meant to be difficult as it's more important to be consistent.
#2. Tempo runs for distances between 2-5miles. The speed should be slower than race pace yet consistent from start to finish. Ideally, I shouldn't rely on a watch and feel the pace speed. Realistically, feeling the pace is learned by checking splits every X distance while relating tiredness to effort.
#3. Sprinting/running 200m-400m repeats. Run your race pace and faster with no less than 30 seconds rest in between each interval. The total sum of the distance is 3k-5k. For example, I run 400m->400m->200m or 400m->200m or 300m->400m->300m. Personally, this is the hardest workout.
#4. Strength excersises, using weights or not. With all this running, my core and upper body strentgh misses out which would be something noticable in #3 and race day.
#5. Lastly, ~10-20 minutes of stairs, aka super hills :p. I never just do stairs alone or my legs get super sore, it's always sandwiched between two #1's. In fact, #2-#5 are typically preluded or sandwiched by #1's.

#1 and #3 are the bread and butter workouts. The others fill in the gaps. Also, it's a terrible idea to run high intensivity worksout everyday (#3-5), which leaves #1 as the most common and important.

In total, it's 40-70 miles per week which should be about 10-13 hours of running. The smaller amount of miles per week is for tapering and/or from more hills, stairs, and sprints.

*Also, if 70miles/week seems daunting with only #1's. I'd work up to it before doing #2's, 3's, and #5's.
*And, of course take a day off once per week.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
#1. Build enderance or recover by running longer and slower distances of various terrains, 3-12miles. These aren't meant to be difficult as it's more important to be consistent.
#2. Tempo runs for distances between 2-5miles. The speed should be slower than race pace yet consistent from start to finish. Ideally, I shouldn't rely on a watch and feel the pace speed. Realistically, feeling the pace is learned by checking splits every X distance while relating tiredness to effort.
#3. Sprinting/running 200m-400m repeats. Run your race pace and faster with no less than 30 seconds rest in between each interval. The total sum of the distance is 3k-5k. For example, I run 400m->400m->200m or 400m->200m or 300m->400m->300m. Personally, this is the hardest workout.
#4. Strength excersises, using weights or not. With all this running, my core and upper body strentgh misses out which would be something noticable in #3 and race day.
#5. Lastly, ~10-20 minutes of stairs, aka super hills :p. I never just do stairs alone or my legs get super sore, it's always sandwiched between two #1's. In fact, #2-#5 are typically preluded or sandwiched by #1's.

#1 and #3 are the bread and butter workouts. The others fill in the gaps. Also, it's a terrible idea to run high intensivity worksout everyday (#3-5), which leaves #1 as the most common and important.

In total, it's 40-70 miles per week which should be about 10-13 hours of running. The smaller amount of miles per week is for tapering and/or from more hills, stairs, and sprints.

*Also, if 70miles/week seems daunting with only #1's. I'd work up to it before doing #2's, 3's, and #5's.
*And, of course take a day off once per week.
That sounds like a great workout plan; very intense. Props to anyone that has the drive to complete all that stuff on a consistent basis.

I agree the track workouts are the hardest.

I'm currently at about 20 - 30 miles a week, as I cross train with Yoga and also take a day off of all physical activities for more recovery. My goal for the end of the year is to get that sub 6 pace for 5 miles.. so I think i'll probably build more long running into my weekends and continue at the track once a week and 2 tempo runs in the week.
 

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My running goal is to actually stick with running outside. Will be a bit of a challenge with the wet season starting. It's quite an assault to the system to switch from training in the airconditioning to outside in 30+ celcius and an average of 70-90% humidity over the next 6 months.

I'm hoping to be able to a full 5km run in the next couple of months by adding a Saturday morning run to my indoor training schedule.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Running outside is the ONLY way to run! Who wants to feel like a hamster on a treadmill? Yuck.

I agree though, it's about to be cold and dark. I run with a group, though, so it's not quite as bad.

My running goal is to actually stick with running outside. Will be a bit of a challenge with the wet season starting. It's quite an assault to the system to switch from training in the airconditioning to outside in 30+ celcius and an average of 70-90% humidity over the next 6 months.

I'm hoping to be able to a full 5km run in the next couple of months by adding a Saturday morning run to my indoor training schedule.
 

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Running outside is the ONLY way to run! Who wants to feel like a hamster on a treadmill? Yuck.

I agree though, it's about to be cold and dark. I run with a group, though, so it's not quite as bad.
Come live in my corner of the world and you'll quickly see the benefit of an airconditioned gym ;) The heat and humidty are pretty fierce most of the year and those few upcoming monsoon months could pretty much make outdoor sports completely impossible.

Something else: posted this in the questions thread but have yet to receive an answer so let's try this over here. If you go running early in the morning, within 30 minutes after waking up: eat or don't eat until back home?
 

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I love running in the cold and snow. I love running in the rain. Even an occasional epic thunderstorm and downpour in the mountains can be exhilarating if not exactly the safest thing to do. I can handle the dry heat to some extent but heat and humidity kill me. I run less in the hottest months than the rest of the year. I have run on treadmills when doing rehab from surgeries but I really dislike working out indoors. When I was young I played volleyball and basketball indoors and that was fine. But running for me is strictly outdoors and almost always solo.

@Muck Fe that was a great, value-laden post that summarizes the different ways to approach running in as concise a form as I've ever seen. Excellent! I do enjoy the 200-400 meter intervals a lot. Those are also the most beautiful races to watch and that pace is really fun to play with. When it's working it feels like I'm flying but it's all relative. My mind thinks I can run faster then I actually do.
 

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I love running in the cold and snow. I love running in the rain. Even an occasional epic thunderstorm and downpour in the mountains can be exhilarating if not exactly the safest thing to do. I can handle the dry heat to some extent but heat and humidity kill me. I run less in the hottest months than the rest of the year. I have run on treadmills when doing rehab from surgeries but I really dislike working out indoors. When I was young I played volleyball and basketball indoors and that was fine. But running for me is strictly outdoors and almost always solo.

@Muck Fe that was a great, value-laden post that summarizes the different ways to approach running in as concise a form as I've ever seen. Excellent! I do enjoy the 200-400 meter intervals a lot. Those are also the most beautiful races to watch and that pace is really fun to play with. When it's working it feels like I'm flying but it's all relative. My mind thinks I can run faster then I actually do.
It doesn't snow here (SoCal), but it rains. I always feel like a badass running in it even if I'm much slower. And getting wet and muddy is half the fun.
 
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