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From "An INTP Profile" by Paul James (read and discuss it in this thread):
Because the present is inextricably linked to a sense of the past, INTPs tend to hoard items which help solidify the connection to the past. They find it very difficult to let go of anything they have collected (or indeed created) and which may have a nostalgic meaning. They assume that any object which is of interest now is bound to remain of interest for the rest of their lives. This emphasizes a strong sense of universality in the progression of time, just as it emphasizes the seriousness with which INTPs approach their interests. Frivolity is not in their vocabulary. INTPs often love keeping lists and databases in areas of interest, especially when the lists are associated with things of the past. Collecting periodical magazines or other media of interest is also a very common INTP trait. Such a collection is usually taken very seriously. Yet the collective whole, considered as a temporal rather than spatial object, always assumes more importance in the mind of the INTP than the objects forming the collection themselves. Hence, INTPs are collectors, but they are collecters for whom the objects themselves are only important in so far as they evoke a connection to past events, in so far as they yield a nostalgic mood. The curious problem with any collection of an INTP is that he typically fails to enjoy it in the here and now. Items are stored away so that they can evoke this time at some point in the future, but such a point often never occurs. It may never occur because INTPs are always so mentally active that they continually delve into new interests, and continue to hoard items relating to these, so that they rarely allow themselves enough time to reflect on the ever expanding library of their past. The interests of an INTP would be enough to occupy him for several lifetimes if that were possible.
When I was evaluating whether or not I might be INTP, this characteristic was one of the most surprising. Prior to reading it, I had a tendency to never think of NT-temperament types as sentimental, but Si is apparently "sentimentality incarnate," and so it's not surprising for a tertiary-Si-using INTP to have a bit of a mawkish streak. Surprising - and also vindicating, because I've been doing this exact thing for longer than I can remember. At least a couple other of the INTPs here have said they do the same thing, and one expressed an interest in talking about it with relative strangers.

So, ITT: do you have a hoard? If you do, would you show it to us and/or talking about it a bit? It could be a fun way to get to know your fellow PerC INTPs a bit better.



This is the currently visible portion of my collection. The first thing to note is that I did not pose it for this picture. It sits like this on my dresser at all times. Occasionally, if the items are collecting too much dust, I'll clean them and put them all back in a different order. Visible in this picture:

American Flag, top left. I was awarded this flag at my Eagle Scout court of honor.
Black Belt, just below the flag. I became a black belt in taekwondo at 14 years old, in a very recreational, non-traditional class. I stopped taking taekwondo at age 16, and am no longer worthy of the title "black belt."
Small stack of tags and notes, including Pokemon card, just left of center. These are short notes mostly from appreciative dance partners. I've been a ballroom dancer for the last four years, and many of my partners have given me small gifts (chocolate bars and the like) with notes attached just before big showcase performances. The chocolate, obviously, doesn't last, but the notes, I save. The pokemon card was given to me by my youngest cousin last summer. He's by far the youngest kid in our family (my aunt remarried and had another child). Last summer, my parents and I visited his family, and he gave me this pokemon card. It's "Fossil" - a trainer card which isn't all that great in the game (I used to collect these and play the game when I was younger); but I don't think he realized I knew that, and I thought it was touching for him to try to share his interests with me that way.
Pumpjack button, on top of the stack of notes and things. Part of my costume from my very first solo dance showcase routine, in which I play an uptight hipster protester who falls victim to and is perverted by a beautiful Big Oil woman. Halfway through the routine, my partner rips off my plaid flannel shirt to reveal yuppy business attire beneath, signaling the completion of my transformation. The button actually fell off both times I performed the routine.
 

Uptight hipster.

Freshly transformed big oil shill.

If this dance routine sounds pretentious, it really wasn't; it was all very tongue-in-cheek.

Fake flowers, above the button. A friend gave these to me at a valentines-day (ballroom) dance, saying they complemented my outfit.
Armadillo beany baby in a chinese takeout box, above the fake flowers/stack of notes/pumpjack button. This is one of the oldest items I have. It was a going-away gift from my friends when I moved from Oregon to Washington after my freshman year of high school. It's an inside joke: most of my friends were part of the music program at my first high school, and the music department went on a trip to San Francisco that year for a competition. While we were there, we did a few touristy things, among which was visiting SF's chinatown. For some reason, I thought I would be able to find a stuffed armadillo in one of the shops, and became determined to buy one as a souvenir.
Vitamin Water bottle with birthday inscription, next to the ridiculous armadillo. This was a bottle of special 21st-birthday vitamin water that one of my friends mixed for me. It was one of my first legal drinks.
Chocolate box, below the water bottle. A box that contained chocolate at a combined wine-and-chocolate tasting at the Castello di Amoroso winery in Napa Valley, CA. Some of my dance friends and I went on a wine-tasting tour in the area before the biggest formal ball event that our ballroom studio puts on each year.
Normal salt shaker and decorative steller's jay pepper shaker, next to the chocolate box. Two of my favorites. The salt shaker was a "gift" from a woman I dated a couple years back. On our first date, she was showing off her sleight of hand at dinner. She made the salt shaker disappear, and, in a true display of dedication, only revealed it as I was driving her home hours later, by fake-surreptitiously slipping it into the cupholder. When I got her home, she lured me to her door under the guise of showing me her cactus garden, then looked me in the eye with a smile on her face and flat-out asked me if she could kiss me. You know the way they describe the kiss at the end of The Princess Bride? It was one of those. After a half-hour or so of that, we parted, and she gave me the salt shaker as a gift. For our next date, I bought a pair of decorative bluejay salt and pepper shakers, and presented her the salt shaker, while I kept the pepper shaker for myself.
 

They fit together with magnets. I'm a sappy motherfucker sometimes.

Unfortunately, things didn't work out. That first date is still the best one I've ever been on, and I've never clicked with another person as quickly or easily as I did with her. I would not hesitate to predict that I'd have put a ring on her by now if things had lasted.
Microscope, above the salt and pepper shakers. The item I've had the longest - probably almost twenty years now. My godparents used to get me gifts for my birthday, and they were always educational or scientific. This microscope was part of a whole junior-science set. The only other part of the set I still have are the microscope slides, which I use to flatten reeds (for my clarinet and saxophone).
Munchkin bobblehead, next to the microscope. Munchkin is a card game that parodies D & D. I have enjoyed it with several groups of friends. When I went to buy it for myself, the only edition they had was the "bobblehead edition," so I wound up with this nifty bobblehead.
Shotglass and ceramic cat figurine, below the bobblehead. These were both gifts from my first and only serious girlfriend. The cat figurine was for christmas, and was accompanied by a donation to an animal charity in my name. She's quite passionate about animals; I believe she's currently an animal conservation worker. The shotglass was a gift she brought back from a month abroad in Costa Rica. I broke up with her right before she left for that trip, so I can only imagine she bought it for me as a show of goodwill - which, unfortunately, I squandered, because I tried obsessively to get back together with her after she returned (turns out I didn't get over her while she was gone), even though she'd moved on and was being courted by another guy she wound up dating for a couple years. Ah, to be young and stupid again gag vomit.
Two rocks, below the ex's gifts. Yup. Rocks. One of them (the gray one) is a perfect skipping stone that I found in the Truckee river (in the Lake Tahoe area of California). It's literally perfect: perfectly round, or so near that the human eye cannot spot the imperfections, and of uniform width. I've had it for probably a decade, because to skip it would mean to lose it. The other one is a semi-polished agate-like thing with the word "friends" engraved on it. It was a gift from some of my family's oldest friends at my Eagle Scout court of honor.
Metronome, the funky pyramid-shaped wooden antique thing. This is an old clockwork metronome that belonged to my grandma. My grandma succumbed ungracefully over a period of about ten years to either severe dementia or Alzheimer's disease. She wasn't able to live by herself any longer; at first, my family hired in-home caretakers for her, but she was a very strong-willed and independent woman, and took a perverse pride in driving the caretakers away. Eventually it was decided that she needed to be moved into a full-time care home. We were visiting over christmas one year after this had been decided, and she was aware of the decision. My cousins gave her a framed picture of themselves for her new room. It was a thoughtful gift, but the end of her independent life saddened her deeply. In her confusion and sadness, she somehow thought that "the bus" was coming right that instant to take her away to the nursing home, and she started trying to give away all of her belongings to her collected family members. The metronome is what she tried to give me. When she passed away several years later, and my parents asked if there was anything from among her estate that my brothers or I were particularly interested in, I naturally asked for the metronome.
Gold-painted wooden spoon with tag, below the metronome. An award I won for "healthiest dessert" at a dessert cook-off with friends. The dessert in question was chocolate chip poppyseed banana bread.
Arrow pen, barely visible atop the spoon. I won this at summer camp with the Boy Scouts one year for taking third place in a camp-wide archery competition. I had a serious knack for archery, somehow, and I've considered buying my own gear and adopting it as a hobby on-and-off ever since.
Finally, ridiculous wooden sculpture of mouth with flame on the tongue, on the far right. The inscription reads, "It's not that hot sauce award." I got this another year at summer camp with the Boy Scouts. We were making tacos in our campsite, and somebody brought a condiment called "Dumbass Hot Sauce." As someone who had eaten raw Habanero, I said, "It can't be that hot," and applied it liberally to my taco. This award was hand-crafted by my scoutmaster to commemorate the hilarity that ensued.

Also visible, but not part of the collection:
Two dead C-cell batteries that I really need to remember to take to campus for recycling.
Red gumball machine. It was a dumpster-diving prize.
Glass lamp filled with beer bottlecaps. This lamp was actually another item from among my grandma's effects. Right now it's filled with three years worth of beer bottlecaps; filling it is on ongoing project. And, when that project is completed, I have another identical lamp that I get to start on!
A couple books. Of course I have books. Tons of them. Also visible next to the books is the very top of an incredibly shiny bookmark, which was part of another one of my godparents' educational gifts, this one a little science kit about the reflection and refraction of light. It might actually be older than the microscope.
Blue towel tacked onto the wall. I've always been too lazy to hang an actual curtain rod in my apartment bedroom, so I have several towels tacked over the window instead, because I am both resourceful and a classy motherfucker.
 

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I was kind of lol about your long, comprehensive list of your hoarding items and the stories behind them :tongue:.


I am way too lazy right now to write much about my past and present hoarding, but yeah, I definitely have (and have always kept) nostalgic items with me even in my tiny peanut-sized room, many that I've been hanging onto since childhood. I kept almost all of my toys from childhood until I moved out (to got to college) because getting rid of them was kinda hard beforehand (by that point I'd just gotten over it a lot more). On top of keeping nostalgic things, I've also had a way of keepin' other things, crap or not, just because they could be useful as a tool eventually or as something I'll want to use again someday.
 

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I'm going running so I don't have time right this second to go through my lists, but I'm a packrat and used to hoard everything -- small trinkets from people, toys from my past, pictures and things I wrote as a kid, rocks I would collect when visiting meaningful places. I even save chats I've had with people online + all the e-mails I ever sent.

I remember at one point I was collecting rubber erasers from my trips to the dentist as a child, and a lot of little blue rubber smurfs (the collectibles from back in the 80's).

Probably what I value most is my collection of physical notes and letters from my kids or my ex or friends that I found meaningful. I keep them all in a special box so that I don't lose them.
 

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Yeah... I don't do... that.

There is truth in stereotypes, and I'm a caricature of a lot of INTP stereotypes, but this is one of the few that don't apply to me. Though it takes me a long time to work up the motivation to do it, I occasionally go through everything I own (which isn't much) and purge every item that no longer serves a purpose in my life.

I do feel a small bit of hesitation with each item, but the drive to "clean" myself and have as few possessions to keep track of as possible easily overwhelms that hesitation. I rarely attach sentimental value to objects, but I often think I might find a use for and should therefore keep any random, unneeded item I come across. As I said, this usually doesn't stop me.

I feel purified when it's done.

Of course, I barely mind if my room looks like it survived an explosion because of all the crap strewn randomly about it - as long as I need all of that crap. Any hoarding stash I have only exists because I've been too lazy and have gone far too long without purging my junk. If I could program robots to do it for me every week, I would.

Hm. *begins scheming*


Blue towel tacked onto the wall
. I've always been too lazy to hang an actual curtain rod in my apartment bedroom, so I have several towels tacked over the window instead, because I am both resourceful and a classy motherfucker.
Woah... what shade of blue is it? I have a blue blanket over mine. The window has blinds, but they're pretty messed up and broken, and they never kept the light out enough to allow me to sleep when the sun is up to begin with. There's a small galaxy of pinholes above the window from all the times I've taken it down and put it back up.
 

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From "An INTP Profile" by Paul James (read and discuss it in this thread):


When I was evaluating whether or not I might be INTP, this characteristic was one of the most surprising. Prior to reading it, I had a tendency to never think of NT-temperament types as sentimental, but Si is apparently "sentimentality incarnate," and so it's not surprising for a tertiary-Si-using INTP to have a bit of a mawkish streak. Surprising - and also vindicating, because I've been doing this exact thing for longer than I can remember. At least a couple other of the INTPs here have said they do the same thing, and one expressed an interest in talking about it with relative strangers.

So, ITT: do you have a hoard? If you do, would you show it to us and/or talking about it a bit? It could be a fun way to get to know your fellow PerC INTPs a bit better.



This is the currently visible portion of my collection. The first thing to note is that I did not pose it for this picture. It sits like this on my dresser at all times. Occasionally, if the items are collecting too much dust, I'll clean them and put them all back in a different order. Visible in this picture:

American Flag, top left. I was awarded this flag at my Eagle Scout court of honor.
Black Belt, just below the flag. I became a black belt in taekwondo at 14 years old, in a very recreational, non-traditional class. I stopped taking taekwondo at age 16, and am no longer worthy of the title "black belt."
Small stack of tags and notes, including Pokemon card, just left of center. These are short notes mostly from appreciative dance partners. I've been a ballroom dancer for the last four years, and many of my partners have given me small gifts (chocolate bars and the like) with notes attached just before big showcase performances. The chocolate, obviously, doesn't last, but the notes, I save. The pokemon card was given to me by my youngest cousin last summer. He's by far the youngest kid in our family (my aunt remarried and had another child). Last summer, my parents and I visited his family, and he gave me this pokemon card. It's "Fossil" - a trainer card which isn't all that great in the game (I used to collect these and play the game when I was younger); but I don't think he realized I knew that, and I thought it was touching for him to try to share his interests with me that way.
Pumpjack button, on top of the stack of notes and things. Part of my costume from my very first solo dance showcase routine, in which I play an uptight hipster protester who falls victim to and is perverted by a beautiful Big Oil woman. Halfway through the routine, my partner rips off my plaid flannel shirt to reveal yuppy business attire beneath, signaling the completion of my transformation. The button actually fell off both times I performed the routine.
 

Uptight hipster.

Freshly transformed big oil shill.

If this dance routine sounds pretentious, it really wasn't; it was all very tongue-in-cheek.

Fake flowers, above the button. A friend gave these to me at a valentines-day (ballroom) dance, saying they complemented my outfit.
Armadillo beany baby in a chinese takeout box, above the fake flowers/stack of notes/pumpjack button. This is one of the oldest items I have. It was a going-away gift from my friends when I moved from Oregon to Washington after my freshman year of high school. It's an inside joke: most of my friends were part of the music program at my first high school, and the music department went on a trip to San Francisco that year for a competition. While we were there, we did a few touristy things, among which was visiting SF's chinatown. For some reason, I thought I would be able to find a stuffed armadillo in one of the shops, and became determined to buy one as a souvenir.
Vitamin Water bottle with birthday inscription, next to the ridiculous armadillo. This was a bottle of special 21st-birthday vitamin water that one of my friends mixed for me. It was one of my first legal drinks.
Chocolate box, below the water bottle. A box that contained chocolate at a combined wine-and-chocolate tasting at the Castello di Amoroso winery in Napa Valley, CA. Some of my dance friends and I went on a wine-tasting tour in the area before the biggest formal ball event that our ballroom studio puts on each year.
Normal salt shaker and decorative steller's jay pepper shaker, next to the chocolate box. Two of my favorites. The salt shaker was a "gift" from a woman I dated a couple years back. On our first date, she was showing off her sleight of hand at dinner. She made the salt shaker disappear, and, in a true display of dedication, only revealed it as I was driving her home hours later, by fake-surreptitiously slipping it into the cupholder. When I got her home, she lured me to her door under the guise of showing me her cactus garden, then looked me in the eye with a smile on her face and flat-out asked me if she could kiss me. You know the way they describe the kiss at the end of The Princess Bride? It was one of those. After a half-hour or so of that, we parted, and she gave me the salt shaker as a gift. For our next date, I bought a pair of decorative bluejay salt and pepper shakers, and presented her the salt shaker, while I kept the pepper shaker for myself.
 

They fit together with magnets. I'm a sappy motherfucker sometimes.

Unfortunately, things didn't work out. That first date is still the best one I've ever been on, and I've never clicked with another person as quickly or easily as I did with her. I would not hesitate to predict that I'd have put a ring on her by now if things had lasted.
Microscope, above the salt and pepper shakers. The item I've had the longest - probably almost twenty years now. My godparents used to get me gifts for my birthday, and they were always educational or scientific. This microscope was part of a whole junior-science set. The only other part of the set I still have are the microscope slides, which I use to flatten reeds (for my clarinet and saxophone).
Munchkin bobblehead, next to the microscope. Munchkin is a card game that parodies D & D. I have enjoyed it with several groups of friends. When I went to buy it for myself, the only edition they had was the "bobblehead edition," so I wound up with this nifty bobblehead.
Shotglass and ceramic cat figurine, below the bobblehead. These were both gifts from my first and only serious girlfriend. The cat figurine was for christmas, and was accompanied by a donation to an animal charity in my name. She's quite passionate about animals; I believe she's currently an animal conservation worker. The shotglass was a gift she brought back from a month abroad in Costa Rica. I broke up with her right before she left for that trip, so I can only imagine she bought it for me as a show of goodwill - which, unfortunately, I squandered, because I tried obsessively to get back together with her after she returned (turns out I didn't get over her while she was gone), even though she'd moved on and was being courted by another guy she wound up dating for a couple years. Ah, to be young and stupid again gag vomit.
Two rocks, below the ex's gifts. Yup. Rocks. One of them (the gray one) is a perfect skipping stone that I found in the Truckee river (in the Lake Tahoe area of California). It's literally perfect: perfectly round, or so near that the human eye cannot spot the imperfections, and of uniform width. I've had it for probably a decade, because to skip it would mean to lose it. The other one is a semi-polished agate-like thing with the word "friends" engraved on it. It was a gift from some of my family's oldest friends at my Eagle Scout court of honor.
Metronome, the funky pyramid-shaped wooden antique thing. This is an old clockwork metronome that belonged to my grandma. My grandma succumbed ungracefully over a period of about ten years to either severe dementia or Alzheimer's disease. She wasn't able to live by herself any longer; at first, my family hired in-home caretakers for her, but she was a very strong-willed and independent woman, and took a perverse pride in driving the caretakers away. Eventually it was decided that she needed to be moved into a full-time care home. We were visiting over christmas one year after this had been decided, and she was aware of the decision. My cousins gave her a framed picture of themselves for her new room. It was a thoughtful gift, but the end of her independent life saddened her deeply. In her confusion and sadness, she somehow thought that "the bus" was coming right that instant to take her away to the nursing home, and she started trying to give away all of her belongings to her collected family members. The metronome is what she tried to give me. When she passed away several years later, and my parents asked if there was anything from among her estate that my brothers or I were particularly interested in, I naturally asked for the metronome.
Gold-painted wooden spoon with tag, below the metronome. An award I won for "healthiest dessert" at a dessert cook-off with friends. The dessert in question was chocolate chip poppyseed banana bread.
Arrow pen, barely visible atop the spoon. I won this at summer camp with the Boy Scouts one year for taking third place in a camp-wide archery competition. I had a serious knack for archery, somehow, and I've considered buying my own gear and adopting it as a hobby on-and-off ever since.
Finally, ridiculous wooden sculpture of mouth with flame on the tongue, on the far right. The inscription reads, "It's not that hot sauce award." I got this another year at summer camp with the Boy Scouts. We were making tacos in our campsite, and somebody brought a condiment called "Dumbass Hot Sauce." As someone who had eaten raw Habanero, I said, "It can't be that hot," and applied it liberally to my taco. This award was hand-crafted by my scoutmaster to commemorate the hilarity that ensued.

Also visible, but not part of the collection:
Two dead C-cell batteries that I really need to remember to take to campus for recycling.
Red gumball machine. It was a dumpster-diving prize.
Glass lamp filled with beer bottlecaps. This lamp was actually another item from among my grandma's effects. Right now it's filled with three years worth of beer bottlecaps; filling it is on ongoing project. And, when that project is completed, I have another identical lamp that I get to start on!
A couple books. Of course I have books. Tons of them. Also visible next to the books is the very top of an incredibly shiny bookmark, which was part of another one of my godparents' educational gifts, this one a little science kit about the reflection and refraction of light. It might actually be older than the microscope.
Blue towel tacked onto the wall. I've always been too lazy to hang an actual curtain rod in my apartment bedroom, so I have several towels tacked over the window instead, because I am both resourceful and a classy motherfucker.
I do hoard trinkets but about once a year I go through my closet and throw it all out. I don't like clutter. I think my biggest hoard right now is the bundles of makeup and toiletries overtaking my bathroom counter...!
 
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I don't have too much stuff here, since I moved away 8 months ago and still have a lot of stuff at my father's house. I do have tons of maps--hiking maps, skiing maps, and road maps. Also have a lot of little stuff: lift tickets, trail maps, magazines, 30 or so super balls, and 4 calculators. Don't get me started on the books I bought and never have (probably never will) read.

At my dad's house though, I've got 3 pairs of old skis (a couple seasons ago I decided I'd keep my slalom skis and sell them after I go to the Olympics :tongue:), 3 or 4 bikes I had growing up, beanie babies, and random shit I find in the woods. I've found so much back there, from dysfunctional hunting rifles to car parts.

I don't think I'm really that much of a hoarder though. I keep everything for practical reasons. I could use parts from a rifle or cars and bikes to build something, and if I move back in with him and have time I probably will. Sometimes I like to look at my maps and just plot out routes that look fun. Some of the stuff is more so when I'm 80 and the guys from American Pickers come around, or rather desperately trying to sell it at flea markets.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I was kind of lol about your long, comprehensive list of your hoarding items and the stories behind them :tongue:.
I talk a lot about myself when I feel that someone might interested in listening. :p It's a long-time lead-by-example strategy of mine: maybe if I talk about myself, they'll talk about themself.

Probably what I value most is my collection of physical notes and letters from my kids or my ex or friends that I found meaningful. I keep them all in a special box so that I don't lose them.
My box says "Memories, Good, Bad & Otherwise" on it. I just went through it and threw a bunch of it out; things like old homecoming tickets, lift tickets, and nametags from events I don't even remember most of anymore. Didn't chuck out the neatly folded and numbered letters from my first high school girlfriend, though.

Woah... what shade of blue is it? I have a blue blanket over mine. The window has blinds, but they're pretty messed up and broken, and they never kept the light out enough to allow me to sleep when the sun is up to begin with. There's a small galaxy of pinholes above the window from all the times I've taken it down and put it back up.
Navy blue, and there are actually three of them, of differing colors. I rarely take them down except to wash them from time to time. Fortunately, I found a clever way to open my "curtains" without having to pull them off the wall.

My situation's pretty much exactly the same: those blinds are really crappy, and I sleep best in total darkness.
 

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Protip: Tape a garbage bag over the window (you may need more than one to cover the area) it works amazingly. :kitteh:
 

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I love nostalgia. I keep a few items, mainly personal things. I always keep text messages too and I make sure my phone doesn't delete them. Sometimes I just go through my phone and look at the pictures and read texts from like a year ago and I love the nostalgia. I have a mini hair clip one of my friends gave me 2 years ago, a couple notes from kids at school. Even a note from a secret admirer lol. I keep all my notes from high school, and by notes I mean random drawings. Here is a pic of one from precalc 2 years ago lol
randomdrawing.jpg

But yea text messages and even sometimes I'll find old posts on facebook, those are probably the biggest ones. So I'm more of a digital hoarder I guess lol.
 

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Yeah ummm...

I have 66 pairs of pants and jeans, does that count as a hoard?
Hahhahah. I have 0 pairs of jeans. I live in florida so I don't see a need, but I hate them anyway.
 
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I can't really think of anything that would count as nostalgic. I think I have a book that one of my GFs gave me years ago, but I only still have it because I never got around to reading it. I have a few metro passes from various cities I've been to, I guess that might qualify (though I purge them once the stored value expires).

I remember my past, so keeping items around doesn't seem useful for me. Same reason I don't take picture when I travel. If my memory is good, I don't need the items. If my memory fails, the items are just reminders of things I've forgotten. Either way, I don't have any reason to keep them.
 

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I relate 100%. I have so much stuff that I can't get rid of since it reminds me of some memory, person or place I want to keep close to me. I wouldn't call myself a hoarder, though, since it all fits in my room and it's not a total mess... but I rarely add to it so I guess it's stable enough. I kinda want to get rid of a lot of it, though, since while memories can be nice, they can be burdens at times, too, though I doubt I'd get rid of much xD /dies

I have various collections that are full of personal value and worth nothing in terms of monetary value, so the only options are to keep them or throw it away. For example, I like to collect rocks from everywhere I visit, especially volcanic rocks since I'm trying to pursue a degree in volcanology. They look like normal rocks to everyone else but to me, they are significant and are a piece of active geologic history. I also still keep old, favorite toys from childhood, and other random trinkets from moments and events in life. They are a nice comfort and carry meaning for me.

Thanks for the post. Here it was, I thought I was extremely weird for being so sentimental over material objects since nobody else I know does the same. I'm always told to throw everything out because I "don't need it anymore" xD Maybe I don't "need" it per se... but I do like having them. I'm a very sentimental person. I'm not sure how much it's type related since there's a lot of INTPs here saying they don't experience it, but I wonder if life experiences play a big part in it as well. I've had to move around a lot and forced to leave people and places I loved throughout my childhood, then returning to those places later to visit... they've totally changed. Somehow, an object being linked to those places makes my memory more "real". Sometimes memories feel more like dreams than real life, and perhaps those objects reassure me it was real after all.
 

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@geekofalltrades: Oh I'm sorry, I didn't mean to sound like a jerk :/, lol. I thought your "list" was interesting though, I felt like I related to your ways a lot.

I used to collect all kinds of stuff as a kid in particular, and I still essentially do it as an adult, except I'm more conscientious of space and the power the look of my environment can have on me (I try to be a little more selective of what's on display around me), and I've just become less emotionally attached to objects as links the past (I guess, if that makes sense).

I had a glass bottle from some cheap fruit drink on my nightstand (it's packed up somewhere now) I had when I went to Vegas and met some long-lost family members again for the first time since I was a child. Some flowers from my 15th birthday dried up well in their vase, still in-tact with faded colors at this point, and I've kept them out since. Same with a vase of flowers from my Granny a few years ago, and a small house tree/shrub I was given when I moved to college -- all their dead-asses are on display in my room. I've held on to this little picture book that my old best friend drew me in middle school, I think. I still drink out of this water bottle I was given at age 12, and I mean I've done it almost everyday since.

I've held on to movie tickets, too. A banana plaque some friends got from Goodwill as a game prize at their party that I won is out in my room. Instead of buying souvenirs from trips, I've taken things like flowers (to dry) among other things as keepsakes. I took a demented babydoll head from a Haunted House at Busch Gardens during their Halloween special one year. Etc, etc; I could go on about crap. I did all of these behaviors more as a kid, collecting whatever caught my eye (like some junk off the sidewalk) or had any vague interest (little toys from the dentist, for example, as mentioned by someone else). I've always held on to some objects as "past links."

As I also said, I've also collected/held on to things, seeming bits of junk because or things I'm just not using, because I've thought it could have potential use later on, mostly as a kid and still as an adult but not nearly as hard. I never liked to throw out broken things to replace them as a kid -- I would rather try and duct tape things into place before tossing it. I think my emotional attachment to the object by then had something to do with it, that and replacing things usually means using other "resources" (I think this was partly my Sp-dominance just coming into some play at that age, if you've read about instinctual variants). Ugh, sadly I had so much shit in my room that my mother would get stressed out just walking in there, then she'd try to sneakily throw some out, but I'd notice.

Still don't feel like going on much now, and I think the point has been delivered enough, lol.
 

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I hoard books, especially if they helped me get through a rough time. Also cards with messages I want to keep.

I also hoard items I pick up from different vacations - little things like postcards, stamps, and brochures. I always tell myself I'll do something with them - like make a fun "summary" scrapbook, but I never do. I'm not crafty, and I'm too lazy.

Last week, I trashed the "brochures" collection. I knew that I'd never use it so there was no point in keeping it around.
 
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