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Recent Graduates! Is it just me or does "entry level"=2-5 years experience now?

I'd like to see the input on this.

As a recent graduate, being unemployed for 6 months and getting very few interviews despite the near thousands of jobs I've put in for, my confidence isn't doing too great.

In fact, it's downright terrifying.

Entry level jobs are what I tend to apply for, since I am just out of a Master's Degree. However, nearly all these entry level jobs have some fine print of "prefer 2 or more years of related experience"....wait a minute.

ENTRY LEVEL implies to me that you don't need experience????

Maybe it's just my reasoning for being unemployed still, but others I know are in a similar situation.

Does entry level mean recent graduates or 2-5 year experience?

Thoughts?
 

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What kind of jobs are you applying for?

It depends really. Sometimes the experience thing is put there to weed out or discourage under qualified people from even applying in the first place, but I totally get the frustration with "you need experience to get a job, but I need a job to get experience" thing.

Sometimes going into the actual place of business and asking them if they looked at your application and that you're really interested in the job will work...worked for me a few times at least. Got an interview right then and there one time as well, then the job offer. It was entry-level, but still.

For summer jobs between college I wanted to try waitressing because my younger sister is one and makes pretty good money, but never got any interest because I didn't have waitressing experience. My sister was lucky in that her first job she worked at a little breakfast diner doing dishes and coffee and wound up waitressing there after a few months...so now she pretty much gets hired as a waitress anywhere.

Otherwise after graduation I was lucky in that my college had a day where animation studios would come to look at your student films and interview you if they liked the film. Got a job in my career that way before college even ended. The studio I work for, on their application form, says they want animators with at least "2 years experience" but I know that not to actually be true since they hire college graduates a lot. Like I said, possibly to weed out people but they'd rather hire people with good skills and talent regardless of experience.
 
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Preach. I hate this.

Apply anyway. They know they have their pick of the applicant pool because the job market is so bad, and they want to weed out people who are "go-getters." Usually this negatively affects women, who have a tendency to, you know, actually read the job ad and take it seriously, and favors people (usually men) who have the "confidence" to flaunt the rules. There was an article in the Atlantic about this practice recently. Don't let the bastards grind you down!:th_Jttesur:
 

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It's very common in the U.S. job market.

The whole current internship/entry level job process has become a farce post 2008. Entry level jobs want 2-5 years experience (1-3 when I graduated), lo/no pay internships expect you to have the skills of someone with 5 years industry experience. While I am no longer in the early phase of my career, it bothers me a lot to see how ugly and difficult the career entry process has become.

The best suggestion I can offer based on what I've seen is to:

1) apply for jobs that ask for experience anyways. Getting an interview and proving in it you have the skills and intelligence to makeup for a lack of work experience can go a long way to getting you hired.

2) apply for paid internships. Lo pay sucks. Internships suck because it's no longer an apprenticeship relationship. It's just companies who can't afford more overhead finding free (and desperate) labor to do real jobs that should be paid. However, they can often connect you with people in your field who may be able to help connect you with a job opportunity down the road. Also, internships go towards that "years experience" category.

3) In the meantime, NETWORK. Network network network network. Hop on Meetup.com and find professional groups in your area who share the same interests. Join local hobby groups and get to know the people there. They all work somewhere, and odds are they might know someone who can help find you what you're looking for.

4) Don't be afraid to share you are looking for work. I have seen crazy things happen when people speak up about their struggle. I was in a church once, and people were asked to share struggles they were going through. A friend of a friend stood up and said she was out of work and looking for a job. When she explained what she did (medical), someone across the room stood up and said they were looking to hire someone with her skills. She was hired before the day ended.


I know you wern't looking for job advice, but I wanted to offer because I think support is so necessary when you're going through things like this. I distinctly remember what it felt like when I went through this process to find my first real paid job, and it makes me VERY sympathetic to people who are going through it.
 

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entry level around my neck of da hoods usually means ground floor, minimal pay
when searching for work it's all about marketing your self
have you tried a placement agency?
 

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I agree with 2-5 years of experience. The unpaid internships and volunteering I did during college have saved my ass and I still have had trouble.
 

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Just apply. I've applied for jobs where I did not meet the requirements per the advertisement, but still got interviews 'cause I had something interesting on my resume. Apply and include all internships, volunteer, research and TA stuff (since you computed graduate studies) that is related to the position. It's all about how you spin it.
 

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I know exactly how you feel. Shit, I have two years of experience in the automotive industry, one from an internship and another from actual hands on...and its hard for me to find work. I recently informed my employer that I was quitting so I could move back home to look for work there. (I live several hours away, and my apartment was about to renew next month).

I've been applying for jobs for about two months now, and I've only gotten one response, whom informed me a few days later they decided on another candidate. Out of 50 applications. I'm a damn good worker, I know whoever hires me will be glad they did...I just can't seem to sell myself well enough to land interviews....plus its about who you know too.
 
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