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I also wouldn't take those statistics too seriously because there is a fair chance that many of those MBTI scores are mistypes. A lawyer will necessarily focus on T at their job. That doesn't mean that F is not a useful trait to have nor that an F lawyer will not succeed.

I think SJs in general tend to be well-suited to legal professions - lots of detail work and SJs tend to excel at remembering detail and understanding structure and regulations. ExFJ is probably very helpful for being good with people relations, as well.

I think if law is your calling, don't worry too much about the math. Pass with Cs if you can and just ensure you keep your grades as high as possible with everything else. SharpestNiFe and Mr. Meepers made excellent points - gear your learning towards law where you can and a philosophy course or two might be helpful. Becoming a paralegal may be a great idea if it's not too much time and money.

I also think that your specialty will sort itself out while you're in law school. If corporate law is your thing, you'll keep going with it. My uncle was a corporate lawyer... worked in NYC, Tokyo, etc... made millions... amazing guy... died young of a heart attack, but he lived a very full, rich life. Pluses and minuses to everything. If you get your toes in the water and decide it's not for you, there are many, many, many other fields.

Good luck with everything :)
 

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I imagine mathematics courses are just to test the candidates all-around ability; it's a positive to have a good grade in it, but it also isn't the be-all and end-all.

The good thing about maths is the more you do it, the easier it gets: While it may seem tricky to you now, with continued practiced, you will get better.

Besides, a candidate who has work experience, good extra-curriculars, good references, has taken time to network, fantastic marks in humanities, etc. is always going to do better than one who simply did well in maths. It probably will take a continued amount of work on your part, but so long as you pass, I don't think your chances will be ruined at all.

Also, a protip to soften the 'blow' of having a weaker score - in an interview, they will likely ask you about any challenges you've had to overcome (or something of that ilk). You can mention how you worked really, really hard at maths - knowing it was a weak subject for you - and got a C, a grade that you are happy with. There's nothing wrong with admitting that you are weak in a certain subject, and furthermore, persevering with these subjects (despite not seeing good results) always looks good. It shows you can dedicate yourself and overcome adversity. Also, I can't speak for all employers, but I'd be impressed at someone who is able to accurately reflect on what their grades mean in context, instead of looking at a C and thinking 'ugh, that's terrible' (or even looking at an A they simply turned up to the exam to get and thinking 'wow, I did amazing').
 

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I wouldn't give up. You have to be good at understanding systems and yes, probably some math, a lot of law is based on economics and other things like that, but in general, strong abstract thinking is required.

Now...I have a question. Is there something you're not telling us here? Do you have brain damage or some sort of disability? Because I am finding it hard to understand that you did so badly at algebra and sub-calculus math.
 

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I think you may be giving up a bit too early but you know your limitations better than anyone.

On a side note, lawyers don't debate, they manipulate facts. There is no opinion in the matter. You need to have a lot of patience, be good with people, and be willing to work 60+ hours a week if the case calls for it.

But lets go ahead and look at the now. You are in community college. You need a bachelors degree of any kind to get into a law program. Law is a graduate program. C students do not get into any kind of gradate program and you can completely forget about something as competitive as law.

Getting C's will barely transfer you into any 4 year university as well.

If math is the only thing you are struggling in then you need to be getting A's in your other courses. And you need to look at getting a degree that is not heavy in math and science. Unfortunately, the degrees heavy in math and science are more easily admitted into certain graduate programs.

The best thing I can think of for you would be a general business degree

Also I cannot stress this enough. It's not what you know, it's who you know. Let's say you finally get your degree. You have done no internships and have not made any connections while in school. That guy sitting next to you getting all D's and C's that has done internships and knows everyone is going to get a job way before you do, regardless of you having a 4.0 or not. Once you get your degree, no one really gives a shit about your GPA.

There is close to no chance you will get a job in corporate without some getting your foot through the door.

But with all that in mind I still wish you the best of luck.
 

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If it's really your dream, you shouldn't give up just because math isn't your thing. Community college is seen as "dumber" than state schools or private universities, but that depends on the community college in question. Sometimes they're smaller and the professors are better. The school itself doesn't automatically render dumb just because it's a community college. So yeah, I wouldn't put too much stock into this. Enroll yourself in classes that will up your GPA. Everyone has their weak points.

There are an abundance of lawyers, but you also have to know your market. There are alllll different types of lawyers. Criminal law is obviously going to be the most elite, but that profession isn't going anywhere. There will always be crime. Bankruptcy lawyer, divorce lawyer - there can never be too many of those in this day and age.

Also, it's your dream. People telling you that you can't be a lawyer because you don't argue well on a forum or because statistics are against you due to your MBTI type are just ridic. Don't listen to it. Follow your heart.
 

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Now...I have a question. Is there something you're not telling us here? Do you have brain damage or some sort of disability? Because I am finding it hard to understand that you did so badly at algebra and sub-calculus math.
While I agree that those subjects themselves are not that difficult to learn and that anyone should be able to learn them, I still think you are jumping to an extreme and unlikely conclusion. I would say that it is much more probable that he suffers from math anxiety, an common anxiety that is seen when people study math. Due to a history of rote learning style of teaching, an emphasis on being right or wrong, a cultural demonization (if you will) of mathematics, a cultural acceptance of mathematical illiteracy over natural language illiteracy, a belief that makes them feel that they just can't learn, and other possible reasons ... many people feel anxious about mathematics. So, if he is just struggling with math, I would think it is probably math anxiety. If there are other subjects, then I would actual guess depression first (seems more likely ... and doesn't assume an inability achieve, although even people with learning disabilities can be smart, especially if they work hard, I would think ^__^ )

Mathematical anxiety - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Math Anxiety Model
The Causes and Prevention of Math Anxiety
Coping With Math Anxiety
 

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While I agree that those subjects themselves are not that difficult to learn and that anyone should be able to learn them, I still think you are jumping to an extreme and unlikely conclusion. I would say that it is much more probable that he suffers from math anxiety, an common anxiety that is seen when people study math. Due to a history of rote learning style of teaching, an emphasis on being right or wrong, a cultural demonization (if you will) of mathematics, a cultural acceptance of mathematical illiteracy over natural language illiteracy, a belief that makes them feel that they just can't learn, and other possible reasons ... many people feel anxious about mathematics. So, if he is just struggling with math, I would think it is probably math anxiety. If there are other subjects, then I would actual guess depression first (seems more likely ... and doesn't assume an inability achieve, although even people with learning disabilities can be smart, especially if they work hard, I would think ^__^ )

Mathematical anxiety - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Math Anxiety Model
The Causes and Prevention of Math Anxiety
Coping With Math Anxiety
Hmm, interesting. Math anxiety is the inferior Ti fear and social anxiety is the inferior Fe fear haha.

Well, anyway, this counts as one of those disabilities I was talking about. I don't know much about the area.
 

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Hmm, interesting. Math anxiety is the inferior Ti fear and social anxiety is the inferior Fe fear haha.

Well, anyway, this counts as one of those disabilities I was talking about. I don't know much about the area.
I'm not sure how related to cognitive functions it is, if at all, since a fear and anxiety over math is very common. I suppose in that sense you could think of it as a "disability", but it is actually kind of common, so calling it a disability may cause people to not realize how common it is (I don't think the term "disability" is usually used when it affects a significant portion of the population, such as around 50%) and that there are things people can do about it.

Edit: Although, if the anxiety is so bad that it causes someone to break down at the sight of math (or have a panic attack), that would probably be considered a disability. But since the OP is considering law (well, asking us he he can instead of immediately saying that he can't) despite having to take more math classes, I would think that is is unlikely his anxiety is on that level.

Below are just some quotes that may give an idea of just how prevalent it is.
 

"The personal and educational consequences of math anxiety are great. Math anxiety affects about 50 percent of the U.S. population and more women than men. Researchers knowRequires Adobe Acrobat Reader that math anxiety starts early. They have documented it in students as young as 5, and that early anxiety snowballs, leading to math difficulties and avoidance that only get worse as children get older. Researchers also know that it is not related to overall intelligence."
- Education Week: Timed Tests and the Development of Math Anxiety

"Math anxiety in teachers, a problem that the education community has been aware for several decades, remains a significant challenge. McAnallen’s dissertation work, which included a survey of almost 700 elementary school teachers, found that 38 percent reported experiencing some kind of math anxiety."
- Math anxiety doesn't just affect students | STEMwire

 

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The lawyer I have now was actually a late in life graduate. So no, it's never too late! The co-counsel I have is VERY experienced and was early in life lawyer. I must confess that both are competent and KNOW their craft and I think so long as you have passion for what you are fighting for, you'll be amazing at whatever you do :)
 
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What if I tell you that I am an INTP and I have both? I never seen it as a disability, just something that I dislike strongly.
It was just an ironic joke, I was making fun of simplistic categories

I'm not sure how related to cognitive functions it is, if at all, since a fear and anxiety over math is very common. I suppose in that sense you could think of it as a "disability", but it is actually kind of common, so calling it a disability may cause people to not realize how common it is (I don't think the term "disability" is usually used when it affects a significant portion of the population, such as around 50%) and that there are things people can do about it.

Edit: Although, if the anxiety is so bad that it causes someone to break down at the sight of math (or have a panic attack), that would probably be considered a disability. But since the OP is considering law (well, asking us he he can instead of immediately saying that he can't) despite having to take more math classes, I would think that is is unlikely his anxiety is on that level.

Below are just some quotes that may give an idea of just how prevalent it is.
 

"The personal and educational consequences of math anxiety are great. Math anxiety affects about 50 percent of the U.S. population and more women than men. Researchers knowRequires Adobe Acrobat Reader that math anxiety starts early. They have documented it in students as young as 5, and that early anxiety snowballs, leading to math difficulties and avoidance that only get worse as children get older. Researchers also know that it is not related to overall intelligence."
- Education Week: Timed Tests and the Development of Math Anxiety

"Math anxiety in teachers, a problem that the education community has been aware for several decades, remains a significant challenge. McAnallen’s dissertation work, which included a survey of almost 700 elementary school teachers, found that 38 percent reported experiencing some kind of math anxiety."
- Math anxiety doesn't just affect students | STEMwire

If it disables him from doing something most people can do and assume of the people around them, then it is a disability. 50%, that's interesting. Whatever his problem is, whether its just a natural lack of ability or a natural avoidance/fear/anxiety, it is clear that it IS affecting him. He paid $2500 for tutoring for a class he only got a C in. $2.5k, aka the cost of getting an associates degree in the US, or a semester of learning at a state school. He needs help, something has to give, because $2500 is an amount that is completely and totally not required for someone who won't struggle with a topic immensely because of something they are simply not capable of understanding.
 

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I'm probably going to be a failure because I have such a hard time with math
Whaaaaaaaat? People tell you that it is okay if you are not good at math, that you can still be a lawyer, so assume you will be a failure because you have trouble with math???

Listen, I feel like that sometimes, not the "being bad at math part", but the feeling that I am may fail or being scared to fail. And I will tell you this, my abilities, or lack there of, have never held me back, but my fears what what held me back. If you are determined enough, you don't have to worry about failure as much because you will learn that it is okay to fail. You can fail and try again. And, even if you never succeed, at least you know you tried. But when give up before you even try with a self defeating attitude, then, you are not giving your best and you are setting your self up to fail.

If this is your dream, then I would hope that you could handle a few failures before you succeeded. As long as you are determined, then you will find a way to succeed in those math courses. But if you are not determined and you go in afraid and not fully engaged (because you lack confidence and/or determination) then you are so much less likely to succeed. Your attitude towards math and yourself is probably going to be your biggest obstacles, not your actual abilities.
 

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Do you have another dream to take it's place.
If not. NO!
Who cares what it costs, you should be willing to pay any price for your dream.
A persons dreams is really all that person has.
To give up on them is giving up life itself.
Now obviously you can switch dreams, but to give up. NEVER!
 
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