Personality Cafe banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Basically, what personality do you guys think would make the best architect?

Also do you think 22 years old is too late to go to school (considering a 4 years Bs in Arch. + 2 years Masters)

Thanks.
 

·
exploring space
ENFP
Joined
·
9,403 Posts
No 22 is not too late. All that matters is that you do what you like.
My sister is an architect with a master in city planning and human geography (or smth) and she is ENTP. I also know one other ENTP and an INTP. I don't think there is a best personality for that necessarily, as long as you have good spatial and visualization skills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
No 22 is not too late. All that matters is that you do what you like.
My sister is an architect with a master in city planning and human geography (or smth) and she is ENTP. I also know one other ENTP and an INTP. I don't think there is a best personality for that necessarily, as long as you have good spatial and visualization skills.
Ok then thanks Red Panda. I'm also an INTP. Feels good to read what you wrote!
Good luck to yourself and your sister. Also, if you don't mind me asking, how's your sister doing job wise? (Fulfilling/job security/pay/any trouble finding work?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,869 Posts
I started back at school when I was 27. Never too late.

If you do go back to school, I strongly advise you avoid mainstream colleges, and just take 2 years of community college. It's a fraction of the cost, and you can get 2 years of core classes out of the way. After that, you'll not only have a much better idea of what you truly want to do (trust me, even after a 9 year career and hundreds of hours of research, I changed my major three times!), but you'll be 1/2 way there at a fraction of the cost you otherwise would be. And, you save yourself pressure to "just stay at this school and get X degree," as you'll be expecting to transfer from your community college.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I started back at school when I was 27. Never too late.

If you do go back to school, I strongly advise you avoid mainstream colleges, and just take 2 years of community college. It's a fraction of the cost, and you can get 2 years of core classes out of the way. After that, you'll not only have a much better idea of what you truly want to do (trust me, even after a 9 year career and hundreds of hours of research, I changed my major three times!), but you'll be 1/2 way there at a fraction of the cost you otherwise would be. And, you save yourself pressure to "just stay at this school and get X degree," as you'll be expecting to transfer from your community college.
Thanks for replying, but I'm from Canada (Quebec). We don't have community colleges here. The good thing is that we go to "CEGEP" right after high school, so I'll graduate pretty much a year early or settle for more relax course loads. (I'm planning to transfer to an out of province university)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,869 Posts
Thanks for replying, but I'm from Canada (Quebec). We don't have community colleges here. The good thing is that we go to "CEGEP" right after high school, so I'll graduate pretty much a year early or settle for more relax course loads.
Ahhh well regardless, don't feel it's too late. I ended up on a path of Architecture myself, after considering Industrial Engineering, Computer Science, and (briefly) psychology.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Ahhh well regardless, don't feel it's too late. I ended up on a path of Architecture myself, after considering Industrial Engineering, Computer Science, and (briefly) psychology.
Oh cool. I thought of engineering too (civil though) and computer science. My first year in college I was in psychology and I hated it! I believe civil engineering will be m fallback major if I ever decide to switch. I am, after all, an INTp( small p :( )
But yeah, how's your path going? graduated/graduating when/what made you settle to architecture/what school have you gone to are going?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,869 Posts
To be honest, I'm currently considering landscaping architecture over "pure" architecture or other types. This is mostly due to my simple interest and enjoyment of nature, however there are a lot of technical background factors in the design of landscape that fascinate me as well.

You wouldn't recognize any school I've been to, I can assure you ;) In high school I maintained a B average through sheer deductive reasoning, and despite being in the workforce after high school for 9 years, I still fail to prioritize or incentivize myself to getting all A's. (I have about a 3.0 average now.)

Having said all this, I pretty much am done with all core classes and will be pursuing classes relative to architecture next semester. (I suppose I'm considered a Junior now.) Therefore I have little to say, so far, on what to expect relative to specifics. I will say, however, that you need to be very familiar with trig. That was a difficult concept for me to grasp at first, but mostly because I thought I could "skip Algebra and Geometry and go straight to Pre-Calculus" after being away from school for almost a decade, lol. To make a long story a little longer, I am now fine in Trig and would get into Calculus easily enough (though it isn't a requirement).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
To be honest, I'm currently considering landscaping architecture over "pure" architecture or other types. This is mostly due to my simple interest and enjoyment of nature, however there are a lot of technical background factors in the design of landscape that fascinate me as well.

You wouldn't recognize any school I've been to, I can assure you ;) In high school I maintained a B average through sheer deductive reasoning, and despite being in the workforce after high school for 9 years, I still fail to prioritize or incentivize myself to getting all A's. (I have about a 3.0 average now.)

Having said all this, I pretty much am done with all core classes and will be pursuing classes relative to architecture next semester. (I suppose I'm considered a Junior now.) Therefore I have little to say, so far, on what to expect relative to specifics. I will say, however, that you need to be very familiar with trig. That was a difficult concept for me to grasp at first, but mostly because I thought I could "skip Algebra and Geometry and go straight to Pre-Calculus" after being away from school for almost a decade, lol. To make a long story a little longer, I am now fine in Trig and would get into Calculus easily enough (though it isn't a requirement).
Ah I see.. Pretty interesting story you got there!
As for grades. I looked at things the same way you do, until I found out I'm an INTP. Now I feel like if I don't give my 100% in school, I'm wasting my "talent". Dunno It's just how I reason and it's spreading into other stuff I do slowly.
Also, Trig is my favorite part of math :) I'm really excited about that!
 

·
exploring space
ENFP
Joined
·
9,403 Posts
Ok then thanks Red Panda. I'm also an INTP. Feels good to read what you wrote!
Good luck to yourself and your sister. Also, if you don't mind me asking, how's your sister doing job wise? (Fulfilling/job security/pay/any trouble finding work?)
Thanks too. :happy:
Well, she's been unemployed for a long time now, but we also live in Greece so things are two times worse than other countries. She's also chosen a difficult field,not the usual stuff architects do so it's even harder to find something. She's looking into PhDs in Europe, but those that pay you instead of paying them are very few.
Still, when you finish your degree things might be better in the construction field, especially in some countries.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,083 Posts
I started back at school when I was 27. Never too late.

If you do go back to school, I strongly advise you avoid mainstream colleges, and just take 2 years of community college. It's a fraction of the cost, and you can get 2 years of core classes out of the way. After that, you'll not only have a much better idea of what you truly want to do (trust me, even after a 9 year career and hundreds of hours of research, I changed my major three times!), but you'll be 1/2 way there at a fraction of the cost you otherwise would be. And, you save yourself pressure to "just stay at this school and get X degree," as you'll be expecting to transfer from your community college.
Pretty much the plan here. 24 (25 in 2 weeks), and just started. Going for an A.A.S in Electrical Engineering Tech, going for an entry level technician job to test the waters after getting the A.A.S. and if I like the career path, then I will likely expand to either a full Electrical Engineering Bachelors, or go back to my community college and take up their Partnership with Lehigh and Temple Universities and go another 2 years for a Bachelors in Mechatronics Engineering (pretty much summed up as a condensed bachelors that includes Electrical and Mechanical engineering.)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Omniscient

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
I found ENFPs were pretty good architects. From my insight, the ENFPs I know were always on the more design level.

As others have said, go to a community college and get as many of the core you can out of the way. DO NOT take insane-named courses. The goal of this is to hedge against the admissions committee of your BS to MS school so you don't have to repeat as many credits as possible.

Good luck.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Omniscient

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Basically, what personality do you guys think would make the best architect?
INTX should make the best architects among the types.The INTP more so at designing creative architectural designs.
As I've learnt,the INTP[Ti]is the master at stretching theoretical possibilities at its max.[Must...use..Ti...awesome...math]
Ne is the perfect creative engine for the generation of enthusiastic ideas.
INTJ[Ni] is contingent innovation at its finest.When coupled with Te,it brings in the finance game.
Nevertheless,XNTP's are the masters of crazy lego constructs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
I think a P has an advantage because it's something creative.

I think Ns are more planners and designers so that is also an advantage. Maybe INFJ might be interested but typically it's more NTs that like to do such planning work. NFs might be driven away from the lack of interaction.

INTP on one personality site is called "the architect".

Personality-wise you are well aligned for the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
Basically, what personality do you guys think would make the best architect?
The type that’s really passionate about architecture and wants to make it his/her profession?
It could be any MBTI type. I’m an architect. I’m INFP. I often encouter ENTPs and INFJs but there are plenty of other types around. And there are various fields to specialize in: project management, conceptual design, engineering, urban planning etc.

I graduated with a dual degree in architecture and architectural engineering. But a renewed interest in architectural history has led me to pursue an additional degree in conservation in order to become a heritage researcher and/or a preservation architect.
Meanwhile I still work as an architect and try to explore some new areas in the field. Through work, interships and some -shorter- freelance projects.

Also do you think 22 years old is too late to go to school (considering a 4 years Bs in Arch. + 2 years Masters)
I went to university from 17-23 and I re-enrolled at 26 (I’m now 27). So obviously it isn’t.
In your mid-twenties you might even have an advantage because you’ll have a much better grasp of your abilities and aspirations than you had in your late teens. And by the time you graduate you’ll still have a career of nearly 40 years ahead of you.
Though a solid career in architecture might take years to build (see below).

(Fulfilling/job security/pay/any trouble finding work?)
I’m located in Western Europe, so there might be some differences. Anyway:

I graduated and I started working virtually the next day. I even got job offers. But while there wasn’t any shortage of jobs, finding one that was fulfilling -in both content and pay- was more challenging.
We have a system similar to the US’s IDP program and sadly, it’s used to keep starting wages low under the pretense you’re still a trainee. But eventually you’ll be able to get your wage up based on your performance. Which is necesarry, since the job also requires some investments (insurances, and if you start working on your own projects: we all know that -legal- cad and graphic software isn’t cheap - not to mention the study loans some people carry around).
I generally found working at smaller offices more challenging, as they allow you to go through more phases of the building process.

As for job security: the crucial question is probably if a life-long ‘career’ at the same office would truly be fulfilling, as the equity partners are usually also the chief architects who pull most of the (fun) strings. The ‘stereotypical’ architect who actually designs and exectues his own projects is an ENTREPRENEUR - I probably can’t stress this aspect enough.
At an office, you’re most likely to end up as a project architect. Reaching this point will already take a lot of work (6 years of university, IDP, overtime, keeping up to date with new legislations and construction techniques), but establishing a career as an professional architect with own realisations will take even more effort (networking, participating in design contests, working on minor projects for family members - all of this in your ‘free’ time, in the hope it eventually pays off and gets you more projects).

My experiences with engineering were more relaxing and came with a higher $$$ :tongue:
So while it might have been an ‘easy’ route to continue along that path, I still chose to follow my interests.
I have always been fascinated by built heritage, I just took me a long time to realise I could actually make a proffession out of it.. The combination of scientific investigation methods with historic research also seems right up my alley (humanties are present in architectural education, but are -sadly- usually lacking in the workfield).
It probably also holds more long term potential as I don’t really see myself establishing my own office (which would have caused a standstill in couple of a years), but I do have the ambtion to work as an independent expert for other offices or governmental instances.

I realise it will still take several years to get there, but so far I’m rather enjoying the ride.

---
Additional notes:

This blog of an US architect gives some insight in the actual profession and tackles some common misconceptions (to be taken with a little grain of salt):
Top Ten Reasons NOT to be an Architect | Life of an Architect
Top Ten Reasons to be an Architect | Life of an Architect

Also, Trig is my favorite part of math :) I'm really excited about that!
While I certainly had courses in trigonometry and mathematics, I had a LOT more physics. But this might be regional.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
710 Posts
I agree that you are far from too late. I graduated my undergrad architecture degree recently and at 21 i was one of the younger students, there were a few 30 year olds in fact.

Personally i would say any Intuitive type can make a great architect. However they obviously all have different strengths. Ive noticed that NTs have the advantage of being very clear about how they arrive at a design, a huge asset in school and in marketting your designs later on.

NFs can often imbue their designs with more of a cultural/value-based depth, but we can have trouble selling it to the suit-and-tie crowd.

Im not sure that perceivers would be better necessarily. I would say they might be more subtle and in tune with the existing context and conditions, but sometimes boldness is an asset, and judgers tend to bring that in abundance.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top