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Discussion Starter #1
Just curious if any of our SJ's were active in the Greek system during college?

If yes, did you enjoy your time? Would you do it again? Would you encourage your children to rush?

If no, do you feel like you "missed out"? Would you encourage your children to rush?

If you aren't of college age yet, do you plan on joining a fraternity/sorority?

Thanks!
 

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Just curious if any of our SJ's were active in the Greek system during college?

-Never have and never will. I don't think you could pay me to join a sorority.



If no, do you feel like you "missed out"? Would you encourage your children to rush?

- No I don't feel like I missed out at all. I go to a pretty social university and it is not necessary to join a cult to have friends. I would neither encourage nor discourage my children to rush. It would be their choice... who knows I might have ESxx kids.
 

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I took part in an LGBTA sorority - it was very informal, and I really enjoyed it. It wasn't much like a typical sorority - we studied together, ate pizza, and supported the gay community on campus. I regret that I transferred colleges because I really liked the girls that were involved. Good people to hang with.
 
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Just curious if any of our SJ's were active in the Greek system during college?

If yes, did you enjoy your time? Would you do it again? Would you encourage your children to rush?

If no, do you feel like you "missed out"? Would you encourage your children to rush?

If you aren't of college age yet, do you plan on joining a fraternity/sorority?

Thanks!
I don't plan on joining a fraternity. I really see no point in joining. However, the Greek scene at the college I'm going to go to plays a very BIG role in the college social scene (Almost half of the male population joins fraternities while almost half of the female population joins sororities.).
 

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Lol .. I don't follow, i lead.
 
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I don't really get these things, living in the UK - societies are what you hear about in universities here; basically clubs for anyone to join who has an interest and the time to take part.

Societies can be on anything from ping pong to (video) gaming to theatre and so forth.

I'm not sure I like the sound of what's on the wiki - degrading tasks, exclusion, so much drinking your grades drop etc.
 

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I'm in Tau Beta Sigma, which is a music sorority focusing on the band. Going into college I said nononono I'm never rushing a sorority (my school is known for being mostly Greek....) Band has been a big part of my life for years, so to find a group of girls with common interest excited me. I did my research, thoroughly, in consideration of joining. Being a Type 4 I loathed the idea of being another "sorority girl," but TBS is so different. None of those rules on what you have to wear, no hazing. We don't do those on-campus party events either. We strictly focus on promoting the band and the joy of music to others.

The only way I would join was if I knew my individuality wouldn't be compromised, and it certainly hasn't. It's also nice to know we have a set mission and goal rather than simply existing for social purposes....
 

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Just curious if any of our SJ's were active in the Greek system during college?

If yes, did you enjoy your time? Would you do it again? Would you encourage your children to rush?

If no, do you feel like you "missed out"? Would you encourage your children to rush?

If you aren't of college age yet, do you plan on joining a fraternity/sorority?

Thanks!
I actually hated the idea of "Frats" and avoided them like the plague my first year in college. Early in the fall semester a friend I made in class asked me to come over that night to play poker. I showed up and everyone I met was awesome and I had a great time. It wasn't until the end of the night did I discover that it was a rush event. I became the president of my pledge class, held a number of positions including president of my chapter, and I am now a very active alumnus.

I enjoyed every second I was active, and now that I'm an alumnus I try to spend time with my chapter whenever I'm available. I'd encourage my children to be active in school whether it be greek or some other academic organization. The worst thing you can do in college is miss out on the college experience. Get an education, and have as much fun as humanly possible!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I enjoyed every second I was active, and now that I'm an alumnus I try to spend time with my chapter whenever I'm available.
Thanks, Splitty!

Do you feel that your involvement and the connections you made have benefited you in your post-college life, professionally?
 

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Do you feel that your involvement and the connections you made have benefited you in your post-college life, professionally?
My involvement has helped me in the social aspect more than with professional connections. I think a trait of being an ESTJ is the overwhelming need to be productive...all.the.time. Its pretty annoying actually...anyways. I started working 30+ hours a week when I was 16, and full time through college. So when I graduated I just kept working for my current company, just at a higher responsibility level. I have tons of connections through my Fraternity, I just don't have a use for them at this time. Mayor Jerry Sanders of San Diego is an alumnus that I keep in touch with along with 5 other CEO's of large financial institutions in the Southern California region that I could tap into if need be. Several recent grads from my chapter are gainfully employed through these connections.

Perhaps I missed the intent of your original post. Are you thinking about joining a greek organization?
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
My involvement has helped me in the social aspect more than with professional connections. I think a trait of being an ESTJ is the overwhelming need to be productive...all.the.time. Its pretty annoying actually...anyways. I started working 30+ hours a week when I was 16, and full time through college. So when I graduated I just kept working for my current company, just at a higher responsibility level. I have tons of connections through my Fraternity, I just don't have a use for them at this time. Mayor Jerry Sanders of San Diego is an alumnus that I keep in touch with along with 5 other CEO's of large financial institutions in the Southern California region that I could tap into if need be. Several recent grads from my chapter are gainfully employed through these connections.

Perhaps I missed the intent of your original post. Are you thinking about joining a greek organization?
Oh no, I'm out of college. I imagine that chapter meetings would throw a wrench into my carpool duties. :wink:

I had just finished reading Pledged: The Secret Life of Sororities and was curious about several points the author made.

One point in particular was that several alumni reported that their sorority experience, while being a fantastic network of social connections, didn't really benefit their post-collegiate professional life. I wondered if that held true for fraternity alumni, too. (You know, the whole stereotypical thought that men are occupationally driven, while females are relationally driven...)

I wasn't Greek and I have always wondered how I could have benefited from joining.

The professional connections you have made are quite impressive. May I ask what line of work you are in? Do you know if any of your co-workers are/were Greek?
 

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One point in particular was that several alumni reported that their sorority experience, while being a fantastic network of social connections, didn't really benefit their post-collegiate professional life. I wondered if that held true for fraternity alumni, too. (You know, the whole stereotypical thought that men are occupationally driven, while females are relationally driven...)

I wasn't Greek and I have always wondered how I could have benefited from joining.

The professional connections you have made are quite impressive. May I ask what line of work you are in? Do you know if any of your co-workers are/were Greek?
I never really understood sororities myself. They were so backstabbing and fake to each other that I wondered how they got so many girls to rush every semester. The girls that I still talk to aren't really doing much. Two girls are going for PhD's in biology, and another in Psychology. The rest are still working as nanny's, waitressing, or are unemployed. It might be something to do with the degrees they earned in college: arts, communications and human development seem to be the most common major the girls had. The ones who are successful earned degrees in business, science or engineering. Perhaps this has something to do with the lack of professional benefit.

I am a database administrator / general techie nerd for an engineering consulting firm. Didn't go to college for it, just started off as a temp when I was in college and after a year being a temp they couldn't bear to let me go so they hired me.
 

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It might be something to do with the degrees they earned in college: arts, communications and human development seem to be the most common major the girls had. The ones who are successful earned degrees in business, science or engineering. Perhaps this has something to do with the lack of professional benefit.
That's a very good point. I hadn't considered this.

Thanks for letting me pick your brain!
 
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