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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've written short stories already and now that I'm writing a novel I thought of a great idea. I did the personality test putting myself in the mind of my main protagonist and my main antagonist. This is what I got.

Hero: ISFP-B
Villain: ISTP-A

Very interesting. I love how my villain is both an introvert and an A type. He's such a fascinating character. For those of you that are writing, this is a great idea and definitely gives you some insight into the characters you're creating.
 

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What are the letters put after the type and the dash?
 

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Instead of taking personality tests after coming up with my characters, I actually base my characters on MBTI types. My main character has multiple personalities (INFP and ESTJ) and is currently an ESTJ in the chapter that I wrote today. The other heroes in his party are an ISTJ, an ESTP, and an ENFJ. Most of the villains they fight are NTJs, some of the weaker villains are ISFPs, and some of the more lawful villains are ENFPs.
 

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Maid of Time
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With my stories, I either write it on the fly or if I get stuck / it gets too complicated, I'll try to logically map it out. My problem is I tend to get caught up in world-building and making sure all the pieces hang together (like, world architecture), and not finish the story. But basically "broad view" + anchor points (events, places), and then trying to let the characters do what they do in the moment.

I have a decent sense of the character (look and feel) and sometimes an MBTI sense, but I've found that trying to adhere too strictly to MBTI type or some other type makes the character stilted. I think it's great to help me with the broad sense of the character, but after I start writing, I let the character come alive and speak for itself. Otherwise you run the risk of getting cookie-cutter characters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What are the letters put after the type and the dash?
A type or B type. In real life I'm an A type introvert for example. I'd much rather be alone but I have no problem socializing with others, in fact I talk a bit too much. When I'm in my group of like minded friends, I can talk all day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Nice to see other INTPs write books too. Can you post one paragraph here, to show how you write?
I really don't want to. I'm very secretive about what I write, not to mention self conscious about it. I let my best friend read ONE of my short stories and he said it was cool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
With my stories, I either write it on the fly or if I get stuck / it gets too complicated, I'll try to logically map it out. My problem is I tend to get caught up in world-building and making sure all the pieces hang together (like, world architecture), and not finish the story. But basically "broad view" + anchor points (events, places), and then trying to let the characters do what they do in the moment.

I have a decent sense of the character (look and feel) and sometimes an MBTI sense, but I've found that trying to adhere too strictly to MBTI type or some other type makes the character stilted. I think it's great to help me with the broad sense of the character, but after I start writing, I let the character come alive and speak for itself. Otherwise you run the risk of getting cookie-cutter characters.
I agree, don't get me wrong. I actually have my characters all mapped out, I just thought it would be a neat idea to see what kind of personality they have. When I'm writing, I get to know my characters like they are people.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I love the fact OP ended the subject line with an ellipsis...
Haha, yeah I don't know why I do that. On the interest I always use ellipses. I guess it seems like a natural chain of thought processes flowing together without breaking them up with a period or something. I really don't know.

For me, when I'm writing in a social environment, such as the internet or even a paper for school, I tend to write exactly how I speak. When I'm writing a book, I can't really do that, since each character has their own way of speaking anyway.
 

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Maid of Time
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I agree, don't get me wrong. I actually have my characters all mapped out, I just thought it would be a neat idea to see what kind of personality they have. When I'm writing, I get to know my characters like they are people.
Yeah my characters are like real people to me as well, I think of them as such.
 
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