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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I settled on my type being ISFP. People who have helped me with self typing have said they see a lot of Se in my writing and answers to questionnaires. I fit the description of ISFP pretty well.

However, I was just reading a thread on the Cognistive Functions forum about Se and Si and the posters talk of the two functions has me thinking, once again, that I resonate with Si so much.

For example:

At Mcdonalds, Se is ordering a burger or looking around the establishment. Observing the people, maybe talking with them, while waiting for their burger to arrive.It can also make you seem like a jerk at times when it comes to making memories. I often get people saying I can come off as being mean due to my lack of sentimentalism. I don't take pictures when I'm out with friends, because I'm not interested in looking back on my experiences, I'm concerned with living them. I was there, enjoying it the entire time. It's highly rare that you would see a picture of me while I'm out. We're out to "do a thing" from my perspective, the moment is lived, and then we move on to do the next thing. The conversation a Se user has is pretty enjoyable, but just realize the moment we walk away, that reality is now gone. It was another moment in a day that will soon be upstaged by the next previous moment.
This particularly hit home because when I go into a McDonalds, I notice how the layout is different to last one I was in, whether they have the new touchpads, how it reminds me of when I used to drive home from uni with my parents and we'd always stop off at McDonalds, or the McDs we went to at the service station on our way on holiday.

I ALWAYS seem to relate things back to 'last time I was here..' or 'this reminds me of...' and I'm attracted to things that are familiar and know well. All these things seem to point to Si, not Se. There's a level of detail to my memories that seems Se like though. I could tell you the weather, what I was wearing, what I ate, where I sat.

I will also notice the details of colours and scents and textures, if something is slightly off. I like sitting and enjoying the feel of the sun or wind or water. Sensory things that are associated with Se.

This is the biggest thing that's been making me unsure of my type, I seem to go round in circles. Does anyone have any way of determining if I actually favour Si or Se? Questions or quizzes or tasks
 

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I settled on my type being ISFP. People who have helped me with self typing have said they see a lot of Se in my writing and answers to questionnaires. I fit the description of ISFP pretty well.

However, I was just reading a thread on the Cognistive Functions forum about Se and Si and the posters talk of the two functions has me thinking, once again, that I resonate with Si so much.

For example:



This particularly hit home because when I go into a McDonalds, I notice how the layout is different to last one I was in, whether they have the new touchpads, how it reminds me of when I used to drive home from uni with my parents and we'd always stop off at McDonalds, or the McDs we went to at the service station on our way on holiday.

I ALWAYS seem to relate things back to 'last time I was here..' or 'this reminds me of...' and I'm attracted to things that are familiar and know well. All these things seem to point to Si, not Se. There's a level of detail to my memories that seems Se like though. I could tell you the weather, what I was wearing, what I ate, where I sat.

I will also notice the details of colours and scents and textures, if something is slightly off. I like sitting and enjoying the feel of the sun or wind or water. Sensory things that are associated with Se.

This is the biggest thing that's been making me unsure of my type, I seem to go round in circles. Does anyone have any way of determining if I actually favour Si or Se? Questions or quizzes or tasks
Well, it's important to think one question. Why do you like to do what you do? I enjoy my walks, eating, watching things, but I rarely if ever say. "Hey, that reminds me of X. That is so cool."However, just feeling the wind isn't enough, I like seeing and experiencing different environments as well. Entering a new place for me is quite magical, because my senses are overloaded by all the external details playing out before me. After that, however, I leave it behind and focus on the next thing I'm moving to.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, it's important to think one question. Why do you like to do what you do? I enjoy my walks, eating, watching things, but I rarely if ever say. "Hey, that reminds me of X. That is so cool."However, just feeling the wind isn't enough, I like seeing and experiencing different environments as well. Entering a new place for me is quite magical, because my senses are overloaded by all the external details playing out before me. After that, however, I leave it behind and focus on the next thing I'm moving to.
I still compare new environments to old ones and tend to commit things to memory, an experience isn't just an experience it's something I'll revisit again and again. The more I learn, the more I think I use Si however when it comes to four types that use Si, I don't know which one I'd be. My sensing functions are definitely stronger than my intuitive ones though
 

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Maybe it could be your Ni working... Ni is similiar to Si in a way (well Ni is fuzzier than Si I suppose).
The example of the guy in the fast food is just a random episode, actually it doesn't completely fit me either, but I suppose that it's a pretty description of Se users.
I still compare new environments to old ones and tend to commit things to memory,
I'd do it only if I have a strong and dear memory, otherwise I simply enjoy the new environment.

Well, the (stupid) questions now:
Do you usually walk the same streets when going to work/home/school etc.?
How much focused can you be? When you are doing something important (an exam/job/etc.) do you only focus on it or do you happen to think at something else? (for example when I'm doing something very important I become super-focused, I won't think about anything else, if you talk to me in those moments I won't be able to fully undestand you and be sure that in 3 seconds I will forget what you just said).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, the (stupid) questions now:
Do you usually walk the same streets when going to work/home/school etc.?
How much focused can you be? When you are doing something important (an exam/job/etc.) do you only focus on it or do you happen to think at something else? (for example when I'm doing something very important I become super-focused, I won't think about anything else, if you talk to me in those moments I won't be able to fully undestand you and be sure that in 3 seconds I will forget what you just said).
1. I always walk the same route back, it's the quickest and has the fewest amount of roads or underpasses to cross. Plus it's quite scenic in places!

2. I can be very focused but only under pressure. Like in an exam or if I have a deadline within the next 24 hours then I can enter 'the zone' where I just channel all thoughts and energy into the task. It's not very sustainable though, I'm very much an all or nothing person. If I don't have external pressure I tend to just go along and be distracted by whatever (in fact I have a bit of a reputation of being a 'bad influence' on people, making them relax too much about their work and distract them and skip lectures....). I'm the classic case of just nipping to the shops to buy something then being out for 3 hours because I went in every shop of every kind in case I saw something I wanted despite having a very concise list and a meal plan for the next week so it SHOULD have been a quick trip.
 

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Cognitive function stacking theory is premised on pattern based preferences. This does not mean that people don't use other cognitive functions. It means that people trend towards using the top four functions more often than the bottom four functions. And within the top four functions, they prefer to use them more or less often, reliant on stacking position.

The dominant function is your daily driver and the second/aux function is the support function to it. The third/tertiary function is the relief function to your daily driver so if your daily driver strategy isn't working or is tired, the tert will jump in to help you relax. The inferior function is in opposition to the dominant function and is often knee jerk in reactivity, so in an ISFP, Te will be reactive and flail around.

Not sure if that helps but hopefully it will. What do you use most often?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What do you use most often?
Honestly I'm unsure, I think I keep getting my wires crossed in understanding everything.

Looking at Si/Se I'm not even sure which one I'm using more or if they are both reasonably well developed.

As for overall functions, I think Fi could be a strong contender for my dominant function as (in the least selfish sounding way) I'm very self focused in the sense of spending quite a bit of time focusing on who I am, my own strengths, how things affect me. I am considerate of others but it tends to be through a lens of how I would feel in their place, so using my own feelings and experiences. It took me a long time to see the Fi in me, I overlooked it initially but I do see it now and others on this forum have said they can see it too.
 

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The idea that Si is better at memory and Se is solely in the moment is more of a stereotype that people use to make it easier to test people. Those who use Si will focus on their subjective impressions of what's around them, not the stuff itself, almost as though they are walking around in a painting. The situations they are in feel to them like, "that sort of situation" rather than a totally distinct experience.

I didn't see any Si in what you've posted, and your attention to color and texture seem pretty Se. While it's harder to tell since you say it's your auxiliary function, I would ask about memories that stand out to you. Are the things that have left a lasting impression on you things that include a strong sensory element? Or are they situations that seem like a "perfect" example of an idea, or give you an impression that intrigues you?
 

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Cognitive function stacking theory is premised on pattern based preferences. This does not mean that people don't use other cognitive functions. It means that people trend towards using the top four functions more often than the bottom four functions. And within the top four functions, they prefer to use them more or less often, reliant on stacking position.

The dominant function is your daily driver and the second/aux function is the support function to it. The third/tertiary function is the relief function to your daily driver so if your daily driver strategy isn't working or is tired, the tert will jump in to help you relax. The inferior function is in opposition to the dominant function and is often knee jerk in reactivity, so in an ISFP, Te will be reactive and flail around.

Not sure if that helps but hopefully it will. What do you use most often?
So because I am curious, would you say that your reactive Fi causes you flail around? Would you say, that feeling weakened or bothered by something essentially is a slight on your pride and because of this you feel as if being in such an emotional state is a foreign land to you?
 

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So because I am curious, would you say that your reactive Fi causes you flail around?
Fuck, yeah! I call it baby Fi for good reason. :-D

Would you say, that feeling weakened or bothered by something essentially is a slight on your pride and because of this you feel as if being in such an emotional state is a foreign land to you?
It's not a slight to my pride. It's the vulnerability of it.
 

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Fuck, yeah! I call it baby Fi for good reason. :-D
Ahh, haha. That makes perfect sense. Though, calling it baby Fi makes it seem cute to me. It's not, when I consider how babies work.. emotionally, but yes.

It's not a slight to my pride. It's the vulnerability of it.
That strikes me as intriguing, because I'm not one whom enjoys feeling vulnerable as well. I'm just going to assume that's an aspect of the pattern I can look for, when it comes to Fi.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I didn't see any Si in what you've posted, and your attention to color and texture seem pretty Se. While it's harder to tell since you say it's your auxiliary function, I would ask about memories that stand out to you. Are the things that have left a lasting impression on you things that include a strong sensory element? Or are they situations that seem like a "perfect" example of an idea, or give you an impression that intrigues you?
Hmm, I'm thinking about some of my strongest memories right now and I'd say there's a mix but more sensory. An example would be a memory of a holiday I went on with my family a few summers ago. It was a warm, clear evening so we took a BBQ down to a local beach which was utterly stunning. It had just gone high tide so there wasn't a lot of sand available to sit on and it was about 8 in the evening so we were the only people on this beach (and it was 2 miles long! When the tide was out). I just remember being sat on a towel with my feet in the sand which was slightly damp, the sun starting to dip in the sky which had only a few whispy white clouds and the sea was the clearest I've ever seen, utterly transparent glass-like waves then bright turquoise in deeper areas. No seaweed in sight and the light shone through the crashing waves and sparkled all the way out to sea. If you think of the perfect summer moment then that was it in every sense. The sights (sun sea sand), sounds (the crash then rush of the waves and gulls), smells (ocean air and BBQ), tastes (BBQ and light beer), textures (sand and towel and slight heat of the sun) and even the feeling and atmosphere of it all being endless and stress-free. I remember that sunset being the most perfect sunset ever- like golden amber and when you looked out on top of the cliffs, everything was gold and turning hazy and you could just see rugged cliffs and headlands and ocean either way you turned for as far as you could see. That stands out as being the absolute summer perfection. It fits the ideal. But it's so sensory as well. I remember when we were stood on top of the cliffs watching the sunset, we weren't the only ones as other people had come to watch but at that moment every person was just transfixed and we all looked equally mesmerised.
 

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Yes, I do think you are an ISFP. This memory seems filled with focus on sensory experiences themselves. But about the McDonalds example: the description of Se is really good. I went back and read the original post it came from and it sounds a lot like the Se-doms that I know. Sometimes even the lack of picture-taking. I know a couple Se-doms who like to take pictures, but I think it's mostly because they want to use them for some artistic purpose or they have fairly developed auxiliary Fi and enjoy the ability to reflect on the meaning of their experiences with pictures.

However, it's not necessarily true that Si user will look at things in the McDonalds and notice how they are different than last time, or relate them to past experiences (that's sort of a stereotype of Si). In fact, it's quite likely that an Si-dom wouldn't even notice the sort of differences you mention. The things that make an impression on an Si-dom are pretty impossible to predict. I think the fact that you relate your situation to past events is actually evidence of Se because you are paying attention to sensory detail and relating it, you are looking at what is actually in front of you rather than a subjective impression.

That said, dominant Fi is very reflective and focuses on the meaning of a situation. Through your description of your memory, it was clear you pondered the meaning of that experience, even though you cited very sensory things. An Se-dom is much more likely to look like the "only in the present moment" stereotype of Se, but it makes sense that you would notice and pull in past experiences simply by reflecting on things using your dominant Fi. I actually have noticed that in other Se-users, even some who have dominant Se and only auxiliary Fi.

Hope that's helpful. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes, I do think you are an ISFP. This memory seems filled with focus on sensory experiences themselves. But about the McDonalds example: the description of Se is really good. I went back and read the original post it came from and it sounds a lot like the Se-doms that I know. Sometimes even the lack of picture-taking. I know a couple Se-doms who like to take pictures, but I think it's mostly because they want to use them for some artistic purpose or they have fairly developed auxiliary Fi and enjoy the ability to reflect on the meaning of their experiences with pictures.

However, it's not necessarily true that Si user will look at things in the McDonalds and notice how they are different than last time, or relate them to past experiences (that's sort of a stereotype of Si). In fact, it's quite likely that an Si-dom wouldn't even notice the sort of differences you mention. The things that make an impression on an Si-dom are pretty impossible to predict. I think the fact that you relate your situation to past events is actually evidence of Se because you are paying attention to sensory detail and relating it, you are looking at what is actually in front of you rather than a subjective impression.

That said, dominant Fi is very reflective and focuses on the meaning of a situation. Through your description of your memory, it was clear you pondered the meaning of that experience, even though you cited very sensory things. An Se-dom is much more likely to look like the "only in the present moment" stereotype of Se, but it makes sense that you would notice and pull in past experiences simply by reflecting on things using your dominant Fi. I actually have noticed that in other Se-users, even some who have dominant Se and only auxiliary Fi.

Hope that's helpful. :)
That actually makes a lot of sense that Fi would be a big influencing factor. And when I look at what's been confusing me (the amount of reflection vs just living in the moment as Se is stereotyped to do) then it also makes things clearer.

Thankyou :)
 
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