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Hey everyone, do any of you know any good resources for some recreational mathematics?

A good, easy interface, not too much reading, game-like perhaps (but not too simple or repetitive) would be good.

I used to be very good at math. I lost interest ~grade eleven and got more into words and meaning and visual/music stuff. However, I feel myself losing my logical side and my "razor" doesn't seem as sharp. I've been very invested in Fe and Ne lately (not that I deliberately choose so or anything) and I feel I really need to get back with giving my Ti more attention. It seems to be what is needed right now in my life to really thrive and be productive and put to work all the ideas and experiences I've had with Ne and Fe.

So yeah, I think doing some math would be good! Any suggestions would be appreciated

Thanks :cool:
 

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Well if you really want to exercise your mind in a very precise and technical way, just get a calculus book and its solution manual to test whether their method of arriving at an answer is better. If you're looking for logical edge it's just a matter of solving problems, every book has a problem set so any book would do. It's easy to find free ones online as well.

If that's a little too heavy for you, personally I find it fun to pick up a geometry book, A highschool one would do, and just look at the theorems and derive them, but without deriving them explicitly. For example:

for the area of a rhombus: A = 1/2*d*d', [where d and d' are the diagonals] which looks suspiciously like the area of a triangle. Although it isn't immediately clear that you can form a right triangle with the diagonals of the rhombus as the legs by taking apart pieces of the rhombus, so I begin recognizing how the diagonals change length when the rhombus is squeezed from one extreme to the other.

The simplest form of a rhombus is a square, and that you can easily make into a right triangle using the diagonals for its base and height. You know what the area of the square actually is and the equation for the area of a triangle, from there you get the length of the diagonals as sqrt(2).

Even though this doesn't rigorously prove the diagonals of a rhombus it's certainly convincing. Of course you can always refer it back to the product of the segments formed by 2 intersecting chords in a circle as being equal, and it's all just beautiful, the circle and square and the infamous sqrt(2) and the area of a triangle and the diagonals of a rhombus are all connected, all just special symmetric manifestations of how length and and area are related.
 

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Hey everyone, do any of you know any good resources for some recreational mathematics?

A good, easy interface, not too much reading, game-like perhaps (but not too simple or repetitive) would be good.

I used to be very good at math. I lost interest ~grade eleven and got more into words and meaning and visual/music stuff. However, I feel myself losing my logical side and my "razor" doesn't seem as sharp. I've been very invested in Fe and Ne lately (not that I deliberately choose so or anything) and I feel I really need to get back with giving my Ti more attention. It seems to be what is needed right now in my life to really thrive and be productive and put to work all the ideas and experiences I've had with Ne and Fe.

So yeah, I think doing some math would be good! Any suggestions would be appreciated

Thanks :cool:
not sure. I work with exponential number theory when I'm bored....
 

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I think Complex Variables is just good for the soul. Who can look at that beautiful Euler's formula and not feel 10 shades brighter
 
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