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You take hers. She takes yours. You swap? Or you both add like Mr. Taylor-Smith and Mrs. Smith-Taylor?

Maybe I am just being illiterate today, but I couldn't grasp this.
The latter! Two surnames, hyphenation in-between.

You're not being illiterate, English is not my native language. Sorry for the confusion *g*
 
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The latter! Two surnames, hyphenation in-between.

You're not being illiterate, English is not my native language. Sorry for the confusion *g*
Don't be sorry, and I do not think it is your English. I just did not imagine (1) it was possible and therefore (2) that a couple could do so.

You can hyphenate in Korea? We cannot in Japan.
 
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I think I'll most probably keep my name, unless he has a really great surname. Even then I'll have to think about it. It's just such a bloody hassle to change everything! If I have children they can have their dad's surname.
 

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Discussion Starter · #85 ·
I recommend that me and my wife will both adopt as a married surname 'Uberawesomeness' or possibly 'NTJatyou'.
Hemoglobin Uberawesomeness may be a little long when it comes to signing....

...Just saying.
 
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I took my husband's last name when I married -- I didn't even question whether or not I should -- but I have always presented myself as a Ms., not Mrs. or Miss, even during my brief time as a single adult. I have carried his name almost as long as I carried my maiden name.

If I ever remarry, I will likely keep my current name. At my age and professional level, I see no benefit to taking someone else's name (unless he's willing to make me a kept woman...).
 

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Don't be sorry, and I do not think it is your English. I just did not imagine (1) it was possible and therefore (2) that a couple could do so.

You can hyphenate in Korea? We cannot in Japan.
Aha, got it now. You were questioning the legal aspect.

I intend to get married in my girlfriend's country, that's where the hyphenation would work. (The marriage of a national conducted abroad is automatically recognized by Korean domestic law, too.)
As in Japan, we can't hyphenate - the additional difference is, a woman cannot take her husband's name, either. When couples marry, they keep their own separate names to the end.

Korea's one of the few countries in the world where women keep their own names even after marriage.
It's legally impossible for either spouse to change his/her surname, because no law exists that would enable a person to take on his/her partner's name.
(Modern historians saying that our historical tradition has always upheld the independence of women are spouting bullsh*t, IMO. My suspicion is that confucian value on the Male name has always prevailed; emphasis is placed on one's Father's name in Korea, as opposed to one's Husband's name in Japan.)

A change in the current law would probably wreak havoc on the traditional family registry, namely the record of lineage in possession of every family clan in this country. But one can speculate the possibilities since Family Law's one of the fastest-changing areas of legislation in this country, or so my professors tell me. When and if something like hyphenation ever happens in Korea, I'd probably be the first in the line in front of the City Hall with my papers.
 

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