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I am wondering what types are most likely to become teachers and what each type is most likely to teach. Please think back to high school and list the MBTI type of some of your teachers, what they taught, and their gender. Feel free to add a brief summary of what they were like.
Here's mine:

Latin: INTP female- she was super smart and socially awkward

Spanish: INFP male- extremely nice, he often went on long rants about the deepest and most random things

Spanish 2: ESFP male- really odd but really funny

Religion: ISTJ male- most students were scared of him, had a really dry, subtle sense of humor

Religion 2: INTP male- a lot more put together than my Latin teacher, really funny and was one of my favorite classes

Geometry: ISTJ female- she got super hung up on the most irrelevant details, I never liked her

Algebra 2: ESTP male- dry sense of humor, took about a week to grade tests but everyone loved him

Chemistry: ISFP male- very religious and understanding, didn't like to discipline kids

Psychology: INTx male- everything he does resembles an INTJ but he was super disorganized, there was stuff everywhere in his classroom

Speech: ESFJ female- she was just a really normal person

Biology:ENTJ male- SUPER enthusiastic and over the top with everything, very involved with the students and everyone loved him

U.S. History: ExFJ male- very charismatic and friendly, good at relating things and seeing connections which makes me think ENFJ
 

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I wouldn't venture a guess at the types of any of my teachers since they likely had their "I am at work" faces on, but I do know some people who teach/taught/wished they did/realized they hated it, etc.

ESTJ, ISTJ - both math teachers (also, since you wanted gender, both males)

ISTJ - orchestra teacher (female)

ENFP - tried to teach history, but wasn't very successful. Eventually gave up on teaching. Bafflingly, she never seemed to know or care much about history. Maybe that's part of why it didn't work.

ENFP - realized she hated teaching late in getting her Bachelor's degree and went on to get her Master's degree specifically to avoid teaching.

ENTJ - wished he'd been a professor of math or economics

ENFJ - not a professional, but always received the teaching calling in his church. Thoroughly loves to teach.

ENFJ - an Episcapalion minister. Very teachery in style. (male)
 

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I'm not good at judging others' personalities, especially when they're acting professional, but I'M a teacher, haha.

INFP - 3 years of middle school theater, 2 years of 5th grade (1 math, 1 reading/writing). My personality is a WAY better fit for elementary because of my goofy humor and kinda fragile ego (100% honesty here). Working with kids is so much better than adults - they're always so sincere and even when they kinda suck at least you know they've got growing to do. With adults that's just how they'll be forever probably.
 

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At first I thought Ti/Fe would be a good requirement to follow for teaching in general, but then again there's so damn many different crafts and arts that can be taught out there, that likely any type could become a good teacher. For example a good dance teacher would need to be substantially different from a good maths teahcer. But for a stereotypical school setting, having internal logical consistency, paired up with perpetual concern for the students' well-being and comprehension, would be the 2 essential requirements.

Back in my school days, I hated it when teachers made a half-assed job out of teaching, and even more so hated it when they made a half-assed job out of solving conflicts. They left students to their own devices. This kind of approach might work for talented students who merely need a push in the right direction to succeed, or for those who have great parents and aid them in reaching social maturity quicker. But those who genuinely struggle either out of lack of interest or lack of explanatory material, or due to lack of parental supervision, will suffer and potentially begin to hate the learning process as a whole. (or turn it into a nightmare for others)

Whenever I try to explain any idea, practice, craft to another person, I have a tendency to overdo it rather than do a half-assed job. I get personally invested into the person who seeks my advice, and I ensure that he becomes well equipped and armed to deal with his problem after my lesson, as though he is to represent/defend my dignity on the battlefield.

So if we were to treat elementary/middle/high school as a "school of life", then those supervising this school need to be Fe-ish in my opinion. Everything else comes second based on the exact subject that's being taught. While Te/Ti needs to be placed anywhere in the stack EXCEPT the bottom.
 
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