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Not exactly what you asked for but I’ll toss it out anyway. I’m retired and lovin’ it. Retirement is the adult version of the preschool years. You may recall that fun time in life when you were old enough to know what was going on and the day was yours to do with as you pleased. That time ended when someone required you to report to kindergarten for indoctrination and socialization. In retirement life is even better. And yes, I do sleep in when I choose and no, there is no alarm clock in my life.

But to be helpful, I held the same job for almost 30 years and loved what I did. That was the good part. The downside was not particularly caring for my employer or some of my co-workers. I just took the bad with the good, enjoyed the day to day when I could and tolerated all the rest.

I’ll just say I had a government job that frequently took me out of the country, sometimes for days, sometimes for years. All in all, I enjoyed the experience.

If anyone is bored at work it might be worthwhile to consider government employment. Whatever you do, never sell yourself short or underestimate your potential. Have the courage to dream and the wherewithal to act on your dreams. You might be surprised where you end up.
 

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ISFJ 6w7 sp/so
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  1. I do like it, most of the time.
  2. Yes, something that pays better and is more long term, a career.
  3. I would recommend it to anybody who has a good attitude, a good work ethic, and likes a physically active job that doesn't demand 24/7 availability.
  4. Better pay, is basically my only real complaint. Everything else is not that big in comparison.
 

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I have a job, and it's called: NEETing around.


(I'm still looking for a job and I'm fine, thank you very much).
 

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I'm just getting started with my career, but so far so good. I'm a building surveyor, not yet chartered, I haven't been out of uni long enough. For those unfamiliar with the job, it's sort of in between the work of an architect and a civil engineer. I was a little uncertain of what aspect of surveying and similar occupations I wanted to get into. Typical of a Ti type I've always liked knowing how things work and tinkering with them to see different results. My job also allows for some variety, it's not the same 9 to 5 in an office every day, which is great. The hours aren't over demanding either, so I have time for all my hobbies.

Would I rather do something else? Well, maybe some days, but no job is perfect. The great thing, again, is the variety. If it's tedium today, I might being doing an aspect of the job tomorrow I like a lot more.

Who should consider it? Anyone interested in similar occupations, like architecture or engineering should consider it.

What would I improve? Most of that would just be linked to experience, with that comes greater opportunities and higher pay.

Here is a video to give an example of the kind of work.
P.S. I love how they just randomly zoom in on his hand for no reason at 1:27. WTF?
 

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Sunset Stripper
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I like my job. For now it's good, but I'd like more responsibility and maybe doing something that pays a little more and is a little more interesting. I'd recommend it to people who want to do a good job and try to get along with people. I've worked with lots of people who just seem like they want to get people they don't like fired, and ascend by making others look bad, and they're just not good people to work with. I'd want to be compensated a bit more, and be given a bit more responsibilities / room for advancement much quicker than it's happening.
 

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1.Do you like it?
Love it!

2.Would you rather do something else, what?
Not right now, perhaps latter I'd like to retire to the countryside.

3.Who would you recommend it to, and who should not take your job?
Well, my job is highly qualified and demanding.

4.What would you change about your job to improve it?
Actually nothing. I'd just focus on taking better advantage of my free time.
 

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I can’t say for sure. My work is pretty good and brings me a lot of money, but I combine it with studies, so I get very tired.
 

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Stealth Warship
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I'm just getting started with my career, but so far so good. I'm a building surveyor, not yet chartered, I haven't been out of uni long enough. For those unfamiliar with the job, it's sort of in between the work of an architect and a civil engineer. I was a little uncertain of what aspect of surveying and similar occupations I wanted to get into. Typical of a Ti type I've always liked knowing how things work and tinkering with them to see different results. My job also allows for some variety, it's not the same 9 to 5 in an office every day, which is great. The hours aren't over demanding either, so I have time for all my hobbies.

Would I rather do something else? Well, maybe some days, but no job is perfect. The great thing, again, is the variety. If it's tedium today, I might being doing an aspect of the job tomorrow I like a lot more.

Who should consider it? Anyone interested in similar occupations, like architecture or engineering should consider it.

What would I improve? Most of that would just be linked to experience, with that comes greater opportunities and higher pay.

Here is a video to give an example of the kind of work.
P.S. I love how they just randomly zoom in on his hand for no reason at 1:27. WTF?
I'm £2.5k lighter to the tune of a surveyor - it's a good grift ypu've got going...
 
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1.Do you like it?

Yes. I work as a nurse and counselor in open rehabilitation, I make home visits for people who suffer from mental illnesses and substance abuse. I get to be creative, independent, and use problem solving skills simultaneously, and all three are important elements for me in order to feel I'm doing something meaningful personally.

2.Would you rather do something else, what?

There are days I wish I worked elsewhere doing simple tasks that require no deeper thinking, but I know in the long run it would make me numb-minded. My work is mentally draining and socially exhausting. After work, I have to withdraw in solitude, the work is hypersocial. You're interacting with someone nonstop, either patient or a co-worker or associates. You receive plenty phone calls during the day, especially if you're on call duty and carrying two phones, lmao.

3.Who would you recommend it to, and who should not take your job?

I'd recommend it for people who have the desire to help, but know how to distance themselves enough emotionally to not let their empathy take over, because people you meet are very sick mentally, psychotic without medication, suicidal, aggressive, even violent in worst cases, so it takes a certain character. You'd need to have the skill to leave work stuff behind, do not let it follow you home. You need to be open to communicate openly and honestly about your feelings, make sure you do not bottle it inside, because it will take a toll on you without you even noticing, until you burn out. You need education how to avoid phenomena such as surrogate traumatization, which is common. It takes a person who is interested to keep self-developing indefinitely.

You'd have to be able to stand the sight of blood and work in environment that includes quickly changing unexpected situations that require fast reactions and constant evaluation if the situation is safe for them and for you.

4.What would you change about your job to improve it?

Initial thought is less patients per worker, but it should be more workers per patients, because at this current rate, we do not have enough resources and time for each patient as individuals. They receive the absolute necessary, but not the interaction they require. For some people, our home visits to their place is the only contact they have to outside world currently. It's crucial to have enough time to make the encounter meaningful and process far reaching. My work ethics and motivation suffer sometimes, because I'm not able to provide what I consider to be the high quality.
 

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1.Do you like it?

I am a fashion design and production assistant. I only recently finished my course so my new job is still very new to me, still in the early learning stages. Prior I was a pharmacy assistant part-time while studying. :) I enjoyed both.

2.Would you rather do something else, what?


Hmm. There are many many things I am interested in. I mean, I started at psychology, then media. This is the only thing I actually committed to and graduated from, and it's been one of the most challenging. So I'd say I'm probably on the right path, regardless of my many many interests and passions and talents.

3.Who would you recommend it to, and who should not take your job?

I would recommend it to people who like a challenge. Who like to engage in practical skills and who don't mind having tight deadlines and being busy busy busy. I would recommend it also to someone with skills in fashion design, garment construction, the ability to measure and fill out a technical pack (spec sheet), good email skills, a hard-working attitude, the ability to think outside the box and problem solve, someone with great skills in photoshop, illustrator and basic excel. Some web development knowledge, or just working with a website back-end, also customer service skills because it's a small team so we do so many roles including retail if a customer comes in downstairs. Someone with a good aesthetic eye, who is able to make artworks for web banners, and edit photos for the site accordingly. It's a job which has many, many roles. From picking and packing, to technical illustrations, measuring specs, communicating with factories - creating marketing artworks, the list goes on. This is just so far, too. Someone who likes to do more than one task, rather than one focused thing would enjoy this. It's less monotonous.

People who expect it to be all about the creativity should avoid my job, as it's definitely more 'commercial', with old styles being re-made and tweaked slightly, because they are what sells. One would think someone like me who is sensitive would not suit such a job. But I am able to work despite my stress HAHA, freak of nature. I've already dealt with the worst kind of person, I'm sure I can take on anything now. XD Also, someone who wants to work in a large team, for a bigger company would avoid this role.


4.What would you change about your job to improve it?

Unsure as it's still early stages. I'm going to guess I will eventually want more room for creativity. In saying that, one of the reasons I was very drawn to this job is actually because of the external structure it would provide me. Having interviewed for a graphic design role recently where the 'boss' (who claimed he didn't even see himself as a 'boss' but just one of the employees) said that his workers can come in whenever they want or even work from home actually gave me anxiety. That's no good for someone who can lack self-discipline. I was more than happy to go for a 9 to 5 role where I'm expected to be present. It holds me accountable and feels like I'm actually doing 'work.' A longer lunch might be nice though haha. There's so much to do constantly that I feel like I don't even get my full 30 mins cos I'll just take it to my computer so I can finish things. Lol!
 

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I demand the return of the crazy face! :crazy:
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I am a "data scientist" in title, but in practice, I'm mostly an internal developer for our department-- I do some data analytics stuff, but mostly, I build tools that are used by other data scientists and data analysts.

The field is a great fit for me. The job itself is interesting enough, but I am working on my own business(es) too, and on passive income streams, so I hope to eventually be completely self-employed (in the same field).

Anyone can learn to code, but it helps if you have strong logic. There's a misconception that you have to be good at math-- I think it's not really "math", but logic in particular. If you are good at proofs, formal logic, or logic puzzles, you would probably be able to learn to code relatively easily. I didn't learn at all until I was 26 (I'm 29 now).

There is another misconception that you have to be "detail-oriented"-- but IMO, it's not details in the meaning of sensory details. It's logical precision. (Most modern IDEs take care of the traditional meaning of details. There are some you still have to deal with, but this goes for every job outside of academia at least.)

Logic is only one part of it. In my job, I'm usually told what management/internal customer/client wants. Then I structure the project, get requirements, then code. So, even if I'm told the what, I have to figure out the how-- so you have to be able to just come up with stuff and figure stuff out.

Also, it's probably not a good fit for someone who is very social or who is interested in interacting with people a lot. :p

As for what I would change, I constantly change stuff. I have enough independence at this point my career to move forward with testing out and ultimately implementing my own ideas without needing too much sign off from management. I've been explicitly told I have directional control of the role too.

Feel free to ask if you have questions. (Not just OP but others too)
 

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I do what I do as my own boss. This is of course very difficult. I know this , so I plan my free time very carefully. My job is my hobby Free online slots. Some time ago, I had a terrible boss who was an inadequate person. I have now corrected this situation.
 

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Tell us about your job.

1.Do you like it?
2.Would you rather do something else, what?
3.Who would you recommend it to, and who should not take your job?
4.What would you change about your job to improve it?
:happy:
1. Yes.
2. Yes, idk. Thankfully my job is various enough to make it really difficult to be bored.
3. Wouldn't recommend. The argument I'm making has two sides to "who" should have it. It's beneficial if you like people cause it'll be easy. Then it's so easy it's almost better if you dislike people cause then you get to develope your weakside while performing results.
4. The wage. There's no money in it. No career. No education. It's solid and life-long once you get in. Wage is clearly an issue here! So much that I feel underappreciated and losing motivation continueing it, I'm considering starting an argument with the union who BS a lot and/or find another job.
 

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I do vocational work with people who have disabilities.


1.Do you like it?

Yes. I enjoy most of my clients. I rarely have a time where I groan about going into work... Sometimes a difficult person comes through. Had a person who kind of scared me. She attacked a staff person at her group home while working with me lol. I already felt afraid of her before that incident. Didn't even know she was violent until then.

So most of the time I like my job. Most of the clients are pleasant to work with, and if they're not, the program is done in two months. I get to work in the field and I have a lot of indepence in my job. I also like that I don't see coworkers much (heh, to be honest, there's usually a person or two I don't like >_>)

It also aligns well with my intersts -- most of the clients have mental disorders, which I am also interested in.


2.Would you rather do something else, what?

I'm looking to get into something more specific to mental health. I'm going back to school to go down a psychiatric route via nursing.


3.Who would you recommend it to, and who should not take your job?

If you lack patience and empathy, stay the hell out of this job.


4.What would you change about your job to improve it?
:happy:

More money lol.
 

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Tell us about your job.

1.Do you like it?
2.Would you rather do something else, what?
3.Who would you recommend it to, and who should not take your job?
4.What would you change about your job to improve it?
:happy:
1. I am a software engineer. I like it most days since I love programming/problem solving
2. I can't imagine myself doing anything else.
3. I'd recommend it to anyone who has an interest in it. There are many sub-focuses in tech and it's stable and well compensated. IMO you don't need to be too smart, you just need to be get past the initial learning curve.
4. It's a corporate job so that's not fun. I'd like to eventually shift to a tech job focused on public good once I feel financially stable.
 

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1.) Do you like it? Yes.

2.Would you rather do something else, what? I would rather be doing working with Computers but this is a great company to work with.

3.) Who would you recommend it to, and who should not take your job? People who suck at showing up for work shouldn't take this and people who are great at showing up for work and need work experience should take it.

4.) What would you change about your job to improve it? Bigger buildings overall. Harsher about keeping bathrooms clean.
 

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Tell us about your job.

1.Do you like it?
2.Would you rather do something else, what?
3.Who would you recommend it to, and who should not take your job?
4.What would you change about your job to improve it?
:happy:
1.Do you like it?
I don't like it...I love it. I'm a regional asset protection specialist. I view it as part criminal investigator and part physical accounting. We're the badasses of the finance department lol.

I protect company assets: I research theft, including fraud, implement safety programs, and administrate inventory. There is a ton of travel (which is currently suspended) and a lot of responsibility. Nothing like finding $15,000 or stopping a thief or theft ring.

In 2019 outside of travelling around the Midwest (OKC, KC, St. Louis, Minneapolis, and a variety of other mid to small cities in the Midwest), I got to go to Orlando twice and New Orleans. I actually ended 2019 in Orlando and began 2020 in Minneapolis. Then it was every other week in Detroit with stops in OKC, northern Indiana, Wisconsin, and St. Louis before the quarantine. It beats the hell out of going to the same cubicle every day to see the same douche bags. I need to get back of the road ASAP!

2.Would you rather do something else, what?
I wouldn't mind focusing solely in on fraud investigations/research. It's the ultimate hunt. The feeling of solving a case is a high.

3.Who would you recommend it to, and who should not take your job?
You have to have people skills. You have to be analytical. You have to withstand spending a lot of time on the road. You have to have a lot of determination and a very strong work ethic. If you don't have all of these it's going to be rough.

4.What would you change about your job to improve it?
Hire one or two more people. We're shorthanded and the work load is crazy. I also wouldn't mind travelling a little less. It's tough with relationships and just having a life at times. Before the quarantine (and it'll happen again once it's over) is leave on Sunday, comeback Thursday night or Friday, and repeat.
 

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1.Do you like it?


Yes.

2.Would you rather do something else, what?


Yes. Many things. The path I eventually chose was one out of many I wanted to try.

3.Who would you recommend it to, and who should not take your job?


I work in academia. I would recommend working in academia to people who actually enjoy research and teaching. Wouldn't recommend it to anyone who only cares about the status and doesn't actually have the qualifications needed in research, or would abuse their power, eg. if they had a professorship.

4.What would you change about your job to improve it?

Multiply online research tools.
 

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1.Do you like it?
I work at a large national pizza chain. No, my coworkers are very young and annoying.

2.Would you rather do something else, what?
Maybe an office job or a cushy job at a department store if those ever open up again.


3.Who would you recommend it to, and who should not take your job?
Brash teens fresh out of high school who think they can take on the world. Anybody else but them should not work there.


4.What would you change about your job to improve it?
The franchise owner is mean and makes up a lot of rules for punishment. My superiors blow my mistakes out of proportion. Is is really gonna kill somebody if I mistakenly put a little too much bacon on a pizza? If people keep leaving and you keep having to change management there is a reason. Just run your restaurants a tad more professional and you can keep people.
 
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