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Things look, taste and feel far better in our imagination than they do in real life.
After you get what you want, reality sinks in and you find out how much of your desire was just an illusion.

It's easy to take stuff for granted. Falls to the background and you think nothing of it.
We seem to be hardwired to want bigger, better, faster versions of everything around us. It's a strength, but very bad if you direct it to a place like your love life or other people's opinions of you (aka factors which you have no control over).
 

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Somewhat related:
The problem, said Kelly McGonigal, author of the “The Willpower Instinct” (Avery, 2011) and a health psychologist and lecturer at Stanford University, is that there is a disconnect between how we think of ourselves now and how we think of ourselves in the future.

“It’s not that you have to believe you’ll have all the same likes and dislikes you have now, but you have to believe you have the same sense of self,” Dr. McGonigal said. “The future you is just as you as you are right now.”


Brain scans, she said, have shown that there are regions of the brain that activate when we think about other people, and other regions that activate when we think about ourselves.


In cases where people don’t feel much connection to their future selves, the areas of the brain that light up when they are asked to think about themselves in the future are — guess what? — the same ones as when they think about other people.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/25/b...d-to-break-shortcuts.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

I think a lot of people over-estimate what it feels like to get what you want. And the harder you have to work for it, the more time you have to dream up all sorts of things. "If I had this ONE thing, I would finally be happy."
 
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