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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Median Mothers Ages

1970
First born = 21.4
Second born = 24.1
Third born = 26.6

Average = 1943-1949 (Silents & Post-War Boomers)

1971
First born = 21.4
Second born = 24.2
Third born = 26.6

Average = 1944-1950 (Silents & Post-War Boomers)

1972
First born = 21.4
Second born = 24.4
Third born = 26.7

Average = 1945-1951 (Post-War Boomers)

1973
First born = 21.5
Second born = 24.5
Third born = 26.8

Average = 1946-1952 (Post-War Boomers)

1974
First born = 21.7
Second born = 24.6
Third born = 26.8

Average = 1947-1953 (Post-War Boomers)

1975
First born = 21.8
Second born = 24.7
Third born = 26.9

Average = 1948-1954 (Post-War Boomers)

1976
First born = 22.0
Second born = 24.9
Third born = 27.0

Average = 1948-1954 (Post-War Boomers)

1977
First born = 22.2
Second born = 25.0
Third born = 27.1

Average = 1949-1955 (Post-War Boomers)

1978
First born = 22.4
Second born = 25.1
Third born = 27.2

Average = 1950-1956 (Post-War Boomers & Jones)

1979
First born = 22.6
Second born = 25.3
Third born = 27.2

Average = 1951-1957 (Post-War Boomers & Jones)

1980
First born = 22.7
Second born = 25.4
Third born = 27.3

Average = 1952-1958 (Post-War Boomers & Jones)

1981
First born = 22.9
Second born = 25.5
Third born = 27.4

Average = 1953-1959 (Post-War Boomers & Jones)

1982
First born = 23.1
Second born = 25.7
Third born = 27.5

Average = 1954-1959 (Post-War Boomers & Jones)

1983
First born = 23.3
Second born = 25.9
Third born = 27.6

Average = 1955-1960 (Generation Jones)

1984
First born = 23.5
Second born = 26.1
Third born = 27.8

Average = 1956-1961 (Generation Jones)

1985
First born = 23.7
Second born = 26.3
Third born = 27.9

Average = 1957-1962 (Generation Jones)

1986
First born = 23.8
Second born = 26.4
Third born = 28.0

Average = 1957-1963 (Generation Jones)

1987
First born = 24.0
Second born = 26.6
Third born = 28.1

Average = 1958-1963 (Generation Jones)

1988
First born = 24.1
Second born = 26.7
Third born = 28.2

Average = 1959-1964 (Generation Jones)

1989
First born = 24.2
Second born = 26.8
Third born = 28.3

Average = 1960-1965 (Jones & Gen X)

1990
First born = 24.2
Second born = 26.9
Third born = 28.3

Average = 1961-1966 (Jones & Gen X)

1991
First born = 24.2
Second born = 27.0
Third born = 28.4

Average = 1962-1967 (Jones & Gen X)

1992
First born = 24.4
Second born = 27.1
Third born = 28.5

Average = 1963-1968 (Jones & Gen X)

1993
First born = 24.4
Second born = 27.2
Third born = 28.7

Average = 1964-1969 (Generation X)

1994
First born = 24.4
Second born = 27.4
Third born = 28.9

Average = 1965-1970 (Generation X)

1995
First born = 24.5
Second born = 27.5
Third born = 29.1

Average = 1965-1971 (Generation X)

1996
First born = 24.6
Second born = 27.6
Third born = 29.1

Average = 1966-1972 (Generation X)

1997
First born = 24.7
Second born = 27.6
Third born = 29.1

Average = 1967-1973 (Generation X)

1998
First born = 24.7
Second born = 27.6
Third born = 29.1

Average = 1968-1974 (Generation X)

1999
First born = 24.8
Second born = 27.7
Third born = 29.1

Average = 1969-1975 (Generation X)

2000
First born = 24.9
Second born = 27.7
Third born = 29.2

Average = 1970-1976 (Generation X)


Source = https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr51/nvsr51_01.pdf

What's your input on this? @SuperYoshi @jaderose23 @SharksFan99 @andrewu2005 @Riven @MissAlvira @NicoLynne
 

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Well you asked for my input. Realistically, the fact that Australia's median fertility is older doesn't change things. There would be thousands of '99er babies in the US who have parents who are around the same age as mine.
I do appreciate your input, I was just trying to continue the conversation. Sorry if I sounded condescending or something.
And yes, indeed there are lots of folks born in the late 90s that do have parents born in the early-mid 60s, especially in urban areas, but at the same time there are also a lot with parents born in the late 70s as well, especially among hispanics and mormons.
I'm just trying to reach a general consensus here, and trying to start a good and fascinating conversation. Whatever year personally your parents were born I have no authority over and I have no problem at all with it, I just wanted to initiate a good conversation.
 
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My parents are quite old and aren't really from the West, so it might be a bit different for me. I generally consider myself Gen Z because I don't relate as well to 2000s politics as I do with 2010s.
 

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I'm a 1999 born baby,and my mom born in 1964 so out of range haha.For your information, quite much of my classmates have 60's born dad and 70's born mom
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My friend born in '99 has Millenial parents born in the '80s.

Then I'm born in 2000, yet my parents are both born in the '60s LOL
Just out of question, is that kid from a very religious background?
I live in Colorado, which is right next door to LDS haven Utah, so we had plenty of mormon kids at my school, and plenty of them my age (b. late '97 early '98) have parents born in the mid-late 70s, some of them to teen parents. The hispanic kids for the most part at my school also tended to have younger parents, albeit not to the same degree as the mormon kids.

Most of my peers from school have parents born in the late 60s early 70s, including me (dad born 1969, mom born 1971).
 

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I'm a 2002er and my parents are core GenXers. Some people around my age have late Boomer parents (b. 1960-1964), while others my age have early Millennial parents (born around 1982). It varies and I don't think an average is accurate in this case. A median or mode would make more sense for this kind of thing...
 

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Just out of question, is that kid from a very religious background?
I live in Colorado, which is right next door to LDS haven Utah, so we had plenty of mormon kids at my school, and plenty of them my age (b. late '97 early '98) have parents born in the mid-late 70s, some of them to teen parents. The hispanic kids for the most part at my school also tended to have younger parents, albeit not to the same degree as the mormon kids.

Most of my peers from school have parents born in the late 60s early 70s, including me (dad born 1969, mom born 1971).
No, most people here in NZ aren't Religous so people like my friend who had teen parents aren't becasue they were religous, they just happened to have kids really early LOL. My parents are born in the mid 60's and I have two older sisters, so I guess they had to wait a little longer until they had me lol
 

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No, most people here in NZ aren't Religous so people like my friend who had teen parents aren't becasue they were religous, they just happened to have kids really early LOL. My parents are born in the mid 60's and I have two older sisters, so I guess they had to wait a little longer until they had me lol
What years were your sisters born?
Mine were born in 1993 and 1990, my mom was still a teen when she had my oldest sister (parents weren't even married when she was conceived, they were dating and a fling caused an accident. They got married before she was born though)
 

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Interesting. Those median birth ages are a bit younger than I have personally experienced. The range is crazy though so I suppose it would be difficult to ever get a point that reflects everybody. My dad just went to his high school reunion this weekend, class of '77, and I guess I am one of the youngest kids. He talked to one person with a 16yo daughter, and another with a 19yo granddaughter. Maybe there needs to be an expanded bell curve. It's also worth noting that those with very young parents often spend more time with their grandparents, ie: live with or are babysat with them, versus those with elderly grandparents.
 

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Interesting. Those median birth ages are a bit younger than I have personally experienced. The range is crazy though so I suppose it would be difficult to ever get a point that reflects everybody. My dad just went to his high school reunion this weekend, class of '77, and I guess I am one of the youngest kids. He talked to one person with a 16yo daughter, and another with a 19yo granddaughter. Maybe there needs to be an expanded bell curve. It's also worth noting that those with very young parents often spend more time with their grandparents, ie: live with or are babysat with them, versus those with elderly grandparents.
On the topic of grandparents, what you said is true.
My maternal grandparents were born in 1946 and 1947, and I lived with them for quite a while, along with my sisters and one of my cousins, as my father was a military guy and my mother was working as a Law Clerk and were too busy to raise three kids full hand.
Because of this I've always been very close to them, and I still visit them once a week to check up on them and make sure they are staying active.
Don't think I'd been as close with them if they were elderly, I actually still have two great-grandparents alive in their 90s, and though I do enjoy their company, I've never been particularly close to them.
 

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On the topic of grandparents, what you said is true.
My maternal grandparents were born in 1946 and 1947, and I lived with them for quite a while, along with my sisters and one of my cousins, as my father was a military guy and my mother was working as a Law Clerk and were too busy to raise three kids full hand.
Because of this I've always been very close to them, and I still visit them once a week to check up on them and make sure they are staying active.
Don't think I'd been as close with them if they were elderly, I actually still have two great-grandparents alive in their 90s, and though I do enjoy their company, I've never been particularly close to them.
Thanks for your insight, I've observed that happening often. My youngest grandmother is sixty years older than I am, Silent gen, and she babysat me every Wednesday, would take me to the beach, the playground, etc. She's 83 now and has zero problem getting around. My older Greatest Gen grandparents however, I would only really visit at their house, and when I was babysat, somebody else younger usually was there too. My cousins who are ten to fifteen years older than me would always hang out with them though. Maybe it wasn't just age at that point, but also that I was like grandkid #9 lol. I do foresee the idea of "elderly" starting much later with the Boomers though.
 

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Thanks for your insight, I've observed that happening often. My youngest grandmother is sixty years older than I am, Silent gen, and she babysat me every Wednesday, would take me to the beach, the playground, etc. She's 83 now and has zero problem getting around. My older Greatest Gen grandparents however, I would only really visit at their house, and when I was babysat, somebody else younger usually was there too. My cousins who are ten to fifteen years older than me would always hang out with them though. Maybe it wasn't just age at that point, but also that I was like grandkid #9 lol. I do foresee the idea of "elderly" starting much later with the Boomers though.
Hehehe..

One last fascinating thing I want to mention about grandparents is generations within a family.

Families with a tradition of having children at 30 are usually going to be three-generation families, with one being in their single digits to 20s while their parents are in their 30s-50s and grandparents in their 60s-80s.
The most interesting example of this is the McFly family from Back to the Future. George McFly was born in 1938, Marty in 1968, and Marty Jr. in 1998, and it is fascinating seeing the difference in their generations presented, and how they pass down roles as they grow from child to parent to grandparent, even though that example was only showed with George and Lorraine really.

Families with a tradition of having kids at 25 are likely to be four generation families if they have decent longevity, as when one is newborn their parents would be 25, grandparents 50, and great-grandparents 75. If they have decent longevity, the great-grandparents should be around to watch them grow up.

Families with a tradition of having kids at 20 are likely to be five generation families if they have decent longevity as one's great-great grandparents would be 80 when they are newborn and if they live well into their 90s could be around to watch them grow up.
 

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Hehehe..

One last fascinating thing I want to mention about grandparents is generations within a family.

Families with a tradition of having children at 30 are usually going to be three-generation families, with one being in their single digits to 20s while their parents are in their 30s-50s and grandparents in their 60s-80s.
The most interesting example of this is the McFly family from Back to the Future. George McFly was born in 1938, Marty in 1968, and Marty Jr. in 1998, and it is fascinating seeing the difference in their generations presented, and how they pass down roles as they grow from child to parent to grandparent, even though that example was only showed with George and Lorraine really.

Families with a tradition of having kids at 25 are likely to be four generation families if they have decent longevity, as when one is newborn their parents would be 25, grandparents 50, and great-grandparents 75. If they have decent longevity, the great-grandparents should be around to watch them grow up.

Families with a tradition of having kids at 20 are likely to be five generation families if they have decent longevity as one's great-great grandparents would be 80 when they are newborn and if they live well into their 90s could be around to watch them grow up.
The oldest generation I had was a great grandmother who died when I was 1
 

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Hehehe..

One last fascinating thing I want to mention about grandparents is generations within a family.

Families with a tradition of having children at 30 are usually going to be three-generation families, with one being in their single digits to 20s while their parents are in their 30s-50s and grandparents in their 60s-80s.
The most interesting example of this is the McFly family from Back to the Future. George McFly was born in 1938, Marty in 1968, and Marty Jr. in 1998, and it is fascinating seeing the difference in their generations presented, and how they pass down roles as they grow from child to parent to grandparent, even though that example was only showed with George and Lorraine really.

Families with a tradition of having kids at 25 are likely to be four generation families if they have decent longevity, as when one is newborn their parents would be 25, grandparents 50, and great-grandparents 75. If they have decent longevity, the great-grandparents should be around to watch them grow up.

Families with a tradition of having kids at 20 are likely to be five generation families if they have decent longevity as one's great-great grandparents would be 80 when they are newborn and if they live well into their 90s could be around to watch them grow up.
You mindreading, Sly? I was just thinking about the McFly family tonight...in all the random ass thoughts I have haha. But yeah the number of generations thing has actually been a hot topic in my family lately, since my mom's aunt is 94 and a great great great grandmother I think? My grandpa would've just turned 92, and my youngest cousin and oldest cousin once removed are both seventeen. There were some young people having kids but there is noo way we are hitting that lol. But it is crazy how it can accumulate. Even when I look back at my family tree, more ancestors than not were older and/or were about the youngest kids in the family. What others have done in less than a century, my line in some places has to go back to like 1840.
 

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Very interesting thread. I would say it sounds pretty accurate or about average. It also really varies honestly. I was raised by Gen Jones parents which does reflect the original post.

Some people have young parents while others have much older. I remember when I was in the 1st grade, one of my classmates mother was already in her 50s. Her siblings were a lot older than her. She was a surprise baby. I also went to school with kids who had very young parents, like they were only 14-15 years older.

You have people still in their 40s who already have kids in their early 30s! You can have a 17 year old kid who can have a parent in their early 60s. There are 16 year olds who have parents in their early 30s.
 

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Interesting. Those median birth ages are a bit younger than I have personally experienced. The range is crazy though so I suppose it would be difficult to ever get a point that reflects everybody. My dad just went to his high school reunion this weekend, class of '77, and I guess I am one of the youngest kids. He talked to one person with a 16yo daughter, and another with a 19yo granddaughter. Maybe there needs to be an expanded bell curve. It's also worth noting that those with very young parents often spend more time with their grandparents, ie: live with or are babysat with them, versus those with elderly grandparents.
Yes, this is true. Younger grandparents will have more time to help raise their grandchildren or see them grow up. Much older grandparents don't have the time, the health or mobility.
 
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