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His quotes are awesome. I don't know a lot about him himself because I don't get into stuff, but his quotes are some of my favorites. The second here I've used as a signature before.

"In addition to my numerous other acquaintances I have still one more intimate friend—my melancholy. In the midst of pleasure, in the midst of work, he beckons to me, calls me aside, even though I remain present bodily. My melancholy is the most faithful sweetheart I have had—no wonder that I return the love!"
Søren Kierkegaard

"There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn't true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true."
Søren Kierkegaard
 

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When I was near the end of high school, I randomly picked up a volume of Fear and Trembling and The Sickness Unto Death from my parents' bookshelf. I think one of them must have read it for school, as it came complete with doodles and odd marginal notes about students, classes, and instructors. (I think it was a second-hand student edition, so there's no telling who drew these.) Both books made a huge impression on me. Each time, the introduction by an editor or scholar was completely impenetrable, and I was afraid I wouldn't be able to make any sense of Kierkegaard's writing, but that was not the case. It's dense, difficult, and full of references to plays, literature, music, and myths that I had never heard of. But for all that, it was very rewarding. For the first time, I felt that Kierkegaard was someone who understood parts of my inner life that nobody else did, and I was not surprised that the ideas he was writing about can be expressed only with great difficulty and in a way that's often roundabout. These ideas are by their nature inward and deep, and defined by their infinite connections to one another rather than by connection to concrete details in the outer world.

I liked this one a lot, as much for its (deliberate, playful) obscurity as for the fact that it's actually meaningful and insightful:
“The self is a relation which relates itself to its own self, or it is that in the relation that the relation relates itself to its own self; the self is not the relation but that the relation relates itself to its own self.”
There are some quotes from Kierkegaard that seem a bit pithier and clearer, but it's often dangerous to take them at face value. He was someone who wrote not only as himself, but also as an army of pseudonyms who sometimes share his views, sometimes oppose them, and sometimes come at them from an odd angle. Moreover, the whole of a work often gives a rather different context from what you might assume when reading only a single quote. But here are some good ones:

Deep within every human being there still lives the anxiety over the possibility of being alone in the world, forgotten by God, overlooked among the millions and millions in this enormous household. One keeps this anxiety at a distance by looking at the many round about who are related to him as kin and friends, but the anxiety is still there, nevertheless, and one hardly dares think of how he would feel if all this were taken away.
To be a teacher does not mean simply to affirm that such a thing is so, or to deliver a lecture, etc. No, to be a teacher in the right sense is to be a learner. Instruction begins when you, the teacher, learn from the learner, put yourself in his place so that you may understand what he understands and the way he understands it.
 
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