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I need some help. I've got a lot to do but I'm feeling overwhelmed and lethargic. Nothing seems to be going right and I feel like there's no point in trying anymore. I know it's just my emotions playing tricks on me, but right now I just can't beat them on my own.

Lend some of your advice on healthy ways to escape or face this?
 

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Are you sure you're depressed?

Know that depression is not permanent.

don't listen to those who say "just snap out of it" but eventually you'll "just snap out of it" in your own time and pace.

Find out what may be causing the lethargy.

Find time for yourself and treat yourself with the respect and care you deserve foremost.

Its not much, but I hope that helps

also, find someone who truly cares and listens to you. If you can't find anyone like that just now, do share your thoughts in the forums, if too many INFPs are good for only one thing, its sharing and brooding in someone else's misery lol :happy: joke joke joke no seriously lol.
 

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I need some help. I've got a lot to do but I'm feeling overwhelmed and lethargic. Nothing seems to be going right and I feel like there's no point in trying anymore. I know it's just my emotions playing tricks on me, but right now I just can't beat them on my own.

Lend some of your advice on healthy ways to escape or face this?
So sorry to hear you're feeling lousy :sad:

Wheelie makes a good point
Are you sure you're depressed?
I believe there are online tests available to help you check on this. Just googled' - here's one from my counytry's National health service

Depression test - Health tools - NHS Choices

If you are depressed.....Although not everyone will agree my view is that taking an anti-depressant can be extremely effective. From my own experience and experiences of people i know. Depends on severity but once symptoms become very severe no amount of psychotherapy (and i'm a strong believer in psychotherapy) is likely to help. You have to sort out the messed up brain chemistry. (Psychotherapy in conjunction with an anti-d can be very effective though imo). There are many anti-d's available and your doc could choose one based on your symptoms. One issue to be aware of is they usually take around 3 weeks to kick in.

"Everyday" things which may help: confiding in a supportive friend. In fact simply being with such a person. Also, physical exercise has been shown to benefit - difficult i realise when you're lethargic. Being kind to yourself, e.g. having a long hot soak in a bath if thta's your thing (it is mine). If you're finding work overwhelming then taking a duvet day is an idea. I've done this a few times down the years - phoining in with food poisioning or a 24 hour virus when what i really needed was time out. The "morality" of this can be debated but i figure so long as it's only occasional....

Look after yourself & good luck
 

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Best way to get out of depression was basically to force myself to hang out with people. Positive energy transfers. So eventually I wasn't really depressed anymore because they literally sapped all the negativity out of me.
 

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Make a to do list to figure out the best way to get everything you need to get done done, and then start hacking away at it. if it's anxiety weighing you down, i think that's the best solution. If it's lack of energy/depression too, exercising, hydrating, and eating healthy can help give you the energy you need and a temporary mood boost to get you in the right mind set. I hope this helps and hope you feel better!
 
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Like others said, if you're dealing with clinical depression than outside help and support is always a good idea. I've dealt with anxiety and depression in the past so I can only say what it was like for me and what helped me move on. I used to get easily overwhelmed when lots of different stresses would build and I wouldn't really acknowledge or deal with them - eventually it would start to feel like stress was constantly coming my way and I would get to a point where I would totally withdraw, want to be alone, get anxious being alone but also when hanging out with friends, and having a lot of trouble doing even small tasks.

For me, going to the doctor and starting with meds has been a good solution for me. The last time I went through this though, the doctor was so wonderful that just having him listen to me did wonders. He wasn't my regular doctor and I'd never seen him before but he was so kind and asked me what was happening in my life, and when I told him he really validated me by telling me how hard and big all that stuff was. At that time I took anxiety meds and sleeping pills and for me it was a really effective short term solution. After a couple of months I became engrossed in mindfulness practice and now that has been the single most effective anxiety/depression tool that I have in my tool box - but it's also something I've worked very hard at for over a year and a half and I make myself meditate for at least 20 minutes 3-5 days a week.

I also let my friends and family know what's going on for me. Usually we don't talk about it much more than me letting them know I'm going through a hard time and may need some extra support/alone time/or more friend time. Just having people know and ask me every so often if I'm okay is a big help. It's very hard for me to make myself get out of the house when I get anxious/depressed so I'll often start with inviting people in - just a couple of close friends for an evening of hanging out. Starting slow is key for me because I get overwhelmed if I go from total isolation to a big public outing. E-mail is big for me because I"m not a very social person to begin with.

Another tool I've used is calling a Crisis Line - we have one in my city that you can call 24 hours for anything at all. Some people even call every day just to check in and talk about what they're doing that day. I've used it a couple of times when I'm feeling like I don't know how to reach out to family and friends and just saying the words and having someone else tell me, "Yeah, that sucks. Are you okay?" was really big for me.

And finally, journaling is something I find really helpful. For me, just getting the thoughts and words out of my head and bouncing of someone else or writing them down seems to make a huge difference for me and allows me to get a bit of perspective.
 

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I agree with most of the advice already given! I'm bipolar and these are some of the things that help me:
-Spending time with friends
-Talking to people I love and trust about how I'm feeling
-Therapy (can be useful for an outsider's perspective and gaining coping skills)
-Meditation and prayer
-Exercise
-Journaling/writing poetry
-Setting a regular sleep schedule
-Eating when I'm hungry, but not emotional eating
-Reminding yourself depression is a temporary state
-Sometimes medication (I require medication)

I really hope you feel better soon!:(
 

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Here is what I think/do.

My solutions:

-Finding a way to talk to someone about it. Not complaining but talking about a solution to a certain issue. I hate sounding like I'm complaining but there were times I called someone and just told them about the issue. Then certain solutions started to come up in my head or it would kind of encourage me to think of some kind of thing I could do instead of unproductive complaining. So its like I had someone to listen to me reason it out and in someway feel verified, and also get some advice and their thoughts.

-One of my very practical friends told me "Never think alone." in times hard times. It's too unrealistic, however it's true in many ways. I make sure not to isolate myself too much and make an effort to communicate and talk with people. If anything over the phone or something.

-Exercise. Diet <— those will help a lot

-Journaling. I was depressed for a while. I realized that once I got all the thoughts out of my head and onto, well for me, a word document it made me see things from a different perspective. That helped a lot in the long run in breaking down the issues and brainstorming the problems and solutions.

-Accepting the feeling, but also realizing all the things I can do to improve and that I'm not helpless.

-I try to stay busy doing something, if anything even cleaning my room helps.

-Listening to a play list of the most uplifting music I can find.

-If whatever I'm facing seems overwhelming I just realize I don't have to be perfect and I can just really accept being average or good enough and that's fine.

-I try to be patient and live in the moment. People don't always know what that means. But basically living in the moment means to be doing things to take your mind away from wondering. I make an effort to focus on something else.

-I also find comfort in some sort of spirituality. I personally pray a lot and read the bible. Not preaching here though.

-I was around a friend who had a completely different mindset from me. He's incredibly optimistic. He blamed himself for nothing. I thought it was absurd at first but I saw that situations can be interpreted in completely different viewpoints. It was amazing the ways he looked at a situation in order to not blame himself. I began to do the same thing. I mean, There are still some factors involved on my part. But I learned that nothing is completely my fault at all. There are way to many circumstances involved. Even the circumstances that you want to blame. It's not completely their or it's fault either. The world is too chaotic that there is no point in blaming myself for everything. There are so many creative ways to not blame myself. However only to a liberating extent to the point that I don't feel victimized, otherwise it's a bad thing. But just not being so hard on myself.

-An example- Yesterday I went into a store and asked the employees something, they were like "What? You need to talk louder." I felt somewhat insulted, but I know I'm quiet. But I instantly thought of a way to not blame myself, just because it's more automatic to me now. I said "Oh the music is too loud." And that's a completely valid explanation. If the music wasnt playing in the store they would have heard me. Rather than thinking "Oh yeah they're right. I need to talk louder. I'm too quiet" And beating myself up over something insignificant. For all I know they might have lost their hearing from going to so many rock shows that blast their eardrums off, or they could have just been distracted by something else.

-That thought process has made me more self accepting by actually seeing different, but true perspectives. Nothing ever is all my fault, however I'm not a victim. I can't completely just blame everyone and everything. But having this perspective has actually been really helpful to improving my thought process and outlook about myself and life.

-And because of this it also makes me not blame myself as much for mistakes I've made. I just say "Well hey, what's done is done." implying that something happened. It wasn't completely my fault. And I can learn form these mistakes as well, instead of being too hard on myself and brooding on it. There are also good things to look for in a situation. I learned that situations can be looked at as good or bad or anything. A lot of times when I explained a situation in which I was worried about to my friend he always had a completely contrasting good outlook on the whole situation that actually would make sense to me. So there is really no way to know certain things for sure. It's all about perspective.

-One last thing that I learned is that it's okay for me to be a little selfish and serve myself. It's my life and I need to take care of myself way more than taking care of anyone else. It might sound selfish... but that's the way it should be. That's nature, even if it goes against our ideals of putting others before us. I can't help other people if I can't help myself. However, helping people can help me feel good, which is helping myself. But it just depends on the circumstances and being able to distinguish right and wrong for my personal wellbeing. There are some ideals that I can't live up to. But that's completely fine.

and btw- Everything I mentioned in here I referred to my journal. That's how helpful it's been in establishing these concepts and solutions for me.
 

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Begin to deal with depression leaving medication as the last resort.

I have never been on anti-depressants, at least not yet, though I am dealing with depression. My advice is that before you go to an anti-depressant to try to make you feel happy and better, try a few changes in your life to see if there is a healthy outlet for you to deal with your feelings of depression.

My first step was seeing a therapist. Even if you feel as if you don't have anything of relevance to say, or you have trouble talking about your feelings, it is worth it to go even on days you don't want to. Having someone sit down and sincerely listen to what you have to say not matter how trivial it may seem brings an inner calmness and helps you stay on a healthy track knowing that you will be telling someone what you're doing in your life.

A second step I took was exercise which releases endorphins and gives you a natural high. Though I've never been a fan of the whole idea of 'getting fit to impress random people', I began running because one night I felt so horrible and stressed I wanted to punch anything, I wanted to not be in my skin or anywhere near where I was or what I was feeling, so I went outside at 12 am and just started running. This became a regular occurrence for me and eventually I noticed my self becoming happier, stronger, more confident, and feeling better all around. Running even made me cut back a few unhealthy habits I've formed over the years such as smoking. Since then I've tried other forms such as bikram yoga and trying out different exercises at the gym (though I wasn't really all for the gym to begin with, I caved and actually began to like it. plus I live in new england and I'm a wimp when it comes to running in the snow!)

A third step I have taken is community service. I started working with a families first program that works with children while their parents take different parenting classes. Before I began doing this, I didn't even like children. Now I look forward to seeing these kids every week. Once I began volunteering, I didn't want to leave every time I went because of how nice and accepting the people and children are.


A fourth step that with me goes back years with things I've done for a few years is art of any sort that lets yourself express any feelings and thoughts you may have. Painting and playing bass guitar are a couple that I like to do. Even if I absolutely hate the painting I create, there is a ritualistic feeling that soothes me when I'm feeling blue or angry and supports me when I'm feeling happy.


I don't think there is anything wrong with anti-depressants, I just believe messing with your brains chemicals should be a last resort and should not be taken lightly. I've known friends who've stopped taking medication that they should have been weened off of and then starting back up when they needed to be built up again and them becoming even worse then they started. So my advice is to take medication seriously and listen to your doctor about any side effects and staying on top of it!


Best of luck, and I hope I helped a little
 

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If you are depressed.....Although not everyone will agree my view is that taking an anti-depressant can be extremely effective. From my own experience and experiences of people i know. Depends on severity but once symptoms become very severe no amount of psychotherapy (and i'm a strong believer in psychotherapy) is likely to help. You have to sort out the messed up brain chemistry. (Psychotherapy in conjunction with an anti-d can be very effective though imo). There are many anti-d's available and your doc could choose one based on your symptoms. One issue to be aware of is they usually take around 3 weeks to kick in.
I actually do agree with you. I know that meds are supposed to be "evil," but you're right - sometimes the symptoms are such that all the psychotherapy (which I'm also a firm believer in) and coping mechanisms in the world don't help enough. But I'm only speaking from personal experience - I know my coping mechanisms and can use them effectively to manage stress, but my meds keep things in "balance"...without them, I can practically feel something "switch off."

And to the OP, first of all:

{{{{{HUG}}}}}

You need one of those. :)

You sound overwhelmed, both by your emotions and by whatever external factors you're dealing with in your life. Seeing a therapist (a GOOD therapist) can help a lot if you're not already seeing one. In the meantime, I'll go ahead an tell you what works for me when I'm in a rut. The first thing is being good to yourself - it seems overly simple, but when your emotions are making everything overwhelmingly complicated for you to begin with, simplicity can be a nice relief. Simple things like taking the time to pamper yourself a little - hot bath with nice smelling things, candles, lotion, etc. It's always helped me relax and clear my head a little.

Everyone on this thread has already posted great advice, so I'm not going to repeat it, but most of the things everyone has listed are things that I do myself when I'm under a cloud...and they're very effective things.

Hang in there, lady - you're certainly not alone, and the fact that you're here asking for healthy ways to handle what you're going through tells me that you're quite a bit stronger than you might think you are.
 

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I got out of my depression late last year by hanging out with other people, and although I wasn't sad I still had my moments where my own mind weaved its fibers to create an overcomplicated mesh of thought, causing me to become anxious. Also, it still seems as though few things are going right, but I also found a trick to make it go away: Dive deep within yourself. I do not mean your mind, however, I mean your being. Do that by meditating and feeling how alive you are, centering yourself and your consciousness in yourself rather than your mind. If this does not work, listen to a constant noise around you, then listen to the silence between and behind the noise. Once you do that, accept the reality of everything that is, meaning CENTER YOURSELF IN THE NOW, NOT THE PAST, NOT THE FUTURE. Accept anything you may be denying will bring inner peace. As for the things going right, you have to be able to get out of your negative, depressed state and you need to be able to bring positive energy into everything that you do. It's difficult, and I know this because I'm still working on it, but it's worth it. Positive energy attracts positive energy.
 

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Hi keelysmith and welcome :happy:

Not meaning for you to feel like you're encountering hostility in your first post - but where you say...

I just believe messing with your brains chemicals should be a last resort and should not be taken lightly.
...I'd say that depression (depending on its severity of course) may well mean that the person's brain chemistry is already messed up.

Yep, anti-depressants are not to be taken lightly, but likewise the destructive power of depression itself should not be under-estimated.

The other points you made were great. And sorry to hear that you too are dealing with depression.
 

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I wish I had a solution for depression, even though I'm able to tell what is wrong the problem is that I'd usually need someone else to pull me out of it. Thus I ignored my feelings for a longer time and acted INTJ, but fact is that I've only been able to truly get out of my depression through others who have reached out to me. Talking out about what bothers you to someone who would be able to understand. Although I've sort of wandered about just waiting for someone else to pick me up, you somewhat need to move that shell of a body that keeps your depressed mind, over to somewhere someone would care.
 

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I need some help. I've got a lot to do but I'm feeling overwhelmed and lethargic. Nothing seems to be going right and I feel like there's no point in trying anymore. I know it's just my emotions playing tricks on me, but right now I just can't beat them on my own.

Lend some of your advice on healthy ways to escape or face this?
I still do all the time. I find the best way for me to deal with it is to first realize it's pointless to sit around depressed about anything, even if I'm right in what ever it is that has me feeling that way, feeling depressed doesn't accomplish anything and I have to more forward. I try find something to keep me busy even just small tasks that I can find a sense of accomplishment in. I try to focus on or set a goal in my future and give myself something to be hopeful for. If I have friends I try to be around them.
 

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No worries! I agree with what you're saying completely actually. What I meant was that you should absolutely try other options first because sometimes the problem lays somewhere other then the brain, but if you don't find yourself feeling better then you should definitely talk to a professional about medication!

Thanks for reading my post! And there is no need to apologize, I think everyone deals with it at least a little in their lives. Some a little or a lot more then others, but I know I'm not alone and I find solace in that.
 
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